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ADST 5: Leveled Coding in Tynker

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools. Students will start with an introduction to…

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools.

Students will start with an introduction to Tynker, learning how to use Tynker's tools to create their own coding projects. Following this introduction students will complete one of Tynker's leveled courses, checking in with the course teacher, whom they can access for help and support along the way. The module will conclude when students complete a design challenge in Tynker's "Blank Project" workspace.

At the beginning of the module, students will meet with the module teacher to decide which Tynker course to complete. This will ensure that students are working at the right difficulty level, based on their previous experience and learning.

Students can take Leveled Coding in Tynker multiple times between grades 5 and 9. In this way, students will be able to complete several of Tynker's courses between grades 6 and 9 and can progress from block coding to line coding.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tynker Programming Lessons

Design Project

 

 

Tynker lessons will be marked for completion.

Tynker quiz scores will be referenced to check for conceptual understanding.

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student.  





 

A computer with an internet connection.  

Students will be set up with a Tynker account.  There is no extra cost for this.

 

 

ADST: Skills for Online Success 1

Course Overview: This ADST Module introduces students to many of the tools they will need to use in order to be successful in HCOS online courses. Topics covered include…

Course Overview: This ADST Module introduces students to many of the tools they will need to use in order to be successful in HCOS online courses. Topics covered include Moodle, Zoom, email, file management, screenshots, screen recording, online communication guidelines, scanning and digitizing documents, presentation programs, recording video presentations, and more. This module culminates in a final presentation.

Time Commitment: This module satisfies ⅓ of the ADST requirements for students in grades 6-9. There are 17 lessons which take between 15-45 minutes. Many of the lessons are short and practical, introducing skills that students will practice and further develop in their future studies. Most of the lessons end with review questions or a short assignment. The final project may take several hours to complete.

This module can be taken at any point in grades 5-9 which is why you will see it offered at each grade level, but please note it is the same module offered at each grade so it can only be taken once.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Email

Moodle

 

Zoom

 

File Management

 

Screenshots

 

Screen Capturing

 

Digitizing Your Work

 

Cameras and Scanners

 

Recording Yourself

 

Digital Presentations

Various small assignments
will be marked for completion

 

The final presentation will be
assessed by the teacher and
self-assessed by the student.

Computer with webcam
and microphone

 

A digital camera or scanner

 

Abbotsford Ignite Theatre CC - Theatre 5

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice…

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice and are committed to a high standard of excellence as they develop skills in acting, singing, and choreography to produce high-caliber musicals. Our educational community of committed students, talented instructors and amazing parents feel like family and together will put on six professional performances of ‘The Newsies’ in May 2021 with impressive costumes and set design. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

  • Auditions: solo song, choreography, scene work
  • Watch video clips of Disney’s Newsies to improve performance

  • Theatre Games and dramatic exercises

  • Vocal Warm-Up and Training: increase vocal range, develop pitch, lyrics, tempo, harmonies 

  • Choreography: dance movements and sequential patterns in rhythm to music with partners. Tap dance and fight scene 

  • Acting: blocking, understand the intent and purpose, mood, events, emotion and convey with appropriate body movements.

  • Character Sketch

  • Develop high and lower class New York accent  

  • Set and strive to achieve weekly goals in vocal work, choreography, scene work 

  • Stop N’ Starts addressing areas to improve.

  • Write bio for program

  • Perform in a variety of settings

  • Tour and orientation of theatre, coordinate Sets, Flys, lighting, aerials choreography, music, props and costumes to smooth out transitions. 

  • Discussion on the injustices of how the Newsies were treated.

 

Formative and summative assessment

of the Grade 5 core and course

competencies incorporating audition

evaluation form, oral presentation,

songs, choreography, performance rubric,

self-assessment, observations of growth and

working from feedback, homework assignments,

and others.


Attendance at weekly classes

September through May.

 

Completed Online Application link

and acceptance required; see the

Learning Groups website for further details.

These courses are added internally.

 

 

 

Completion of all assignments 

 

 

 

Commitment from students and parents

regarding volunteer committees and

attendance through Theatre week in May.

 

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator.

 

English 5

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program…

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program incrementally introduces a variety of writing skills and genres.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

A selection of short stories and
poems engage students in a
variety of responses designed to
increase comprehension and
higher-level thinking skills. 

2 novel studies:  Dancing Through
Snow by Jean Little and C.S Lewis’
“The Lion, the Witch and the
Wardrobe".

Writing Units;  keyword outlining
and short paragraph writing;
writing creative stories from 3
pictures to teach beginning/middle/
end story structure; report writing
to develop research report writing
skills; writing on topics I know a lot
about.


Weekly formative assessment
with 1-1 support offered
through Skype or Zoom to edit
writing or clarify skills.

Summative assessment on novel
study projects, the publication
of research report writing unit.


Novels:  “Dancing Through
Snow”by Jean Little and
C.S Lewis’ “The Lion, the
Witch and the Wardrobe”. 

Skype or Zoom chat contact

English 5

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program…

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program incrementally introduces a variety of writing skills and genres.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


A selection of short stories and
poems engage students in a
variety of responses designed to
increase comprehension and
higher-level thinking skills. 

2 novel studies:  Dancing Through
Snow by Jean Little and C.S Lewis’
“The Lion, the Witch and the
Wardrobe".

Writing Units;  keyword outlining
and short paragraph writing;
writing creative stories from 3
pictures to teach beginning/middle/
end story structure; report writing
to develop research report writing
skills; writing on topics I know a lot
about.


Weekly formative assessment
with 1-1 support offered
through Skype or Zoom to edit
writing or clarify skills.

Summative assessment on novel
study projects, the publication
of research report writing unit.


Novels:  “Dancing Through
Snow”by Jean Little and
C.S Lewis’ “The Lion, the
Witch and the Wardrobe”. 

 

Skype or Zoom chat contact

Math 5

In Math 5 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can…

In Math 5 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Fractions

  • Addition & Subtraction

  • Multiplication & Division

  • Variables

  • Area & Perimeter

  • Time

  • Shapes

  • Graphing

  • Probability

  • Financial Literacy

Students will participate in
numerous engaging hands on
projects throughout the course,
applying the concepts covered
as well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and projects. 

Project work will include
self-reflection and self-evaluation

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner:
Access to a printer is
highly suggested for
printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.


*Math 5 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last approximately
15 minutes. Students must
download Zoom

 

Math 5

In Math 5 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can…

In Math 5 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

This is the traditional online model of “any time, any pace, any place”.  The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Skype to help with questions, editing writing.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Fractions

  • Addition & Subtraction

  • Multiplication & Division

  • Variables

  • Area & Perimeter

  • Time

  • Shapes

  • Graphing

  • Probability

  • Financial Literacy

Students will participate in
numerous engaging hands on
projects throughout the course,
applying the concepts covered
as well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and projects. 

Project work will include
self-reflection and self-evaluation

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner:
Access to a printer is
highly suggested for
printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.


*Math 5 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last approximately
15 minutes. Students must
download Zoom

 

Physical and Health Education 5

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. Grade 3-5 main goals are for students to learn about adopting healthy personal practices and strategies to protect…

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. Grade 3-5 main goals are for students to learn about adopting healthy personal practices and strategies to protect ourselves and others, they are also expected to learn how movement skills and strategies help us learn how to participate in different types of physical activities and environments. The Physical and Health Education (PHE) curriculum aims to empower students to develop a personalized understanding of what healthy living means to them as individuals and members of society in the 21st century. The PHE curriculum focuses on well-being — the connections between physical, intellectual, mental, and social health.PHE is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings that students need for lifelong physical health and mental well-being.Students can apply the knowledge, processes, and skills learned to their daily lives while engaging in an exploration of what healthy living means and looks like for them. With the uniqueness of each student in mind, the curriculum facilitates a deep understanding of both physical and health literacy to provide students with the theoretical and practical foundations to embrace their interests and passions and have a healthy active lifestyle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  •  

    Daily participation in physical activity at moderate to vigorous intensity levels benefits all aspects of our well-being.

  • Movement skills and strategies help us learn how to participate in different types of physical activity.

  • Adopting healthy personal practices and safety strategies protects ourselves and others.

  • Having good communication skills and managing our emotions enables us to develop and maintain healthy relationships.

  • Our physical, emotional, and mental health are interconnected.


This is an individualized course and a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created with consideration of the resources being utilized and based on communication strategies with each family.


Resource materials for this course will be determined in conjunction with the parent, teacher, and student (when possible). 

Abbotsford CC - Grade 5

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, Arts Education 5 and Physical and Health Education 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will…

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, Arts Education 5 and Physical and Health Education 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Science: Sun, Earth and moon in space. Living things sense and respond to their environment. Matter and changing Phases. Energy Transformations.

 

Social Studies: Aspects of life of various First Nations People groups. Mapping skills. Explorers of Canada, Effects on First Nations peoples and use of Canada’s resources. Conflict and cooperation with First Nations Peoples. BC’s history in  joining Canada. Confederation.

 

Arts Education: Music including rhythm, worship songs, First Nations songs, composers and famous pieces. Visual Art including learning specific Canadian artists and First Nations techniques. Artistic projects connected to Social Studies and Science themes. 

 

Physical and Health Education: Physical literacy and skill building including kicking, hitting, aim and scoring, passing, dribbling through drills and relays. Play is the Way games and basketball, volleyball, badminton, baseball, hockey, ultimate frisbee and soccer. Exercise through the week at home and family discussions of health topics, like healthy food and body image. Social, mental and community health discussions.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

 

 

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 5 core and course competencies through varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through May.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all assignments 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Kelowna CC - Grade 5

This class will cover Science 5, Social Studies 5 and ADST 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different…

This class will cover Science 5, Social Studies 5 and ADST 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements. This class meets weekly on Wednesdays. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Social Studies: Role of Natural Resources in the Development of Canada, Impact of early Interactions on Canada’s Identity, Influences of Demographic changes in North America, BC History

 

Science: Interactions within Biomes, Matter can Change, Energy Transformations, Motion of the Earth

 

PHE: Active Living, Developing a Balanced Lifestyle, Influences on Health and Well-Being, Healthy Relationships, Developing Positive Self-Image

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the grade 5 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Langley CC - Grade 5

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, and Arts Education 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and…

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, and Arts Education 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Science: Living things in their environment. Matter and its phases. Energy Transformations. Motion of the earth and  moon and resulting patterns.

 

Social Studies: Map Skills. Canada’s natural resources. European Contact with First Peoples of Canada, Early Explorers, Fur Trade, Immigration to Canada, Canadian Railway, Gold Rush, 

 

Arts Education: Visual Art elements and techniques. Music elements and participation. Aboriginal art. Art Appreciation. Collage and texture. 

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 5 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Penticton CC - Grade 5

This weekly class will meet Thursdays and cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, PHE 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent…

This weekly class will meet Thursdays and cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, PHE 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some home activities to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

Social Studies: Legacy of Canada’s Policies for Minority Groups, Regional Impact of natural Resources, Canadian Immigration and Multicultural Impacts, Government

 

Science: Body Systems, Solutions, Simple Machines to Transfer Force and Energy, Earth Materials

 

PHE: Physical Literacy, Group Games, Balanced Lifestyle, Factors Influencing Health and Well-Being, Healthy Relationships

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the grade 5 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


 

 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through May.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Prince George CC - Grade 5

This weekly class will meet Thursdays and cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, and Arts Education 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and…

This weekly class will meet Thursdays and cover Science 5, Social Studies 5, and Arts Education 5. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some home activities to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Social Studies: Legacies of Canada’s Policies for Minorities, Regional Impact of Natural Resources on Local Identity, Influence of Immigration and Multiculturalism on Canada’s identity, Canadian Governments

 

Science: Earth Materials, Simple Machines that Transfer Force and Energy, Solutions, Body Systems

 

Arts Education: Visual Art projects connected to studies, First Nations Connections, Expressing Holidays and Special Events

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year


Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 5 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes from October through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.


  Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 
 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

Science 5

In Science 5 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 5 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, hands-on activities, experiments, projects, and more.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Biology

Students will explore the human body
and learn how different organ systems
were designed to function. The will learn
about the: digestive system, Respiratory
and circulatory systems, and the
musculoskeletal system. They will be asked
to put on their lab coats and join a team of
intern doctors on their way to diagnosing a
severely ill patient.

Unit 2: Earth Science

Our Earth is created from many materials
that change and morph as they move through
cycles and can be used as natural resources in
the different phases. In this exploration of natural
resources students will learn about: Rocks &
Minerals, Hydro Energy, Geothermal, Wind and
Solar Energy, Soil, Forestry & Forestry Products,
BC Fishing, Coal, Oil, & Gas, Trash, and
Nonrenewable resources

Unit 3: Chemistry

Students will dive into Chemistry with a study of
solutions. They’ll discover what makes a solution
and different methods to separate solutions. Then
they will explore what makes up clean water and
how we can go about finding, or making it, and
providing it for all who need it? 

Unit 4: Physics

Students will learn about the 6 different simple
machines: Incline plane, wedge, screw, levers,
wheel & axles, and pulleys. Then they’ll get a chance
to create their own compound machine.

Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

There are a variety of hands on
activities from projects to labs
which help students gain a more
concrete and practical
understanding of the content.

Activities include creating a
digestive system model using a medium
of your choice, building a water wheel,
making crystals, and designing a chore
machine using a combination of simple machines.

Student will be required a
few resources for lab activities
such as balloons, straws, pipe
cleaners, and a spring-scale.
Most of the required resources
can be found within the common
household. There is a materials
list on the course page.

Computer: Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner: Access to a
printeris highly suggested for
printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have an
email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.


*Science 5 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last approximately
15 minutes. Students must download Zoom in order to participate in
weekly meetings.

 

Science 5

In Science 5 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 5 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, hands-on activities, experiments, projects, and more.

This is the traditional Online model of “any time, any pace, any place”.  The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Skype to help with questions, editing writing.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Biology

Students will explore the human body
and learn how different organ systems
were designed to function. The will learn
about the: digestive system, Respiratory
and circulatory systems, and the
musculoskeletal system. They will be asked
to put on their lab coats and join a team of
intern doctors on their way to diagnosing a
severely ill patient.

Unit 2: Earth Science

Our Earth is created from many materials
that change and morph as they move through
cycles and can be used as natural resources in
the different phases. In this exploration of natural
resources students will learn about: Rocks &
Minerals, Hydro Energy, Geothermal, Wind and
Solar Energy, Soil, Forestry & Forestry Products,
BC Fishing, Coal, Oil, & Gas, Trash, and
Nonrenewable resources

Unit 3: Chemistry

Students will dive into Chemistry with a study of
solutions. They’ll discover what makes a solution
and different methods to separate solutions. Then
they will explore what makes up clean water and
how we can go about finding, or making it, and
providing it for all who need it? 

Unit 4: Physics

Students will learn about the 6 different simple
machines: Incline plane, wedge, screw, levers,
wheel & axles, and pulleys. Then they’ll get a chance
to create their own compound machine.

Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

There are a variety of hands on
activities from projects to labs
which help students gain a more
concrete and practical
understanding of the content.

Activities include creating a
digestive system model using a medium
of your choice, building a water wheel,
making crystals, and designing a chore
machine using a combination of simple machines.

Student will be required a
few resources for lab activities
such as balloons, straws, pipe
cleaners, and a spring-scale.
Most of the required resources
can be found within the common
household. There is a materials
list on the course page.

Computer: Laptop or Desktop

Printer/Scanner: Access to a
printeris highly suggested for
printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

Students will need to have an
email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.


 

 

French 5

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of : Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of : Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1 Language Basics:
sentence structure, everyday
items, colors and sizes, clothing
and quantities

Unit 2 Greeting and Introductions:
family relationships, around the
house, making acquaintances,
clothing.


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%

Computer and
USB headset

French 5

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of : Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of : Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1 Language Basics:
sentence structure, everyday
items, colors and sizes, clothing
and quantities

Unit 2 Greeting and Introductions:
family relationships, around the
house, making acquaintances,
clothing.


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%

Computer and
USB headset

German 5

Designed for the beginner German student in Grade 5-9 (no prerequisites). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some…

Designed for the beginner German student in Grade 5-9 (no prerequisites). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 1
(Units 1 and 2)

  • 1 activation project

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings
    with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • Rosetta Stone Level 1 (Units 1 and 2) 

  • 20 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with
Internet required

 

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

 

USB Headset with microphone

 

Mandarin 5

Mandarin 5 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 1 and 2, level 1) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story readings and live…

Mandarin 5 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 1 and 2, level 1) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story readings and live tutorials as well as cultural and FFPOL projects. Students are immersed in the world of Mandarin Chinese language and have the choice of completing the course in Pin Yin, simplified and traditional Chinese. Projects include the activation project which reflect cultural comparisons, First Peoples perspectives, social and cultural activities and an interview with a native Mandarin speaker.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Unit 1 Language Basics: 

 

Activation project, people and common activities, third-person pronouns and plurals, definite and indefinite articles, singular, plural, gendered nouns, subject-verb agreement, greetings and farewells, common foods, animals, everyday items, direct objects, negation, direct mixed-gendered “they”, using “what” to ask a question, yes/no questions, present progressive tense, adjectives, personal pronouns, colours, sizes, professions, first and second person pronouns, nouns, direct objects, quantity comparisons, numbers 1-6, household and clothing words, using “who” and “how many” to form a question, quantity comparison.

 

Creative Works Project

 

Unit 2: Greetings and Introductions

Family relationships, possessive pronouns, numbers 7-12, people’s ages, questions words, compound subjects, family relationships, household words, rooms in the house, nouns, articles, common appliances, prepositions, syllables, family relationships, discussing the self, identifying your country of origin, personal pronouns, names of several cities and countries, titles and addresses, words for city landmarks, greetings, question words, colours, predicate adjectives, articles of clothing, adjectives to describe self, personal physical states

 

Interview Project

 

 

 

 

Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their pronunciation, matching pictures to the correct phrases, writing, comprehension, games activities and listening skills. Criterion and the rubric for the activation and creative works project are found in the Moodle course.


Unit 1: Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the activation project and creative works project. Students will also have their first teacher meeting discuss any questions as they start the course. 

 

Unit 2:  Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the interview project where students interview a native Mandarin Chinese speaker. Students will also have their general, live teacher meetings to  review their progress in Moodle to ensure that all components outlined in the course are completed and they have submitted completion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish 5

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 1 – Language Basics

UNIT 2 – Greetings and Introductions


 

  • Activation: acquiring some basic food vocabulary to begin the course

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

More details on assessment and activities described above can be found here.

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 20 minutes for lessons followed by at least 10 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Spanish 5

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 1 – Language Basics

UNIT 2 – Greetings and Introductions


 

  • Activation: acquiring some basic food vocabulary to begin the course

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

More details on assessment and activities described above can be found here.

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 20 minutes for lessons followed by at least 10 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Social Studies 5

This course focuses on the way God shaped Canada through historical events and the people involved, and through the unique geographical factors which are Canada.  Students will…

This course focuses on the way God shaped Canada through historical events and the people involved, and through the unique geographical factors which are Canada.  Students will use the textbook Connections Canada (Oxford publishers) as a base for introducing and understanding the story of Canada’s early development.  A variety of learning activities and responses will encourage students to empathize with the people who experienced these events and to express their learning in assignments and in their actions.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Introduction:
Coming Together - concepts
of “being Canadian”

Unit 1 Canda’s Founding People: 
Their culture

Unit 2 Coming to Canada:
 Immigration, researching family
story

Unit 3 Government: 1st Nations
government

Unit 4: Communities

Unit 5: Transportation and
Communication

Unit 6: Resources of Canada

Unit 7 Renewing our world


Weekly formative assessment
and student reflection

Summative assessment in
completion of unit projects


Connections Canada
(Oxford publishers)

Skype or Zoom contact

Social Studies 5

This course focuses on the way God shaped Canada through historical events and the people involved, and through the unique geographical factors which are Canada.  Students will use…

This course focuses on the way God shaped Canada through historical events and the people involved, and through the unique geographical factors which are Canada.  Students will use the textbook Connections Canada (Oxford publishers) as a base for introducing and understanding the story of Canada’s early development.  A variety of learning activities and responses will encourage students to empathize with the people who experienced these events and to express their learning in assignments and in their actions.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Introduction:
Coming Together - concepts
of “being Canadian”

Unit 1 Canda’s Founding People: 
Their culture

Unit 2 Coming to Canada:
 Immigration, researching family
story

Unit 3 Government: 1st Nations
government

Unit 4: Communities

Unit 5: Transportation and
Communication

Unit 6: Resources of Canada

Unit 7 Renewing our world


Weekly formative assessment
and student reflection

Summative assessment in
completion of unit projects


Connections Canada
(Oxford publishers)

Skype or Zoom contact

ADST 6-9: Design Thinking Through Minecraft

In this ADST module, students will have the opportunity to use their imagination and design skills to think creatively to solve given problems. There is no official start date so…

In this ADST module, students will have the opportunity to use their imagination and design skills to think creatively to solve given problems. There is no official start date so students will follow their own pace and schedule that can be set up in Encom. It is suggested to complete it in 8 weeks.

They will explore the design thinking process using the 3D digital environment known as Minecraft.  Note: Although Minecraft is the technology students will be using, this is not a course on how to play Minecraft. Minecraft will be the tool students use to learn and demonstrate the “Design Thinking” process.

In each lesson, students are given a mission to design a plan to solve a challenge in various Minecraft settings. They will learn to use the steps from the design process to plan, test, improve, and share their finished products.

This module can be taken at any point in grades 6-9 which is why you will see it offered at each grade level, but please note it is the same module offered at each grade so can only be taken once.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

For the 5 missions, students will:

  1. Be inspired to create an invention focusing on a problem to solve, and share the invention and its purpose in Minecraft.

  2. Investigate how the concept of slope affects the building of a roller coaster.

  3. Design and build a 3D maze (powered with redstone) that challenges players to answer questions about digital citizenship.

  4. Research and then build a model/replica of an historical/real life /landmark/object.

  5. Design and build a self-sustaining home or vehicle that can survive an alien world.

 

 

 

 

Rubrics for each mission focus on how well students describe (in a PDF worksheet or in a live Zoom meeting) their process for each design thinking step.

Requirements:

Since HCOS no longer uses its own server, this module has been adapted so that students can use their own version of Minecraft (Java, Xbox, Pocket). All missions are done in “creative” mode.

 

Assignments use PDFs for worksheets so Adobe Acrobat Reader will be needed to submit assignments in Moodle.

 

Screenshots of the builds in Minecraft will also be needed unless students book a Zoom meeting with the instructor to show their builds live on the screen.

 

ADST 6-9: Lego Robotics 1

This ADST Module will introduce students to the Lego Mindstorm EV3 robotics kit and block-based coding. Students will build robots from instructions, will program a driving base,…

This ADST Module will introduce students to the Lego Mindstorm EV3 robotics kit and block-based coding. Students will build robots from instructions, will program a driving base, and will be introduced to the various sensors and motors in the kit. Using the Design Process, students will build their own emergency response robot for their final project.

Time Commitment: There are 18 lessons in this module. Most lessons are less than one hour long, including time to build with Lego. Some lessons are shorter (less than 30 minutes) while a few will require a student to build a larger robot, which could take several hours. 

