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AP Calculus BC

Get ready to learn some amazing math in an amazing way! This AP Calculus course is an engaging, interactive, and student-friendly course that suits all learning styles, with auditory, visual, and…

Grade AP

Subject Mathematics

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

AP Calculus BC

Grade
AP

Subject
Mathematics

Type
Online

Get ready to learn some amazing math in an amazing way!

This AP Calculus course is an engaging, interactive, and student-friendly course that suits all learning styles, with auditory, visual, and hands-on components throughout. Each lesson involves interactive videos that allow students to go at their own speed, with the ability to pause and rewind at any point. Many lessons include fun, interactive applets and dynamic graphs that enhance student understanding.

Each video is accompanied by a student-friendly note package that allows students to take notes to whatever level of detail they like. There are also tons of practice questions with full, detailed solutions for each, which means students will never get stuck and can learn how to solve even the most difficult calculus problems. Students can also retake every quiz and test to help them master the material and perform their best.

This course is strongly recommended for students who are planning to take Calculus at post-secondary. The material covered in this course roughly corresponds to the material addressed in both first and second semester Calculus at the university level. Students also have the option to complete the AP exam, and if they score high enough they can earn univeristy math credits to apply to post secondary education. Please note, families will be invoiced for the associated exam fees if a student chooses to write the AP exam.

View the AP Calculus BC Intro video here.

Requirements

A graphing calculator is built into every practice question, so a handheld one is not needed.

Having an additional handheld scientific calculator, however, will be useful.

Co-requisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (if not already completed)

Major Units and Topics

  • Functions
  • Limits
  • Derivatives
  • Applications of Derivatives
  • Integrals
  • Applications of Integrals
  • Differential Equations
  • Analytic Geometry
  • Series and Convergence
  • Polynomial Series and Approximations
  • Advanced Topics unique to AP

Assessment

Each chapter typically has:
  • Video Notes
  • Practice Questions
  • Two Quizzes
  • Review Assignment
  • Practice Test
  • Test
  • Activities or Explorations unique to AP

AP Calculus AB

Get ready to learn some amazing math in an amazing way! This AP Calculus course is an engaging, interactive, and student-friendly course that suits all learning styles, with auditory, visual, and…

Grade AP

Subject Mathematics

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

AP Calculus AB

Grade
AP

Subject
Mathematics

Type
Online

Get ready to learn some amazing math in an amazing way!

This AP Calculus course is an engaging, interactive, and student-friendly course that suits all learning styles, with auditory, visual, and hands-on components throughout. Each lesson involves interactive videos that allow students to go at their own speed, with the ability to pause and rewind at any point. Many lessons include fun, interactive applets and dynamic graphs that enhance student understanding.

Each video is accompanied by a student-friendly note package that allows students to take notes to whatever level of detail they like. There are also tons of practice questions with full, detailed solutions for each, which means students will never get stuck and can learn how to solve even the most difficult calculus problems. Students can also retake every quiz and test to help them master the material and perform their best.

This course is strongly recommended for students who are planning to take Calculus at a post-secondary institution. Students who complete AP Calculus AB will learn material that is roughly equivalent to the topics covered in a first semester univeristy calculus course. Students also have the option to complete the AP exam, and if they score high enough they can earn univeristy math credits to apply to post secondary education. Please note, families will be invoiced for the associated exam fees if a student chooses to write the AP exam.

View the AP Calculus AB Intro video here.

Requirements

A graphing calculator is built into every practice question, so a handheld one is not needed.

Having an additional handheld scientific calculator, however, will be useful.