Important:  Students will be able to borrow the Lego Mindstorm Kit from the Learning Commons for 8 weeks only. Because of this, students will need to complete this module in 8 weeks. 

This module can be taken at any point in grades 6, 7, 8, or 9 which is why you will see it offered at each grade level, but please note it is the same module offered at each grade so it can only be taken once.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

What is a Robot?

Building Lego from Plans

Using Motors and Sensors

Introduction to Lego Programming

The Design Process

Final Design Project

 

 

 

 


 

Written assignment on Sensors and Actuators

Video submissions of Lego builds and challenges

Research on the making of products

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student




 


A computer with a webcam and microphone and highspeed internet connection.  

Students will need to install the Lego programming software.  This course works best on PCs. Please contact the course teacher if you do not have access to a PC and would like to take this course. 

Students will be able to reserve one of our Lego Kits for 8 weeks during the year for no extra cost.  There is a limited number of kits available. Please contact the course teacher to inquire about availability.    

 

 

 

ADST 6: Leveled Coding in Tynker

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools. Students will start with an introduction to…

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools.

Students will start with an introduction to Tynker, learning how to use Tynker's tools to create their own coding projects. Following this introduction students will complete one of Tynker's leveled courses, checking in with the course teacher, whom they can access for help and support along the way. The module will conclude when students complete a design challenge in Tynker's "Blank Project" workspace.

At the beginning of the module, students will meet with the module teacher to decide which Tynker course to complete. This will ensure that students are working at the right difficulty level, based on their previous experience and learning.

Students can take Leveled Coding in Tynker multiple times between grades 5 and 9. In this way, students will be able to complete several of Tynker's courses between grades 6 and 9 and can progress from block coding to line coding.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tynker Programming Lessons

Design Project

 

 

Tynker lessons will be marked for completion.

Tynker quiz scores will be referenced to check for conceptual understanding.

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student.  





 

A computer with an internet connection.  

Students will be set up with a Tynker account.  There is no extra cost for this.

 

 

ADST Foods 1

Food, fun and learning. This hands-on course is filled with information about food safety, nutrition and practical food preparation and cooking skills. Major Units and…

Food, fun and learning. This hands-on course is filled with information about food safety, nutrition and practical food preparation and cooking skills.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will learn the basics of food preparation, nutrition, consumer awareness, plus some simple cooking and baking skills. Using elements of the design process, they will prepare, sample, and tweak recipes to create their own custom muffins to share with friends and family.

In the activities of the course, students will follow and apply the design process, which includes defining, ideating, prototyping, testing, making, and sharing.

Students final products will be assessed according to the design product rubric. The product is assessed based on its value, originality, and style.




 

Students will need access to basic cooking equipment in a home kitchen, and will need to purchase ingredients.

Students will need a computer with internet access to access course content, including streaming videos. Students may choose to print recipes or follow them on their device. 

Students will need a camera or cell phone with a camera to take photographs of some projects and activities.

Time Commitment:
This course consists of 13 lessons, varying in length from approximately 1-2 hours. Longer lessons may be completed over two days.

 

 

 

ADST Foods 2

Students will jump right into cooking in this action-packed, breakfast-themed cooking course. Learn about basic nutrition and savvy shopping, then design a custom brunch for…

Students will jump right into cooking in this action-packed, breakfast-themed cooking course. Learn about basic nutrition and savvy shopping, then design a custom brunch for friends and family using the skills and recipes you have learned.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will learn the basics of food preparation, nutrition, consumer awareness, plus some simple cooking and baking skills. Using elements of the design process, they will prepare, sample, and tweak recipes to create their own custom brunch to share with friends and family.

In the activities of the course, students will follow and apply the design process, which includes defining, ideating, prototyping, testing, making, and sharing.

Students final products will be assessed according to the design product rubric. The product is assessed based on its value, originality, and style.




 

Students will need access to basic cooking equipment in a home kitchen, and will need to purchase ingredients.

Students will need a computer with internet access to access course content, including streaming videos. Students may choose to print recipes or follow them on their device. 

Students will need a camera or cell phone with a camera to take photographs of some projects and activities.

Time Commitment:
This course consists of 13 lessons, varying in length from approximately 1-2 hours. Longer lessons may be completed over two days.

 

 

 

Abbotsford Ignite Theatre CC - Theatre 6

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice…

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice and are committed to a high standard of excellence as they develop skills in acting, singing, and choreography to produce high-caliber musicals. Our educational community of committed students, talented instructors and amazing parents feel like family and together will put on six professional performances of ‘The Newsies’ in May 2021 with impressive costumes and set design. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

  • Auditions: solo song, choreography, scene work
  • Watch video clips of Disney’s Newsies to improve performance

  • Theatre Games and dramatic exercises

  • Vocal Warm-Up and Training: increase vocal range, develop pitch, lyrics, tempo, harmonies 

  • Choreography: dance movements and sequential patterns in rhythm to music with partners. Tap dance and fight scene 

  • Acting: blocking, understand the intent and purpose, mood, events, emotion and convey with appropriate body movements.

  • Character Sketch

  • Develop high and lower class New York accent  

  • Set and strive to achieve weekly goals in vocal work, choreography, scene work 

  • Stop N’ Starts addressing areas to improve.

  • Write bio for program

  • Perform in a variety of settings

  • Tour and orientation of theatre, coordinate Sets, Flys, lighting, aerials choreography, music, props and costumes to smooth out transitions. 

  • Discussion on the injustices of how the Newsies were treated.

 

Formative and summative assessment

of the Grade 6 core and course

competencies incorporating audition

evaluation form, oral presentation,

songs, choreography, performance rubric,

self-assessment, observations of growth and

working from feedback, homework assignments,

and others.


Attendance at weekly classes

September through May.

 

Completed Online Application link

and acceptance required; see the

Learning Groups website for further details.

These courses are added internally.

 

 

 

Completion of all assignments 

 

 

 

Commitment from students and parents

regarding volunteer committees and

attendance through Theatre week in May.

 

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator.

 

Bible 6

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements Bible 6 is a study of 12 Christian doctrines.  A doctrine is a set of beliefs and practices common…
Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Bible 6 is a study of 12 Christian doctrines.  A doctrine is a set of beliefs

and practices common to a group of people.  Even though there are some

differences in how various churches do things, or differences in what they

believe it means to be a follower of Jesus, there are several common

beliefs that nearly all Christians worldwide have agreed upon through the

years.  This course will look at the following Christian doctrines: 

Bible, God, Jesus, Holy Spirit, Sin, Salvation, Church, Future Things, Angels

and Demons, Satan/Hell, Prayer, Communion and Baptism. 

Individual weekly assignments - 50% of the course mark

3 comprehensive quizzes - 20% of the course mark

Doctrinal Book Project – 15% of the course mark

Memorization Project – 15% of the course mark

Each doctrine will be studied over a period of 2 weeks. 

There will be 3 comprehensive quizzes through the course. 

In the 2 week study students will hear an audio message

from the writer of the course, memorize a portion of Scripture,

read and respond to a lesson, watch and respond to a relevant

video clip, do an activity, work on a major course project and

participate in their own personal devotional time.

 The course is designed to take approximately 15 minutes/day, 5 days a week. 

English 6A

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program…

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program incrementally introduces a variety of writing skills and genres.

This course is designed for students who DID NOT TAKE Online English 5

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

A selection of short stories and poems engage students in a
variety of responses designed to
increase comprehension and
higher-level thinking skills. 

2 novel studies:  “Holes” by
Louis Sacher and “Anne of
Green Gables” by LM
Montgomery.

Writing Units;  keyword
outlining and 3 paragraph
writing; writing creative fables;
report writing to develop
research report writing skills;
writing on topics I know a lot about

Weekly formative assessment
with 1-1 support offered
through Skype or Zoom to edit
writing or clarify skills.

Summative assessment on
novel study projects, the publication of research
report writing unit.

“Holes” by Louis Sacher

and “Anne of Green Gables”
by LM Montgomery.

Zoom or Skype contact

English 6A

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program…

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program incrementally introduces a variety of writing skills and genres.

This course is designed for students who did not take Online English 5

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


A selection of short stories and
poems engage students in a
variety of responses designed to
increase comprehension and
higher-level thinking skills. 

2 novel studies:  “Holes” by
Louis Sacher and “Anne of
Green Gables” by LM
Montgomery.

Writing Units;  keyword
outlining and 3 paragraph
writing; writing creative fables;
report writing to develop
research report writing skills;
writing on topics I know a lot about


Weekly formative assessment
with 1-1 support offered
through Skype or Zoom to edit
writing or clarify skills.

Summative assessment on
novel study projects, the publication of research
report writing unit.


“Holes” by Louis Sacher
and “Anne of Green Gables”
by LM Montgomery.

Zoom or Skype contact

English 6B

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program…

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program incrementally introduces a variety of writing skills and genres.

This course is designed for students who have previously completed the Online English 5 course.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


A selection of short stories and
poems engage students in a
variety of responses designed to
increase comprehension and
higher-level thinking skills. 

2 novel studies:  “Holes” by
Louis Sacher and “Anne of
Green Gables” by LM
Montgomery.

Writing Units;  keyword
outlining and 3 paragraph
writing; writing creative fables;
report writing to develop
research report writing skills;
writing on topics I know a lot about


Weekly formative assessment
with 1-1 support offered
through Skype or Zoom to edit
writing or clarify skills.

Summative assessment on
novel study projects, the publication of research
report writing unit.


“Holes” by Louis Sacher
and “Anne of Green Gables”
by LM Montgomery.

Zoom or Skype contact

English 6B

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program…

This course focuses on a variety of reading strategies designed to increase comprehension and engagement with various elements of the story.  The structured writing program incrementally introduces a variety of writing skills and genres.

This course is designed for students who have previously completed Online English 5

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


A selection of short stories and
poems engage students in a
variety of responses designed to
increase comprehension and
higher-level thinking skills. 

2 novel studies:  “Holes” by
Louis Sacher and “Anne of
Green Gables” by LM
Montgomery.

Writing Units;  keyword
outlining and 3 paragraph
writing; writing creative fables;
report writing to develop
research report writing skills;
writing on topics I know a lot about


Weekly formative assessment
with 1-1 support offered
through Skype or Zoom to edit
writing or clarify skills.

Summative assessment on
novel study projects, the publication of research
report writing unit.


“Holes” by Louis Sacher
and “Anne of Green Gables”
by LM Montgomery.

Zoom or Skype contact

Math 6

In Math 6 there are twelve units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students…

In Math 6 there are twelve units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Multiplication & Division

  • Order of Operations

  • Factors & Multiples

  • Percentages

  • Patterns

  • One-Step Equations

  • Perimeter & Area

  • Volume & Capacity

  • Angles

  • Transformations & Line Graphs

  • Probability

Students will participate in numerous
engaging hands on projects throughout
the course, applying the concepts
covered as well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and projects.

Project work will include
self reflection and self-
evaluation.

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner: Access
to a printer is highly
suggested for printing of
lesson notes, assignments
and projects. Work will
also need to be scanned
and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.


*Math 6 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last approximately
15 minutes. Students must
download Zoom in order to
participate in weekly meetings.

 

Math 6

In Math 6 there are twelve units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students…

In Math 6 there are twelve units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

This is the traditional online model of “any time, any pace, any place”.  The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Skype to help with questions, editing writing.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Multiplication & Division

  • Order of Operations

  • Factors & Multiples

  • Percentages

  • Patterns

  • One-Step Equations

  • Perimeter & Area

  • Volume & Capacity

  • Angles

  • Transformations & Line Graphs

  • Probability

Students will participate in numerous
engaging hands on projects throughout
the course, applying the concepts
covered as well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and projects.

Project work will include
self reflection and self-
evaluation.

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner: Access
to a printer is highly
suggested for printing of
lesson notes, assignments
and projects. Work will
also need to be scanned
and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.