Co-requisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (if not already completed)

Major Units and Topics

  • Functions
  • Limits
  • Derivatives
  • Applications of Derivatives
  • Integrals
  • Applications of Integrals
  • Differential Equations
  • Advanced Topics unique to AP

Assessment

Each chapter typically has:
  • Video Notes
  • Practice Questions
  • Two Quizzes
  • Review Assignment
  • Practice Test
  • Test
  • Activities/Explorations unique to AP

AP Macroeconomics

The purpose of AP Macroeconomics 12 is to give students a working understanding of Macroeconomics and to have them well prepared for the College Board AP exam in May of each year. Throughout the…

Grade AP

Subject ADST

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

AP Macroeconomics

Grade
AP

Subject
ADST

Type
Online

The purpose of AP Macroeconomics 12 is to give students a working understanding of Macroeconomics and to have them well prepared for the College Board AP exam in May of each year. Throughout the course, students are provided with a thorough understanding of the principles of Economics – and, through a variety of interfaces – so they can robustly interact with the functions, methods and strategies of economic decision-making. From simpler concepts such as scarcity, and supply and demand, to more advanced considerations related to production decisions and international trade, this course places emphasis on higher level reasoning and analysis in relation to national income, fiscal and monetary policy, measures of economic performance and international trade. Therefore, significant emphasis will be placed upon: developing critical thinking skills so that economic precepts can be questioned and tested against reality and various side-effects; and, developing an understanding of the delicate relationship between market efficiencies and its implications at national and international levels, in terms of allocating (or misallocating) resources, and recognizing the difficult task governments have in managing market forces. Students will be able to fully articulate the nature of economic conflict; and, in the context of analysing current economic issues, demonstrate how informed economic choices can be made to balance the conflicting economic objectives, rights, and responsibilities of various economic stakeholders.

Please note, families will be invoiced for the associated exam fees if a student chooses to write the AP exam.

Requirements

Students need to create an AP college board student account in order to access supplementary class materials

Major Units and Topics

  • Scarcity and Opportunity Cost
  • Supply and Demand
  • Production Possibilities
  • Circular Flow, GDP, Unemployment
  • Price, Inflation and Elasticity
  • National Income and Price Determination
  • Fiscal Policy and Stabilizers
  • Banking and Interest Rates
  • Monetary Policy and Money Markets
  • Economic Growth and Public Policy

Assessment

As an AP level course (college credit if successful on the AP exam) emphasis is placed on the learner being able to direct their own learning, navigating resources provided and while working on cases, forums, review questions and quizzes. There are six unit-tests and a final mock exam which students will be well prepared for given the highly engaging video-based instruction and interactive modelling activities. Students will propose an economic problem and work through a suitable method for resolving it so they can build confidence simulating routines of a practicing economist. A larger project will allow students to evaluate present day economic phenomena and reflect on the delicate nature of economic relationships. In this case, students will be tasked with simulating the role of a policy-maker.

Political Studies 12

When people think of the word “politics,” they might think of politicians in suits yelling at each other, talking over each other, insulting each other, and just generally being a bunch of big…

Grade 12

Subject Social Studies

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

Political Studies 12

Grade
12

Subject
Social Studies

Type
Online

When people think of the word “politics,” they might think of politicians in suits yelling at each other, talking over each other, insulting each other, and just generally being a bunch of big overpaid babies. Or, they might think of a leader who was able to make a difference in the world.

When we talk about politics, we are talking about governments and laws and debates and politics is about politicians and leaders and the impact they have on the world, both negative and positive, but at its heart, politics is about power. In society, power can be used to create great things and enact change and make society a better place to live in, but it can also be abused leading to oppression or tyranny, or even death. So we need to be careful who gets the power.

And who gets to decide who gets the power? You do! That’s what this course is about. Students get to learn how to talk about politics in a way that is constructive rather than destructive, and about different ways that societies can be governed so that they can use the power they have to make their society more right, more just, and more whole.

View the intro video for Political Studies 12 here.

Requirements

  • Successful completion of Social Studies 10 is required for enrollment in this course.
  • Students must complete all lessons and assignments
  • Each lesson is designed to take approximately 60 – 90 minutes, with the exception of major projects and assignments

Major Units and Topics

  • Society and Government
  • Political Ideologies
  • Polarization and Media
  • Elections, Governing, and Political Power
  • Local, Regional, National, and International Politics

Assessment

  • Quizzes and response questions
  • Various activities
  • Fifty-year plan
  • Political Ideologies test
  • Political Conversation Assignment
  • Minorities and Political Power Essay
  • Get Involved Assignment
  • Country Study Project
  • Final Exam