 

 

Physical and Health Education 6

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. The Grade 6-9 main goals are for students to learn how healthy choices influence our physical, emotional and mental…

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. The Grade 6-9 main goals are for students to learn how healthy choices influence our physical, emotional and mental well-being and gain understanding of how physical literacy and fitness contribute to our successes and enjoyment in physical activity. The Physical and Health Education (PHE) curriculum aims to empower students to develop a personalized understanding of what healthy living means to them as individuals and members of society in the 21st century. The PHE curriculum focuses on well-being — the connections between physical, intellectual, mental, and social health.PHE is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings that students need for lifelong physical health and mental well-being.Students can apply the knowledge, processes, and skills learned to their daily lives while engaging in an exploration of what healthy living means and looks like for them. With the uniqueness of each student in mind, the curriculum facilitates a deep understanding of both physical and health literacy to provide students with the theoretical and practical foundations to embrace their interests and passions and have a healthy active lifestyle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  •  

    Daily physical activity enables us to practice skillful movement and helps us develop personal fitness.

  • Physical literacy and fitness contribute to our success in and enjoyment of physical activity.

  • We experience many changes in our lives that influence how we see ourselves and others.

  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

  • Learning about similarities and differences in individuals and groups influences community health.


This is an individualized course and a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created with consideration of the resources being utilized and based on communication strategies with each family.


Resource materials for this course will be determined in conjunction with the parent, teacher, and student (when possible). 

Abbotsford CC - Grade 6

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 6, Social Studies 6, and Physical and Health Education 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied…

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 6, Social Studies 6, and Physical and Health Education 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements.  For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Social Studies: Conflict Caused by Economic Self-interest, Global Issues, Systems of Government, Impact of Media

 

 

Science: Human Body, Everyday Mixtures, Newton’s Three Laws and Balancing Forces, Solar System

 

PHE: Active Living, Building Physical Literacy and Fitness, Impact of Change, How healthy Choices influence Well-Being, Inclusion and Empathy in Communities

Developing skills in kicking, hitting, aim and scoring, passing, dribbling. Play is the Way games and soccer, basketball, volleyball, badminton, baseball, dodgeball, California kickball, and hockey. Exercise through the week at home and family discussions of health topics. The FITT and SAID principles. Healthy food and body image. Social, mental and community health discussions.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

 

 

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 6 core and course competencies through varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through May.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all assignments 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Kelowna CC - Grade 6

This class will cover Science 6, Social Studies 6 and PHE 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different…

This class will cover Science 6, Social Studies 6 and PHE 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements. This class meets weekly on Wednesdays. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

Social Studies: Conflict Caused by Economic Self-interest, Global Issues, Systems of Government, Impact of Media

 

Science: Human Body, Everyday Mixtures, Newton’s Three Laws and Balancing Forces, Solar System

 

PHE:Active Living, Building Physical Literacy and Fitness, Impact of Change, How healthy Choices influence Well-Being, Inclusion and Empathy in Communities

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the grade 6 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Langley CC - Grade 6

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 6, Social Studies 6, and Applied Design, Skills and Technology 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate…

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 6, Social Studies 6, and Applied Design, Skills and Technology 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements.  For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

Science: Newton’s Laws of Motion. Astronomy/Our Solar System. Mixtures in Chemistry. Systems of Multicellular organisms and interaction with the environment.

 

Social Studies: Systems of government. Urbanization and migration. Regional and International conflict.  Economic policies and resource management, including effects on indigenous peoples. Effects of Media. 

 

Choice of one ADST below

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (A): Woodworking. Sewing and Crocheting. Moodle course ADST: Introduction to ADST and the Design Process

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (B):

Coding and Computer Programming. Robotics using Dash. Computers and Communications Devices with 3D printing.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 6 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Prince George CC - Grade 6

This weekly class will meet Thursdays and cover Science 6, Social Studies 6, and Arts Education 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and…

This weekly class will meet Thursdays and cover Science 6, Social Studies 6, and Arts Education 6. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some home activities to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

Social Studies: Legacies of Canada’s Policies for Minorities, Regional Impact of Natural Resources on Local Identity, Influence of Immigration and Multiculturalism on Canada’s identity, Canadian Governments

 

Science: Earth Materials, Simple Machines that Transfer Force and Energy, Solutions, Body Systems

 

Arts Education: Visual Art projects connected to studies, First Nations Connections, Expressing Holidays and Special Events

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year


Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 6 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes from October through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.


  Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 
 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

Science 6

In Science 6 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 6 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, hands-on activities, experiments, projects, and more.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Biology

Eww! Gross! This unit is sure to
be a favorite for students as we
explore our amazingly designed
human bodies and discuss why
‘gross’ isn’t gross, but is totally
natural and expected! Students
will explore puberty and all that
it means for both boys and girls.

Unit 2: Physics

We’ll explore Newton’s Three laws
of Physics, and apply them to the
idea of cars and seatbelts to
determine if it’s a wise choice to
wear or not wear a seatbelt. 

Unit 3: Chemistry

Do we have any food lovers?
Whether you are or you aren’t, we
all need food to survive, and even
better if it tastes good! Students will
apply their Chemistry learning to
create a cookbook called, Mix-It-Up
– Cooking with Chemistry, involving
both homogeneous and
heterogeneous mixtures, as well as
separated mixtures. 

Unit 4: Earth Science

Come explore our universe, created
and held in the palm of God’s hand. 
Students will enjoy journeying
throughout this vast space. With a
focus on the Milky Way and its parts,
this unit starts off with an extreme
environment on Earth that bridges the
gap between Earth and Space. We then
move beyond Earth to explore the
planets and other components of the Universe.

Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

There are a variety of hands on
activities from projects to
experiments, which help
students gain a more concrete
and practical understanding of
the content.

Each unit includes an intriguing
project that applies to the topic.
Projects include: Puberty
Survival Kit, Seatbelt Activist
Project, Cooking with Chemistry
Cookbook, and Solar System Survival Guide.


Student will require a
few resources for hands-
on activities. Most of the
required resources can be
found within the common household. There is a list
of materials on the course
page.

Printer/Scanner: Access to
a printer is highly suggested
for printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

Students will need to have an
email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.

 

*Science 6 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last approximately
15 minutes. Students must
download Zoomin order to
participate in weekly meetings. 

 

Science 6

In Science 6 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 6 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, hands-on activities, experiments, projects, and more.

This is the traditional online model of “any time, any pace, any place”. The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Skype to help with questions, editing writing. 

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Biology

Eww! Gross! This unit is sure to
be a favorite for students as we
explore our amazingly designed
human bodies and discuss why
‘gross’ isn’t gross, but is totally
natural and expected! Students
will explore puberty and all that
it means for both boys and girls.

Unit 2: Physics

We’ll explore Newton’s Three laws
of Physics, and apply them to the
idea of cars and seatbelts to
determine if it’s a wise choice to
wear or not wear a seatbelt. 

Unit 3: Chemistry

Do we have any food lovers?
Whether you are or you aren’t, we
all need food to survive, and even
better if it tastes good! Students will
apply their Chemistry learning to
create a cookbook called, Mix-It-Up
– Cooking with Chemistry, involving
both homogeneous and
heterogeneous mixtures, as well as
separated mixtures. 

Unit 4: Earth Science

Come explore our universe, created
and held in the palm of God’s hand. 
Students will enjoy journeying
throughout this vast space. With a
focus on the Milky Way and its parts,
this unit starts off with an extreme
environment on Earth that bridges the
gap between Earth and Space. We then
move beyond Earth to explore the
planets and other components of the Universe.

Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

There are a variety of hands on
activities from projects to
experiments, which help
students gain a more concrete
and practical understanding of
the content.

Each unit includes an intriguing
project that applies to the topic.
Projects include: Puberty
Survival Kit, Seatbelt Activist
Project, Cooking with Chemistry
Cookbook, and Solar System Survival Guide.


Student will require a
few resources for hands-
on activities. Most of the
required resources can be
found within the common household. There is a list
of materials on the course
page.

Printer/Scanner: Access to
a printer is highly suggested
for printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

Students will need to have an
email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.

 

*Science 6 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last approximately
15 minutes. Students must
download Zoomin order to
participate in weekly meetings. 

 

French 6

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 3: Work and School:
Locations and Times of Day,
Senses and Body Parts,
Languages, Daily routines

Unit 4: Shopping: Landmarks
and Directions, Currency, Cost,
and Preferences, Materials and
Merchandise, Comparing and
Contrasting.


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


1 year of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

French 6

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 3: Work and School:
Locations and Times of Day,
Senses and Body Parts,
Languages, Daily routines

Unit 4: Shopping: Landmarks
and Directions, Currency, Cost,
and Preferences, Materials and
Merchandise, Comparing and
Contrasting.


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


1 year of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

German 6

Designed for the beginner German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level A (prerequisite: German Level A). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta…

Designed for the beginner German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level A (prerequisite: German Level A). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 1
(Units 3 and 4)

  • 1 activation project (2 parts)

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings
    with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • Rosetta Stone Level 1
    (Units 3 and 4) 

  • 20 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with
Internet required

 

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

 

USB Headset with microphone

 

Mandarin 6

Mandarin 6 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 3 and 4, level 1) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story readings and live…

Mandarin 6 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 3 and 4, level 1) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story readings and live tutorials as well as cultural and FFPOL projects. Students are immersed in the world of Mandarin Chinese language and have the choice of completing the course in Pin Yin, simplified and traditional Chinese. Projects include the activation project which reflect cultural comparisons, First Peoples perspectives, social and cultural activities and an interview with a native Mandarin speaker.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Unit 3 Work and School: 

 

Activation project, workplaces, times of day and time-of-day greetings, question words: “when” and “where, ”time- and place-related prepositions, numbers 13-20, calendar time, days of the week, polite language, preposition: “with”, visiting a friend, parts of the body, sensory words, languages user speaks/does not speak, numbers 21-69 names of languages, reflexive verbs, morning washing routine, bedroom and bathroom objects, new adjectives

 

Creative Works Project


Unit 4 Shopping:

Shopping, names of several stores, things commonly bought, verbs about places and objects, express likes and dislikes, compare things, things to do around town, sports, cost of items, common currencies, common shopping phrases, different forms of payment, describing objects one shops for, comparatives, quantity, comparison words, shopping

 

Interview Project

 

 

Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their pronunciation, matching pictures to the correct phrases, writing, comprehension, games activities and listening skills. Criterion and the rubric for the activation and creative works project are found in the Moodle course.

Unit 3: Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the activation project and creative works project. Students will also have their first teacher meeting discuss any questions as they start the course.

Unit 4:  Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and  story recordings along with the interview project where students interview a native Mandarin Chinese speaker. Students will also have their final, general live teacher meeting to  review their progress in Moodle to ensure that all components outlined in the course are completed and they have submitted completion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish 6

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 3 – Work and School 

UNIT 4 – Shopping


 

  • Activation: acquiring some basic clothing vocabulary to begin the course

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 20 minutes for lessons followed by at least 10 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Spanish 6

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 3 – Work and School 

UNIT 4 – Shopping


 

  • Activation: acquiring some basic clothing vocabulary to begin the course

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 20 minutes for lessons followed by at least 10 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Social Studies 6

Since God is the Author of life, the Creator of Heaven and Earth, this course looks at His Work and asks, “What is His Good Purpose?”  We will explore various concepts of…

Since God is the Author of life, the Creator of Heaven and Earth, this course looks at His Work and asks, “What is His Good Purpose?”  We will explore various concepts of Geography/ History as they shape and inform culture. We will examine Canada and compare with other countries in our wonderful world.  We will use various online sources for information to gain insight into how other people live and look at life, beginning to understand how our worldview shapes our lives.  Students will complete a variety of assignments and projects to share their learning and be challenged to consider what they are reading and thinking with a Christian worldview.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Module1. Canada

A brief overview of our
history and geography;
learning to use online
resources. Culminates in
a summative project.

Module 2. Global Village

 Investigating Japanese
culture.  Culminates in an
investigation project of
another culture. 

Module 3. Aspects that
Shape our lives: Economy
Water Resources;

Cities - examination of
concepts of poverty- its causes,
effects. Students are invited to
design a project that makes a
difference after learning about
our precious water resources.
Students investigate and share
their learning about a major
city of their choice.

Module 4. Government

Includes a look at Indigenous
and Inuit stories; structure of
Canada’s government and
comparison to China’s
government system.


Weekly formative assessment
and student reflection

Summative assessment in
completion of unit projects


Skype or Zoom contact

Good internet access

 

Social Studies 6

Since God is the Author of life, the Creator of Heaven and Earth, this course looks at His Work and asks, “What is His Good Purpose?”  We will explore various concepts of…

Since God is the Author of life, the Creator of Heaven and Earth, this course looks at His Work and asks, “What is His Good Purpose?”  We will explore various concepts of Geography/ History as they shape and inform culture. We will examine Canada and compare with other countries in our wonderful world.  We will use various online sources for information to gain insight into how other people live and look at life, beginning to understand how our worldview shapes our lives.  Students will complete a variety of assignments and projects to share their learning and be challenged to consider what they are reading and thinking with a Christian worldview.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Module1. Canada

A brief overview of our
history and geography;
learning to use online
resources. Culminates in
a summative project.

Module 2. Global Village

 Investigating Japanese
culture.  Culminates in an
investigation project of
another culture. 

Module 3. Aspects that
Shape our lives: Economy
Water Resources;

Cities - examination of
concepts of poverty- its causes,
effects. Students are invited to
design a project that makes a
difference after learning about
our precious water resources.
Students investigate and share
their learning about a major
city of their choice.

Module 4. Government

Includes a look at Indigenous
and Inuit stories; structure of
Canada’s government and
comparison to China’s
government system.


Weekly formative assessment
and student reflection

Summative assessment in
completion of unit projects


Skype or Zoom contact

Good internet access

 

ADST 7: Leveled Coding in Tynker

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools. Students will start with an introduction to…

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools.

Students will start with an introduction to Tynker, learning how to use Tynker's tools to create their own coding projects. Following this introduction students will complete one of Tynker's leveled courses, checking in with the course teacher, whom they can access for help and support along the way. The module will conclude when students complete a design challenge in Tynker's "Blank Project" workspace.

At the beginning of the module, students will meet with the module teacher to decide which Tynker course to complete. This will ensure that students are working at the right difficulty level, based on their previous experience and learning.

Students can take Leveled Coding in Tynker multiple times between grades 5 and 9. In this way, students will be able to complete several of Tynker's courses between grades 6 and 9 and can progress from block coding to line coding.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tynker Programming Lessons

Design Project

 

 

Tynker lessons will be marked for completion.

Tynker quiz scores will be referenced to check for conceptual understanding.

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student.  





 

A computer with an internet connection.  

Students will be set up with a Tynker account.  There is no extra cost for this.

 

 

TechLAB 7-9

The name TechLAB stands for the three subjects that are covered by this hybrid program: ADST (Applied Design, Skills, and Technology), English Language Arts, and Bible. Put those…

The name TechLAB stands for the three subjects that are covered by this hybrid program: ADST (Applied Design, Skills, and Technology), English Language Arts, and Bible. Put those together, and you get TechLAB .

Technology is the focus of TechLAB, with students learning about coding, robotics, electronics, and how to use online programs and tools. While that is awesome, what’s even better is that students will also complete English Language Arts and Bible while creating projects, following instructions, making presentations, reading a techy novel, considering poetry written by bots, researching the ethics of AI, and discussing global technology issues, and more. TechLAB has been designed for students who are interested in technology. If your child struggles with motivation to read, write, or engage thoughtfully with their schoolwork, the topics and assignments in TechLAB will grab their attention as they think about the future, the world, and technology. Furthermore, many assignments in TechLAB are submitted in video format, helping students grow in both written and verbal communication skills as they relate to technology.

TechLAB encourages students to think of their role in the world and body of Christ as creative people, made in the image of God. Students will read and write about God the Father as creator, the Holy Spirit who lives within us, and Jesus and the power of his grace. Stewardship and ethics are touched on several times throughout the year. Each week, there is an optional class meeting on Zoom, where students will discuss technology and current events, tackle coding problems together, pray for needs, discuss Biblical themes, encourage each other, and can ask questions about the course material and get help with projects and lessons. These meetings are intended to enrich your student’s learning and provide additional support. Student attendance at these online meetings is not required.

The world is becoming increasingly technological. TechLAB will help to prepare your student to be a thoughtful and skilled participant in the digital world that is emerging. TechLAB can be completed only once in grades 7,8,or 9.

This module can be taken at any point in grades 7-9 which is why you will see it offered at each grade level, but please note it is the same module offered at each grade so it can only be taken once.

Asynchronous option: This is the traditional Online model of “any time, any pace, any place.” The student works on the course independently. In TechLAB, students can choose the order in which they work on their modules. The teacher is available on Zoom to help with questions, troubleshoot coding problems, and develop writing skills. While asynchronous students will be greatly encouraged to join the weekly Zoom meetings, these meetings will be optional for students who choose to do the course at their own pace.

Synchronous: The first 15 minutes of the weekly Zoom meeting will introduce the lessons and assignments for the week, give instructions, and clarify expectations. Synchronous students commit to keeping pace with the class and to attending at least the first 15 minutes of the weekly meeting. While synchronous students will be greatly encouraged to stay for the rest of the meeting, the next 45 minutes of the meeting are optional. 

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Time Commitment: TechLAB meets the requirements for three subjects in one set of assignments and lessons. As a result, TechLAB requires a significant commitment of time and energy. Students should plan to work on TechLAB for 4-7 hours per week, for 32 weeks. However, because working with Lego, coding games, and building circuits can be great fun and is highly challenging, it is not uncommon for students to spend many extra hours bringing their design ideas to life. While this can add on a lot of time, the experience is enriching and satisfying for students.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Technology Modules

In the first week of classes, students will

choose three of the following ADST Modules

to complete during the year:

  • Skills for Online Success
  • Lego Robotics 1
  • Lego Robotics 2
  • Leveled Coding with Tynker
  • Arduino

Core Modules

These modules teach specific English and

ADST competencies and delve into Biblical

Attributes and worldview.

  • Getting Started
  • Coding and Poetry
  • Novel Study
  • The Designer’s Toolbox
  • Designer Biographies
  • Technology and the Future: Essay Writing
 

 

Video submissions of robotics projects and

presentations in Flipgrid.

 

Written paragraphs, reports, short answers,

creative writing assignments, and essays.

 

Each step of the design process will be

assessed by the teacher and the student’s

self-assessment.

 

Final projects will be assessed by the

teacher and student

 

Rubrics are used throughout

the course.

A computer, webcam, microphone and

high-speed internet connection.

 

Choice of two novels:

  • Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s

Library by Chris Grabenstein

  • The Giver by Lois Lowry

 

Students who choose to complete the

Arduino module will need to purchase the

Arduino Starter Kit (approximately $125).

Students can use curriculum funds to purchase

the Arduino Starter Kit.

 

Students who choose to complete one of the

Lego Robotics modules will be able to

reserve one of our Lego Kits for 8 weeks during

the year for no extra cost. The Lego Software

works best on PC’s. Please contact the teacher if

you do not have access to a PC and would

like to take this course.

 

Students who choose to complete the Tynker module

will be set up with a Tynker account at no extra cost.

Abbotsford Ignite Theatre CC - Theatre 7

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice…

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice and are committed to a high standard of excellence as they develop skills in acting, singing, and choreography to produce high-caliber musicals. Our educational community of committed students, talented instructors and amazing parents feel like family and together will put on six professional performances of ‘The Newsies’ in May 2021 with impressive costumes and set design. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

  • Auditions: solo song, choreography, scene work
  • Watch video clips of Disney’s Newsies to improve performance

  • Theatre Games and dramatic exercises

  • Vocal Warm-Up and Training: increase vocal range, develop pitch, lyrics, tempo, harmonies 

  • Choreography: dance movements and sequential patterns in rhythm to music with partners. Tap dance and fight scene 

  • Acting: blocking, understand the intent and purpose, mood, events, emotion and convey with appropriate body movements.

  • Character Sketch

  • Develop high and lower class New York accent  

  • Set and strive to achieve weekly goals in vocal work, choreography, scene work 

  • Stop N’ Starts addressing areas to improve.

  • Write bio for program

  • Perform in a variety of settings

  • Tour and orientation of theatre, coordinate Sets, Flys, lighting, aerials choreography, music, props and costumes to smooth out transitions. 

  • Discussion on the injustices of how the Newsies were treated.

 

Formative and summative assessment

of the Grade 7 core and course

competencies incorporating audition

evaluation form, oral presentation,

songs, choreography, performance rubric,

self-assessment, observations of growth and

working from feedback, homework assignments,

and others.


Attendance at weekly classes

September through May.

 

Completed Online Application link

and acceptance required; see the

Learning Groups website for further details.

These courses are added internally.

 

 

 

Completion of all assignments 

 

 

 

Commitment from students and parents

regarding volunteer committees and

attendance through Theatre week in May.

 

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator.

 

Bible 7

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements Bible & is a walk through the Old Testament - "Big Picture" style. We will talk about well-known…
Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Bible & is a walk through the Old Testament - "Big Picture" style. We will talk about well-known Biblical characters but the focus of this course is not to just read bible stories over again, but rather to start putting it all together as one BIG STORY.

We will look at the Old Testament as God's story of His quest to get back onto right relationship with His creation. We will see how the history of the Children of Israel leads us right to Jesus

Individual weekly assignments - 60% of the course mark

3 comprehensive quizzes - 20% of the course mark

TimeLine Project – 20% of the course mark

Bonus marks for Scripture memorization

Each week there will be some reading to do in your own Bibles, you will listen to an audio clip, sometimes you will watch a movie or a portion of one, listen to music, build a pyramid out of sugar cubes or just write a short reflection on one of the weekly lessons.

throughout the course you will be doin one major project which will be to build a 'Timeline Notebook". When the course is complete, you will have a record of how the story of God and His people unfolded. 

 Students are also encouraged to participate regularly in a faith community, have their own personal devotional time, pray and memorize Scripture.

English 7

In English 7, there are four major units of study: Novel Study, Media and Stereotypes, Poetry, Memoirs. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for…

In English 7, there are four major units of study: Novel Study, Media and Stereotypes, Poetry, Memoirs. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, reading, forum posts and writing.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Introduction

Language and text can be a
source of creativity and joy. 
Thinking about thinking
exercises and forum post about
who we are

Unit 2: My Name is Seepeetza
- novel study

How do our confrontations with
justice and injustice help shape
our identity?

How do these confrontations
influence the things we say and do?

Exploring stories and other texts
helps us understand ourselves and
make connections to others in the world.

UNIT 3 – Media and Stereotypes

Media influences our perspective
and may create stereotypes.

Exploring and sharing multiple
perspectives extends our thinking.

Questioning what we hear, read,
and view contributes to our ability
to be educated and engaged citizens

UNIT 4 – Poetry

Who and what influence our self-
identity?

Exploring stories and texts helps
us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the
world.

UNIT 5 – Memoirs

 

You can explore your memories,
thoughts, and feelings to discover
who you are.

Exploring stories and other texts
helps us understand ourselves and
make connections to others and to the world.