Law Studies 12

Law 12 explores the Canadian legal system and examines how to live responsibly in the context of a legally administered society. In addition to understanding various frameworks and processes…

Grade 12

Subject Social Studies

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

Law Studies 12

Grade
12

Subject
Social Studies

Type
Online

Law 12 explores the Canadian legal system and examines how to live responsibly in the context of a legally administered society. In addition to understanding various frameworks and processes, as well as the substance, of Law in Canada, the benefits of learning law go far beyond the circumference of “what” is studied. Historically, law was considered one of the finest fields for deepening intellectual development: in aristocratic days, legal studies were among the highest learning ambitions for nobles; today, law’s distinction remains, but with an increasing number of women and minorities participating. To be sure, legal studies develop higher reasoning skills prized across careers and so students of law find themselves well equipped for abundant opportunities beyond schooling. But in addition to learned skillsets and outlooks that enable students to think through complex legal, social, and ethical issues, law enlarges problem-solving capacities and equips learners to think in greater dimension, empowering them to more effectively evaluate causes and effects of cultural relations having immediate bearing on everyday life. As such, the study of law can be a powerful vehicle for untapping rights and freedoms that may become the impetus for advancing human liberties.

Requirements

N/A

Major Units and Topics

The course first explores the foundations of the Canadian legal system and thereafter walks students through the components of criminal, civil and contract law. Within these larger domains of study, students focus on legal topics and problems from within the Canadian context, such as, but not limited to: constitution; human rights; arrest and legal procedure; sentencing; search and seizure; young offenders; marriage, family, property, and business law; aboriginal law; and, international law. The course is suited to inquiries of personal interest and accommodates varied learning styles, so long as students enjoy reasoning and can take initiative in problem-solving activities. Since the study is of an analytical nature, students who enjoy thinking and reflecting are natural candidates; however, law should not be thought of as a strictly academic venture since many aspects of the study of law are descriptive and explanatory by nature. In short, one will get out of the study of law what one puts into it.

Assessment

Assignments are varied in type and complexity. In learning about the history and foundations of law, and taking account of the nature of Canada’s legal institutions and processes early on, initial learning activities and assessment revolve around reading comprehension. As students progress through the course, they will be met with more inquiry-oriented or reflective kinds of responses, in which case students will summarize thoughts on readings, respond to questions, perform case studies, evaluate ethical dilemmas, profile and diagnose legal problems; and, in the process, respond largely through careful analysis of facts and interpreting them in relation to legal principles. In short, students will be expected to offer evidence for positions taken, while incorporating skills learned in lessons. There are no tests, and many of the tedious aspects of law are removed to make the learning experience pleasant, personal and liberating.

Humanities 12 - Comparative World Religions 12

IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO: • Humanities 12 – Christian Studies 12 (4 credits)…

Grade 12

Subject Social Studies

Type Synchronous

Graduation Credits 4

Humanities 12 - Comparative World Religions 12

Grade
12

Subject
Social Studies

Type
Synchronous

IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO:
  • Humanities 12 – Christian Studies 12 (4 credits)
  • Humanities 12 – English Studies 12 (4 credits)
Humanities 12 students also have the option to add
  • Humanities 12 – Leadership 12 (4 credits)

Humanities 12 is far more than just a 3 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. Although students receive full credit for three important graduation program courses, the integrated approach, which Humanities 12 employs, blends the literary and cultural developments of the times with enduring biblical reference points. The eight episode modules follow a loose chronological pattern that corresponds with the emergence of the major world religions and their divergent glory pursuits.

As C.S. Lewis so poignantly states, “The promise of glory is the promise, almost incredible and only possible by the work of Christ, that some of us shall actually survive that examination, shall find approval, shall please God. To please God, to be a real ingredient in the divine happiness, to be loved by God, not merely pitied but delighted in as an artist delights in his work or a father in a son – it seems impossible, a weight or burden of glory which our thoughts can hardly sustain. But so it is.”

In Humanities 12 we are going to look at our intrinsic desire for glory revealed in our self-glorying tendencies and which are only fulfilled in a relationship with the God of glory who promises that one day we will complete our quest and be made glorious. World religions reveal this pursuit of glory. To see God’s glory is our greatest joy; self-glorification, our greatest vice.