Formative activities to interact
with novel

Forums to share

Planning steps & feedback then
summative assessment of book
review

Reflective formative quick write
activities

Steps to produce PSA with
feedback

Summative presentation & peer
responses to PSA

Participation in Forum discussions

Steps with feedback in the process
of writing a summative piece of
poetry

 

Read and reflect then respond activities

Scaffolded steps to writing a
personal memoir with feedback throughout then summative
assessment criteria


Novels:

“My Name is Seepeetza” by Shirley Stirling

 

“Petey” by Ben Mikaelsen

 

English 7

In English 7, there are four major units of study: Novel Study, Media and Stereotypes, Poetry, Memoirs. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for…

In English 7, there are four major units of study: Novel Study, Media and Stereotypes, Poetry, Memoirs. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, reading, forum posts and writing.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Introduction

Language and text can be a
source of creativity and joy. 
Thinking about thinking
exercises and forum post about
who we are

Unit 2: My Name is Seepeetza
- novel study

How do our confrontations with
justice and injustice help shape
our identity?

How do these confrontations
influence the things we say and do?

Exploring stories and other texts
helps us understand ourselves and
make connections to others in the world.

UNIT 3 – Media and Stereotypes

Media influences our perspective
and may create stereotypes.

Exploring and sharing multiple
perspectives extends our thinking.

Questioning what we hear, read,
and view contributes to our ability
to be educated and engaged citizens

UNIT 4 – Poetry

Who and what influence our self-
identity?

Exploring stories and texts helps
us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the
world.

UNIT 5 – Memoirs

 

You can explore your memories,
thoughts, and feelings to discover
who you are.

Exploring stories and other texts
helps us understand ourselves and
make connections to others and to the world.


Formative activities to interact
with novel

Forums to share

Planning steps & feedback then
summative assessment of book
review

Reflective formative quick write
activities

Steps to produce PSA with
feedback

Summative presentation & peer
responses to PSA

Participation in Forum discussions

Steps with feedback in the process
of writing a summative piece of
poetry

 

Read and reflect then respond activities

Scaffolded steps to writing a
personal memoir with feedback throughout then summative
assessment criteria


Novels:

“My Name is Seepeetza” by Shirley Stirling

 

“Petey” by Ben Mikaelsen

 

Math 7

In Math 7 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can…

In Math 7 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Multiplication & Division

  • Operations with Integers

  • Decimals

  • Decimals & Fractions

  • Linear Relations & Equations

  • Cartesian Plane

  • 2D Geometry

  • Circles, Cylinders, & Prisms

  • Probability

  • Percent & Financial Literacy

Students will participate in numerous
engaging hands on projects throughout
the course, applying the concepts
covered as well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and
projects.

Project work will include
self-reflection and self-
evaluation.

 There will be a final exam
at the end of the course.

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

Printer/Scanner:
Access to a printer is
highly suggested for
printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.


*Math7 - Synchronous:
Students commit to
keeping pace with the class
and to attending the weekly
meeting which will last
approximately 15 minutes.
Students must download
Zoom in order to participate
in weekly meetings.

 

Math 7

In Math 7 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can…

In Math 7 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

This is the traditional online model of “any time, any pace, any place”.  The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Skype to help with questions, editing writing.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Multiplication & Division

  • Operations with Integers

  • Decimals

  • Decimals & Fractions

  • Linear Relations & Equations

  • Cartesian Plane

  • 2D Geometry

  • Circles, Cylinders, & Prisms

  • Probability

  • Percent & Financial Literacy

Students will participate in numerous
engaging hands on projects throughout
the course, applying the concepts
covered as well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and
projects.

Project work will include
self-reflection and self-
evaluation.

 There will be a final exam
at the end of the course.

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

Printer/Scanner:
Access to a printer is
highly suggested for
printing of lesson notes,
assignments and projects.
Work will also need to be
scanned and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.

 

 

Physical and Health Education 7

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. The Grade 6-9 main goals are for students to learn how healthy choices influence our physical, emotional and mental…

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. The Grade 6-9 main goals are for students to learn how healthy choices influence our physical, emotional and mental well-being and gain understanding of how physical literacy and fitness contribute to our successes and enjoyment in physical activity. The Physical and Health Education (PHE) curriculum aims to empower students to develop a personalized understanding of what healthy living means to them as individuals and members of society in the 21st century. The PHE curriculum focuses on well-being — the connections between physical, intellectual, mental, and social health.PHE is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings that students need for lifelong physical health and mental well-being.Students can apply the knowledge, processes, and skills learned to their daily lives while engaging in an exploration of what healthy living means and looks like for them. With the uniqueness of each student in mind, the curriculum facilitates a deep understanding of both physical and health literacy to provide students with the theoretical and practical foundations to embrace their interests and passions and have a healthy active lifestyle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  •  

    Daily physical activity enables us to practice skillful movement and helps us develop personal fitness.

  • Physical literacy and fitness contribute to our success in and enjoyment of physical activity.

  • We experience many changes in our lives that influence how we see ourselves and others.

  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

  • Learning about similarities and differences in individuals and groups influences community health.


This is an individualized course and a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created with consideration of the resources being utilized and based on communication strategies with each family.


Resource materials for this course will be determined in conjunction with the parent, teacher, and student (when possible). 

Abbotsford CC - Grade 7

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 7, Social Studies 7, and Physical and Health Education 7. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied…

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 7, Social Studies 7, and Physical and Health Education 7. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Social Studies: Conflict Caused by Economic Self-interest, Global Issues, Systems of Government, Impact of Media

 

Science: Human Body, Everyday Mixtures, Newton’s Three Laws and Balancing Forces, Solar System

 

PHE: Active Living, Building Physical Literacy and Fitness, Impact of Change, How healthy Choices influence Well-Being, Inclusion and Empathy in Communities

Developing skills in kicking, hitting, aim and scoring, passing, dribbling. Play is the Way games and soccer, basketball, volleyball, badminton, baseball, dodgeball, California kickball, and hockey. Exercise through the week at home and family discussions of health topics. The FITT and SAID principles. Healthy food and body image. Social, mental and community health discussions.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

 

 

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 7 core and course competencies through varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through May.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all assignments 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Kelowna CC - Grade 7

This class will cover Science 7, Social Studies 7 and PHE 7. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different…

This class will cover Science 7, Social Studies 7 and PHE 7. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements. This class meets weekly on Wednesdays. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Social Studies: Conflict Caused by Economic Self-interest, Global Issues, Systems of Government, Impact of Media

 

 

Science: Human Body, Everyday Mixtures, Newton’s Three Laws and Balancing Forces, Solar System

 

PHE:Active Living, Building Physical Literacy and Fitness, Impact of Change, How healthy Choices influence Well-Being, Inclusion and Empathy in Communities

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the grade 7 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Langley CC - Grade 7

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 7, Social Studies 7, and Applied Design, Skills and Technology 7. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate…

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 7, Social Studies 7, and Applied Design, Skills and Technology 7. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements.  For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

 

Science: Newton’s Laws of Motion. Astronomy/Our Solar System. Mixtures in Chemistry. Systems of Multicellular organisms and interaction with the environment.

 

Social Studies: Systems of government. Urbanization and migration. Regional and International conflict.  Economic policies and resource management, including effects on indigenous peoples. Effects of Media. 

 

Choice of one ADST below

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (A): Woodworking. Sewing and Crocheting. Moodle course ADST: Introduction to ADST and the Design Process

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (B):

Coding and Computer Programming. Robotics using Dash. Computers and Communications Devices with 3D printing.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 7 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Science 7

In Science 7 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 7 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, lab experiences, projects interactive applets and more.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Physics: students will explore
how electricity is generated using

electromagnetic force, investigate
the advantages and disadvantages
in using a variety of

resources to generate electricity,
and then apply their understanding
in a final project.

 

Chemistry: students explore types
of matter, atoms, types of atoms, the
Periodic Table of Elements,
compounds, types of elements and
their properties. Students investigate
crystals, acids and bases, oxidation
and more.

 

 

Biology: students will take an imaginary journey with Charles Darwin to learn
about the Scientific Process and what led
to the development of The Theory of Evolution. Students learn about
observations, inferences, lab procedure, prediction, comparative and evaluative
skills and more. Students will learn about
the difference between facts and theories
and how each are developed.

 

Earth Science: students explore how
climate change affects all different areas, and even areas that are not contributors

to the changes. Climate injustice is a big topic as we are only scratching the surface of what some of the issues are.

 


Quizzes to check factual understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

 

As well, there are a variety of
hands on activities from
projects to labs which help
students gain a more concrete
and practical understanding of
the content.

 

Activities include creating: lab reports, informational posters, compare/contrast diagrams,
hands-on and virtual lab investigations, case studies, journals and reflections, as well as self-assessment using rubrics. 


Students need regular access to an internet connected computer and the ability to print and upload assignments.

 

Most supplies for labs and projects can be found around the house.

 

 

Time commitment for this course is approximately 3 hours per week.

 

Science 7

In Science 7 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 7 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, lab experiences, projects interactive applets and more.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Physics: students will explore
how electricity is generated using

electromagnetic force, investigate
the advantages and disadvantages
in using a variety of

resources to generate electricity,
and then apply their understanding
in a final project.

 

Chemistry: students explore types
of matter, atoms, types of atoms, the
Periodic Table of Elements,
compounds, types of elements and
their properties. Students investigate
crystals, acids and bases, oxidation
and more.

 

 

Biology: students will take an imaginary journey with Charles Darwin to learn
about the Scientific Process and what led
to the development of The Theory of Evolution. Students learn about
observations, inferences, lab procedure, prediction, comparative and evaluative
skills and more. Students will learn about
the difference between facts and theories
and how each are developed.

 

Earth Science: students explore how
climate change affects all different areas, and even areas that are not contributors

to the changes. Climate injustice is a big topic as we are only scratching the surface of what some of the issues are.

 


Quizzes to check factual understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

 

As well, there are a variety of
hands on activities from
projects to labs which help
students gain a more concrete
and practical understanding of
the content.

 

Activities include creating: lab reports, informational posters, compare/contrast diagrams,
hands-on and virtual lab investigations, case studies, journals and reflections, as well as self-assessment using rubrics. 


Students need regular access to an internet connected computer and the ability to print and upload assignments.

 

Most supplies for labs and projects can be found around the house.

 

 

Time commitment for this course is approximately 3 hours per week.

 

French 7

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 5: Travel: Destinations,
Directions and Locations, Time,
Arrivals, Departures

Unit 6: Past and Future:

Correspondence, Meaning and
Understanding, Careers, Formal
and Informal Situations


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


2 years of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

French 7

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches a…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 5: Travel: Destinations,
Directions and Locations, Time,
Arrivals, Departures

Unit 6: Past and Future:

Correspondence, Meaning and
Understanding, Careers, Formal
and Informal Situations


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


2 years of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

German 7

Designed for the beginner German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level B (prerequisite: German Level B). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta…

Designed for the beginner German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level B (prerequisite: German Level B). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 2

(Units 5 and 6)

  • 1 activation project (2 parts)

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings
    with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • Rosetta Stone Level 2
    (Units 1 and 2) 

  • 20 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with
Internet required

 

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

 

USB Headset with microphone

 

Mandarin 7

Mandarin 7 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 5 and 6, level 2) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story readings and live…

Mandarin 7 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 5 and 6, level 2) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story readings and live tutorials as well as cultural and FFPOL projects. Students are immersed in the world of Mandarin Chinese language and have the choice of completing the course in Pin Yin, simplified and traditional Chinese. Projects include the activation project which reflect cultural comparisons, First Peoples perspectives, social and cultural activities and an interview with a native Mandarin speaker.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Unit 5 Travel: 

Activation project, types of buildings, types of stores, asking for directions, following directions, public transportation, directional language, vehicles, verbs used with modes of transportation, various kinds of travel itineraries. specific time words, additional modes of transportation, numbers 70-99, useful vocabulary for airport travel destinations, weather language, temperature, kinds of precipitation, talking about the weather in the future

Creative Works Project

Unit 6 Past and Future:

Past tense, indirect objects, correspondence, future tense, indirect objects, asking for clarification, school subjects, imperfect tense, different levels of school and students, jobs and workplaces, contrast between past tense and imperfect tense, polite ways to make requests

Interview Project

 

 

 

Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their pronunciation, matching pictures to the correct phrases, writing, comprehension, games activities and listening skills. Criterion and the rubric for the activation and creative works project are found in the Moodle course.

 

Unit 5: Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the activation project and creative works project. Students will also have their first teacher meeting discuss any questions as they start the course. 

 

Unit 6:  Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the interview project where students interview a native Mandarin Chinese speaker. Students will also have 2 general meetings with the teacher to  review their progress in Moodle to ensure that all components outlined in the course are completed and they have submitted completion. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish 7

Rosetta Stone Foundations courses are comprised of five components: Language Lessons - Teaches by pairing words to images using rich visual imagery and interactive software to…

Rosetta Stone Foundations courses are comprised of five components:

  • Language Lessons - Teaches by pairing words to images using rich visual imagery and interactive software to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation

  • Games & Activities - Allows learners to play games online, connect with language learners around the world and practice the new language learned in their lessons with other learners at a similar level

  • Live Tutoring Sessions - Allows learners to practice and refine conversational skills with native-speaking tutors building on and reinforcing what has been learned in Rosetta Lessons.

  • Projects. In addition to the Rosetta Stone requirements, additional culture specific projects are also required.

  • Live meetings with the course teacher. Face to Face sessions with the teacher to practice and discuss what the student had learned in their lessons.

Students are expected to complete three 30 minute sessions per week, alternating time spent between Language Lessons (20 minutes) and Games & Activities (10 minutes) each session. Student will attend Live Tutoring sessions every four weeks. In addition to the Rosetta Stone content, students will be required to submit 3 term projects to their teacher.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Lesson 1: Destinations:

● Types of buildings

 ● Types of stores

 ● Asking for directions

 ● Following directions

Lesson 2: Directions and Location

Public transportation

 ● Directional language

 ● Vehicles

 ● Verbs used with modes of transportation

 ● Various kinds of transportation stations

Lesson 3: Time, Arrivals and Departures

Travel itineraries

 ● Specific time words

 ● Additional modes of transportation 

● Numbers 70-99

 ● Useful vocabulary for airports and train stations

Lesson 4: Weather Today and Tomorrow

Travel destinations

 ● Weather language 

● Temperature 

● Kinds of precipitation

 ● Talking about the weather in the future  

Lesson 5: Milestone

Each unit concludes with a Milestone, an interactive capstone activity that lets the learner practice key skills learned and apply new language knowledge in Communication, Acquire, interpret, and present information real-life situations.

 

 

 


Student Progress:
Complexion of Language Lessons: Core lessons, pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar.

Games:
Time spent in activity games to reinforce language acquisition.

Term Projects

Cultural Projects

 

Live Tutoring sessions



 
Level 1

Spanish 7

Rosetta Stone Foundations courses are comprised of five components: Language Lessons - Teaches by pairing words to images using rich visual imagery and interactive software to…

Rosetta Stone Foundations courses are comprised of five components:

  • Language Lessons - Teaches by pairing words to images using rich visual imagery and interactive software to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation

  • Games & Activities - Allows learners to play games online, connect with language learners around the world and practice the new language learned in their lessons with other learners at a similar level

  • Live Tutoring Sessions - Allows learners to practice and refine conversational skills with native-speaking tutors building on and reinforcing what has been learned in Rosetta Lessons.

  • Projects. In addition to the Rosetta Stone requirements, additional culture specific projects are also required.

  • Live meetings with the course teacher. Face to Face sessions with the teacher to practice and discuss what the student had learned in their lessons.

Students are expected to complete three 30 minute sessions per week, alternating time spent between Language Lessons (20 minutes) and Games & Activities (10 minutes) each session. Student will attend Live Tutoring sessions every four weeks. In addition to the Rosetta Stone content, students will be required to submit 3 term projects to their teacher.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Lesson 1: Destinations:

● Types of buildings

 ● Types of stores

 ● Asking for directions

 ● Following directions

Lesson 2: Directions and Location

Public transportation

 ● Directional language

 ● Vehicles

 ● Verbs used with modes of transportation

 ● Various kinds of transportation stations

Lesson 3: Time, Arrivals and Departures

Travel itineraries

 ● Specific time words

 ● Additional modes of transportation 

● Numbers 70-99

 ● Useful vocabulary for airports and train stations

Lesson 4: Weather Today and Tomorrow

Travel destinations

 ● Weather language 

● Temperature 

● Kinds of precipitation

 ● Talking about the weather in the future  

Lesson 5: Milestone

Each unit concludes with a Milestone, an interactive capstone activity that lets the learner practice key skills learned and apply new language knowledge in Communication, Acquire, interpret, and present information real-life situations.

 

 

 


Student Progress:
Complexion of Language Lessons: Core lessons, pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar.

Games:
Time spent in activity games to reinforce language acquisition.

Term Projects

Cultural Projects

 

Live Tutoring sessions



 
Level 1

Social Studies 7

A study of 4 Ancient civilizations: Egyptian, Chinese, Roman and Greek using a variety of academic websites for student investigation as “Culture Investigation Agents” recruits. …

A study of 4 Ancient civilizations: Egyptian, Chinese, Roman and Greek using a variety of academic websites for student investigation as “Culture Investigation Agents” recruits.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Ancient Egypt

Unit 2: Ancient China

Unit 3: Ancient Greece

Unit 4: Ancient Rome

Each unit involves students
investigating and reflecting
upon the cultures, geography,
and history of the people.  Each
unit culminates in students
choosing a presentation topic
and sharing their learning in
projects in a shared forum.

Weekly formative assessment
on research skills, writing and
reflection in student work.  A
summative assessment is given
for the projects presented at the
end of each unit.

Reliable internet function. 
 

Skype or Zoom for interaction
with the teacher.

Social Studies 7

A study of 4 Ancient civilizations: Egyptian, Chinese, Roman and Greek using a variety of academic websites for student investigation as “Culture Investigation Agents” recruits. …

A study of 4 Ancient civilizations: Egyptian, Chinese, Roman and Greek using a variety of academic websites for student investigation as “Culture Investigation Agents” recruits.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 1: Ancient Egypt

Unit 2: Ancient China

Unit 3: Ancient Greece

Unit 4: Ancient Rome

Each unit involves students
investigating and reflecting
upon the cultures, geography,
and history of the people.  Each
unit culminates in students
choosing a presentation topic
and sharing their learning in
projects in a shared forum.

Weekly formative assessment
on research skills, writing and
reflection in student work.  A
summative assessment is given
for the projects presented at the
end of each unit.

Reliable internet function. 
 

Skype or Zoom for interaction
with the teacher.

ADST 8 Lua Programming Through Minecraft

This Minecraft Applied Design Skills and Technology 8/9 module will introduce students to programming and the design process in a 3D digital environment. Following a pre-set…

This Minecraft Applied Design Skills and Technology 8/9 module will introduce students to programming and the design process in a 3D digital environment. Following a pre-set process, students will plan, test, improve and share 3D products (maze, program and virtual diorama) using Minecraft.

Students will be asked to show proper online etiquette and discuss issues related to sharing information and products online. Students will learn to program with visual and text editors. They will interact with digital technology and show competence with the tools as they are guided to explore and create using the diversely utilized and powerful resource known as Minecraft.

 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tutorial World -  In this lesson, you traverse a Tutorial World with six zones. The first five zones teach basic skills used in Minecraft, and the sixth zone opens you to the world of Minecraft to practice your new skills..

Custom Skins - This lesson will take you through the steps needed to research, plan and create your own custom skin to ensure you are projecting the image and message you are intending to those who see your avatar.

Turtle Canyon - The following lesson will help you understand how to use programs to complete tasks within Minecraft. You will have to navigate the world, command turtles and program turtles to explore and solve puzzles. In this lesson, you travel through four zones. These zones teach basic skills needed to program turtles in Minecraft.

Binary - This lesson is intended to introduce some computer history and explain what binary is while teaching you how to count in binary. 

aMAZEing Turtles - This lesson plan is meant to introduce you to programing turtles using the lua language. This lesson will help you understand how to use lua to complete programming tasks within Minecraft. 

Workplace Safety and Technology - The technologies we create and use can dramatically affect our working methods, and even affect our bodies and physical environments. The creation and use of a product can create pollution, waste and damage or improve land, resource collection, processing and quality of life. When a product or technology is created there can be positive and negative consequences that the user should consider.


 

Rubrics with expectations are used for each assignment.

Time Commitment:
This course is based on 2 sessions of approximately 45 minutes every week (some students may work more or less intensively on projects) for 12 weeks.

Requirements:
Students are required to read course content, stream videos contained within the course content, download and print assignments, scan or photograph assignments, screen capture and upload their assignments within Moodle.

 

 

 

ADST 8-9: Arduino

Course Overview: This ADST Modules will introduce students to concepts of robotics including sensors, microprocessors, actuators, circuits, resistors, Ohm’s law, and line coding.…

Course Overview: This ADST Modules will introduce students to concepts of robotics including sensors, microprocessors, actuators, circuits, resistors, Ohm’s law, and line coding. Students will complete several of the projects found in the official Arduino Starter Kit. Students will build projects by following instructions. They will modify the project and then share a video of their work using FlipGrid. The module will conclude with a design project in which students will create their own electronic device to improve life at home.

Time Commitment: There are 18 lessons in this module. Most lessons are 1 to 2 hours long, including the time to build and troubleshoot the circuits and complete the lesson quizzes. Some lessons are shorter (less than 30 minutes) while the design project could take several days and many hours to complete. 

This module can be taken at any point in grades 8-9 which is why you will see it offered at each grade level, but please note it is the same module offered at each grade so it can only be taken once.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Arduino Safety

Ohm’s Law and Resistors

Using the Arduino Forum

Building 6 Projects from the Arduino Projects Book

The Design Process

Final Design Project

 

 

Arduino projects will be presented through video using Flipgrid 

Frequent short quizzes 

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student

Self-Assessment of the Design Process steps



 

Students will need to purchase the official Arduino Starter Kit which costs approximately $130 and includes all the necessary parts and the course textbook

Computer with webcam and microphone

 

 

ADST 8-9: Lego Robotics 2

This ADST Module will build upon the concepts covered in Lego Robotics 1. Students will test the limits of the various sensors and motors, learn about gears, experiment with…

This ADST Module will build upon the concepts covered in Lego Robotics 1. Students will test the limits of the various sensors and motors, learn about gears, experiment with various coding action blocks, and will complete several design challenges as they lead up to their final project: designing a self-driving vehicle using the Design Process. 

This module can be taken at any point in grades 8- 9 which is why you will see it offered at each grade level, but please note it is the same module offered at each grade so it can only be taken once.

Time Commitment: There are 18 lessons in this module. Most lessons are less than one hour long, including time to build with Lego. Some lessons are shorter (less than 30 minutes) while a few will require a student to build a larger robot, which could take several hours. 

Important:  Students will be able to borrow the Lego Mindstorm Kit from the Learning Commons for 8 weeks only. Because of this, students will need to complete this module in 8 weeks.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

What is a Robot?

Building Lego from Plans

Using Motors and Sensors

Introduction to Lego Programming

The Design Process

Final Design Project

 

 

 

Written assignment on Sensors and Actuators

Video submissions of Lego builds and challenges

Research on the making of products

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student


A computer with a webcam and microphone and highspeed internet connection.  

Students will need to install the Lego programming software. This course works best on PCs. Please contact the course teacher if you do not have access to a PC and would like to take this course. 