The synchronous class schedule can be viewed here.

Furthermore, the option to add Leadership 12, featuring the application of Gospel Leadership principles to life, practice, and vocational calling, is an efficient way to build a high school graduation transcript attractive to both post-secondary employers and institutions of higher education.

Requirements

Enthusiasm for robust biblical engagement with historical and literary themes. Students are required to download and complete or print assignments, scan (either by taking pictures or physically scanning) and upload their assignments. This course also requires attendance of LIVE biweekly lectures and tutorials with the teaching team using ZOOM video conferencing. Humanities 12 is best completed as a linear program starting in September but other special arrangements can be made if necessary after consultation with the Hum12 teaching team.

Major Units and Topics

Episode 1 On Religion
  • The Search for Glory
  • “Human history is the long terrible story of man trying to find something other than God which will make him happy.” ~ CS Lewis

Episode 2 Ancient Polytheism
  • Glory Misplaced
  • How the Genesis account was written to counter ancient polytheism

Episode 3 Judaism
  • Glory and Goodness
  • Moses – “Show me your glory.” And God said, “I will make all my goodness pass before you.” Exodus 33:18

Episode 4 Greek Mythology
  • Heroic Glory

Episode 5 Islam/Buddhism
  • Islam: Glory in Justice
  • Buddhism: Glory in Peace

Episode 6 Atheism
  • A search for Freedom, a denial of glory

Episode 7 Secularism
  • Religion: A search for Happiness in the glory of the self

Episode 8 Christianity
  • Glory and Happiness
  • Human flourishing is only found in the discovery that the glory of God and human happiness are not conflicting pursuits. Rather, they are compatible realities where the pursuit of the former results in the experience of the latter. As Jonathan Edwards says, “One is inferred in the other.”

Assessment

This is a synchronous hybrid multi-credit 8-episode program.

8 monthly Assignment Sets

Participation in Weekly Lectures and Tutorials

Economic Theory 12

Economic Theory 12 is a Social Studies course, differing from Economics 12, a business course, in that is focuses on broader relationships between Economics and Culture. Whereas Economics 12 deals…

Grade 12

Subject Social Studies

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

Economic Theory 12

Grade
12

Subject
Social Studies

Type
Online

Economic Theory 12 is a Social Studies course, differing from Economics 12, a business course, in that is focuses on broader relationships between Economics and Culture. Whereas Economics 12 deals more strictly with the logic of Economics through the lens of Business and Policy, students interested in the Social Sciences and Humanities will be well served by this study if interested in Social Theory, Law, Cultural Studies or if to simply develop a stronger background learning how Economics more generally affects everyday life. A study of Economic Theory is an interesting and practical way to learn how economic activities influence personal, cultural and political life, while also building a more general Economics intuition that is sure to benefit one’s broader knowledge of the economy and some aspects of personal finance and investment. If interested in going into Business, Law, the Humanities or the Social Sciences, this course provides an outstanding background study that will help students better understand, think through and intelligently reflect on a foundational aspect of our cultural livelihood. Heavy emphasis will be placed on historical economic policies so students can understand how theories adopted in earlier times acted upon cultural life (i.e. unintended effects on markets, uneven effects on taxation, unexpected consequences on the environment). Students also explore shifting realities in cultural life today to consider how a more diverse cultural landscape warrants more creative economic policies and practices.

Requirements

N/A

Major Units and Topics

Assessment

The course relies largely on readings, case studies and lighter applications of economic analysis but also allows students to direct their own inquiries on policy topics of personal interest. Ability to discern problems, offer solutions and recognize implications in relation to differing values and needs will require strong analysis and intuition skills typical of a humanities course. There are no exams, but assignments will require abilities to perform research and investigate implications since students are expected to demonstrate versatility in being able to think through, apply and examine the merits of learned concepts in relation to hypothetical scenarios.

Comparative Cultures 12

Comparative Cultures 12 explores the emergence, maintenance and advancement of cultures across time so students can recognize and reflect on the many forces that give shape to differing human…

Grade 12

Subject Social Studies

Type Individualized, Hybrid

Graduation Credits 4

Comparative Cultures 12

Grade
12

Subject
Social Studies

Type
Individualized, Hybrid

Comparative Cultures 12 explores the emergence, maintenance and advancement of cultures across time so students can recognize and reflect on the many forces that give shape to differing human livelihoods.

After being introduced to a well laid out analytical schema for understanding how to evaluate culture-making, students will apply it to documented historical events and cross-cultural samplings of literature, art, and philosophy. Within each of these areas, students will consider the merits of political, social, and economic structures, paying particular attention to the underlying cultural mythos (worldview or outlook) governing day-to-day habits of thought and animating cultural motivations. In the process, students will be introduced to differing criteria for evaluating cultural norms so they can appreciate varying cultural practices, and in so doing learn to value the diversity of their fellow man; western culture will be compared with non-western perspectives to help students realize that patterns of western life are not essentially better or worse, but different, based on specifically western goals.

In the end, students will sample the ways people from diverse cultural landscapes solve everyday problems, develop systems to govern public life, create meanings and symbols to unify outlooks, and define hope to forge a flourishing cultural life; alongside the inquiries, students will sensitively examine the structures of culture which contribute to universal notions of injustice which impede the public good. Among the primary purposes of Comparative Cultures 12 is a recognition that in a more complex and ethnically integrated world, well informed students will not only be enriched by cross-cultural learning, but in the process, be equipped as ambassadors to heal misunderstandings certain to arise in a milieu of accelerating human difference.

Requirements

N/A

Major Units and Topics

The course is delivered in a user-friendly manner so students can focus on inquiries that are of personal interest.

The first four units introduce students to investigative principles for studying cross-cultural meaning-making, while also providing analytical schemas for being able to identify relations between higher meanings (ideals) and symbolic and representational cultural forms that carry mythic orientations into wider cultural life.

Following the first four units, which satisfy the majority of the learning requirements (Big Ideas), students will appropriate skills learned and perform in-depth historical inquiry on cultures of their own choosing. In doing so, they will come into contact with the outworkings of cultural life (philosophy, the arts, governance, legal frameworks, outlooks, values and distinctive cultural expression) explore problems unique to cultures, reflect on ethical questions of local and universal significance and draw relations within and between cultures to ponder how differently lived realities explain human livelihood.

Assessment

Assessment will largely consist of short question and answer, personal response papers, critical ethical inquiries (case studies), open-ended reflective questions, comparative essays, event chronicling, and overview write-ups. Students will be given an abundance of opportunities within each area to make their own significant connections as they desire to uniquely reflect on the ‘nature of man’ in the process of society-building.

20th Century World History 12

20th Century History 12 Online encompasses the major developments in world history in the 20th century with a focus on international relations in the years 1919-1991. During the course, students…

Grade 12

Subject Social Studies

Type Online

Graduation Credits 4

20th Century World History 12

Grade
12

Subject
Social Studies

Type
Online

20th Century History 12 Individualized encompasses the major developments in world history in the 20th century with a focus on international relations in the years 1919-1991. During the course, students will investigate the causes, events and effects of:
  • An aspirational, ascendant geopolitical (and personal) orientation.
  • Sociological changes, economic shifts and technological developments.
  • Imperialism, nationalism, international diplomacy and cooperation.
  • The two World Wars, the Cold War, and other more localized conflicts.
  • The development and implementation of political ideologies.
  • The failure of humankind to sustain the empire imaginary.

Requirements

Completion of Social Studies 10 recommended.

Major Units and Topics

  • Conflict and Challenge (World War 1 and the Russian Revolution)
  • Promise and Collapse (The Interwar Years)
  • Turmoil and Tragedy (World War 2)
  • Transformation and Tension (The Cold War, the Middle East, and Revolutions in Asia)
  • Progress and Uncertainty (Superpower Arms Race and Collapse of the Soviet Union)

Assessment

  • Lesson 1 to 9 Exam: 25%
  • Major Unit Assignments: 40% (4 assignments @ 10% each)
  • Topic of the Week Forum Responses: 20%
  • Lesson by Lesson Homework + Checklists: 5%
  • Live Event Participation: 10%