Students will be able to reserve one of our Lego Kits for 8 weeks during the year for no extra cost. There is a limited number of kits available. Please contact the course teacher to inquire about availability.    

 

 

 

ADST 8: Leveled Coding in Tynker

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools. Students will start with an introduction to…

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools.

Students will start with an introduction to Tynker, learning how to use Tynker's tools to create their own coding projects. Following this introduction students will complete one of Tynker's leveled courses, checking in with the course teacher, whom they can access for help and support along the way. The module will conclude when students complete a design challenge in Tynker's "Blank Project" workspace.

At the beginning of the module, students will meet with the module teacher to decide which Tynker course to complete. This will ensure that students are working at the right difficulty level, based on their previous experience and learning.

Students can take Leveled Coding in Tynker multiple times between grades 5 and 9. In this way, students will be able to complete several of Tynker's courses between grades 6 and 9 and can progress from block coding to line coding.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tynker Programming Lessons

Design Project

 

 

Tynker lessons will be marked for completion.

Tynker quiz scores will be referenced to check for conceptual understanding.

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student.  





 

A computer with an internet connection.  

Students will be set up with a Tynker account.  There is no extra cost for this.

 

 

Abbotsford Ignite Theatre CC - Theatre 8

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice…

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice and are committed to a high standard of excellence as they develop skills in acting, singing, and choreography to produce high-caliber musicals. Our educational community of committed students, talented instructors and amazing parents feel like family and together will put on six professional performances of ‘The Newsies’ in May 2021 with impressive costumes and set design. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

  • Auditions: solo song, choreography, scene work
  • Watch video clips of Disney’s Newsies to improve performance

  • Theatre Games and dramatic exercises

  • Vocal Warm-Up and Training: increase vocal range, develop pitch, lyrics, tempo, harmonies 

  • Choreography: dance movements and sequential patterns in rhythm to music with partners. Tap dance and fight scene 

  • Acting: blocking, understand the intent and purpose, mood, events, emotion and convey with appropriate body movements.

  • Character Sketch

  • Develop high and lower class New York accent  

  • Set and strive to achieve weekly goals in vocal work, choreography, scene work 

  • Stop N’ Starts addressing areas to improve.

  • Write bio for program

  • Perform in a variety of settings

  • Tour and orientation of theatre, coordinate Sets, Flys, lighting, aerials choreography, music, props and costumes to smooth out transitions. 

  • Discussion on the injustices of how the Newsies were treated.

 

Formative and summative assessment

of the Grade 8 core and course

competencies incorporating audition

evaluation form, oral presentation,

songs, choreography, performance rubric,

self-assessment, observations of growth and

working from feedback, homework assignments,

and others.


Attendance at weekly classes

September through May.

 

Completed Online Application link

and acceptance required; see the

Learning Groups website for further details.

These courses are added internally.

 

 

 

Completion of all assignments 

 

 

 

Commitment from students and parents

regarding volunteer committees and

attendance through Theatre week in May.

 

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator.

 

Bible 8

This course will reveal the nature, character and attributes of God in light of Scripture to give teens a better grasp of who God is. It is based on the premise that the more we…

This course will reveal the nature, character and attributes of God in light of Scripture to give teens a better grasp of who God is. It is based on the premise that the more we know and understand God through a careful study of His Word, the greater will be our personal challenge to maintain a right relationship with Him.

Time Commitment:

Based on a semester pacing, this course is based on five, 45 to 60 minute lesson parts every week.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Knowing God,

Attributes of God,

Character and Existence
of God,

Creation,

World Religions

Students will be assessed
(via a series of assignment
work, projects, etc.) on their
understanding of who God is,
His attributes, and
characteristics, and humanity’s
place in light of this.

“Let God Be God”
and the Bible

English 8

English 8 is about tribes and stories. Our tribe is a group of people that we identify with - a group that we are part of, whether it is our family, our community, our religious…

English 8 is about tribes and stories.

Our tribe is a group of people that we identify with - a group that we are part of, whether it is our family, our community, our religious community, our ethnic background, or our nationality. A tribe can be fans of the same hockey team or the same music band. A tribe can be a church. If you have stories in common with a group of people, you’re part of a tribe. In the first part of English 8, students will be figuring out who their tribe is, and learning to tell the stories of their people.

The second part of the course talks about the shadow side of being part of tribes. What happens when we start to think that our tribe is superior to other tribes? What if we start to hate people from other groups because we are blinded by loyalty to our own? How do we obey the great commandment to love our neighbour as ourselves, and how can hearing other people’s stories help us to have compassion for others? For this part of the course, students will be studying two novels, The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, and Wonder by R.J. Palacio.

In the final part of the course, students will have a chance to tell their family’s story through a documentary, slideshow, or magazine. Hopefully this will help them to have a sense of healthy pride in their own family’s story, and will help them connect with their families in a new way. 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Time Commitment:  

This course consists of 28 lessons. Each lesson is designed to take approximately one week, with most weeks comprised of three 40 minute sessions. Students who wish to complete the course in a single semester can complete the lessons at their own pace.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Unit 1: Learning to Tell Your Story

  • Creative writing

  • Research

  • Interviewing

  • Family history

  • Identity 

  • Oral stories

 

Unit 2: The Outsiders Novel Study

 

  • Thinking Routines

  • Character analysis

  • Morality

  • Paragraph Writing

 

Unit 3: Us vs. Them

 

  • Homelessness

  • Research and source integration

  • Essay writing 

 

Unit 4:  Wonder Novel Study

 

  • Thinking Routines

  • Character analysis

  • Perspectives

 

Unit 5: Family Documentary

 

  • Presentations

  • Using various media

  • Research

  • Telling your story


Various written assignments
are submitted and marked
with feedback each week. 
These include thinking
routines, paragraphs, reports,
short answers, forum posts,
creative writing assignments,
essays, and more.

Rubrics are used throughout
the course.

Written feedback is also
provided.

Various written assignments
are submitted and marked
with feedback each week. 
These include thinking routines, paragraphs, reports, short
answers, forum posts, creative
writing assignments, essays,
and more.

 

Rubrics are used throughout
the course.

 

Written feedback is also
provided.


Students are required to
stream videos contained
within the course content,
download and print
assignments and note
packages, scan (either by
taking pictures or physically
scanning) and upload their assignments within Moodle.

Students may borrow or
purchase the following novels:

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

 

Wonder by R.J. Palacio

 

Synchronous students will need a webcam and microphone.

 

English 8

English 8 is about tribes and stories. Our tribe is a group of people that we identify with - a group that we are part of, whether it is our family, our community, our religious…

English 8 is about tribes and stories.

Our tribe is a group of people that we identify with - a group that we are part of, whether it is our family, our community, our religious community, our ethnic background, or our nationality. A tribe can be fans of the same hockey team or the same music band. A tribe can be a church. If you have stories in common with a group of people, you’re part of a tribe. In the first part of English 8, students will be figuring out who their tribe is, and learning to tell the stories of their people.

The second part of the course talks about the shadow side of being part of tribes. What happens when we start to think that our tribe is superior to other tribes? What if we start to hate people from other groups because we are blinded by loyalty to our own? How do we obey the great commandment to love our neighbour as ourselves, and how can hearing other people’s stories help us to have compassion for others? For this part of the course, students will be studying two novels, The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, and Wonder by R.J. Palacio.

In the final part of the course, students will have a chance to tell their family’s story through a documentary, slideshow, or magazine. Hopefully this will help them to have a sense of healthy pride in their own family’s story, and will help them connect with their families in a new way. 

This is the traditional Online model of “any time, any pace, any place.”  The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Zoom to help with questions and writing development.

Time Commitment:  

This course consists of 28 lessons. Each lesson is designed to take approximately one week, with most weeks comprised of three 40 minute sessions. Students who wish to complete the course in a single semester can complete the lessons at their own pace.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Unit 1: Learning to Tell Your Story

  • Creative writing

  • Research

  • Interviewing

  • Family history

  • Identity 

  • Oral stories

 

Unit 2: The Outsiders Novel Study

 

  • Thinking Routines

  • Character analysis

  • Morality

  • Paragraph Writing

 

Unit 3: Us vs. Them

 

  • Homelessness

  • Research and source integration

  • Essay writing 

 

Unit 4:  Wonder Novel Study

 

  • Thinking Routines

  • Character analysis

  • Perspectives

 

Unit 5: Family Documentary

 

  • Presentations

  • Using various media

  • Research

  • Telling your story


Various written assignments
are submitted and marked
with feedback each week. 
These include thinking
routines, paragraphs, reports,
short answers, forum posts,
creative writing assignments,
essays, and more.

Rubrics are used throughout
the course.

Written feedback is also
provided.

Various written assignments
are submitted and marked
with feedback each week. 
These include thinking routines, paragraphs, reports, short
answers, forum posts, creative
writing assignments, essays,
and more.

 

Rubrics are used throughout
the course.

 

Written feedback is also
provided.


Students are required to
stream videos contained
within the course content,
download and print
assignments and note
packages, scan (either by
taking pictures or physically
scanning) and upload their assignments within Moodle.

Students may borrow or
purchase the following novels:

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

 

Wonder by R.J. Palacio

 

 

 

Literacy Foundations Math 5

Literacy Foundations Math is designed to help students who have fallen behind with their Math skills. Specifically this course is built to support students heading into Workplace…

Literacy Foundations Math is designed to help students who have fallen behind with their Math skills. Specifically this course is built to support students heading into Workplace Math 10, and Workplace Math 11. As you go through this course you will build the toolkit required to be successful in the lower streams of Math in Grade 10 and 11. This is the paper-based option where a textbook and 3 additional paper resources need to be printed off and completed.

If a student is multiple grades behind in their Math level, this is the course for them. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Unit 1: Number
Multiplying, Dividing, Adding, Subtracting, Measuring, Averaging

Unit 2: Fractions, Decimals, Percentages

Unit 3: Geometry
Lines, Degrees, Angles, Triangles, Rectangles, Prisms

Unit 4: Exponents 

Unit 5: Circles and Volume

Unit 6: Algebra and Graphing

Unit 7: Statistics and Probability

When a student completes “Bridge the Gap Math”
each lesson is split into a page on teaching, and a
page of test questions. Students must complete
the test question for required lessons in the Unit. 

Each Unit wraps up with a summative assessment
called the ‘Unit Challenge’ and contains multiple different kinds of questions: M/C, short answer, long answer, word problems. 

There are additional units that are printed off and worked through.

“Bridge the Gap Math” by Laurie Beesting

Laptop/Computer

Google Chrome web browser (not a Requirement but a STRONG suggestion)

Printer

Scanner (you can use your smart phone if you don’t have a scanner)

StudyForge (optional: it’s a $30 subscription and provides students with the entire course in video format)

Literacy Foundations Math 5

Literacy Foundations Math is designed to help students who have fallen behind with their Math skills. Specifically this course is built to support students heading into Workplace…

Literacy Foundations Math is designed to help students who have fallen behind with their Math skills. Specifically this course is built to support students heading into Workplace Math 10, and is followed up with Literacy Foundations Math Level 6. As you go through this course you will build the toolkit required to be successful in the lower streams of Math Grade 10 and 11. There are many units but they are bite-sized. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Operations with Integers

Decimals and Fractions

Multiplying and Dividing Fractions

 

Percents

 

Exponents

 

Algebra

 

Cartesian Plane 

 

Circles

Volume

 

Ratios and Proportions

 

Line Graphs

 

Probability

 

Each chapter is split into Lessons where you are required to complete 3 things:

  1. Complete the Chapter Note Package

  2. Watch all of the Lesson videos

  3. Complete at least 5 practice questions in a Lesson

Each chapter then has an assignment to gauge if the concepts have been learned. 

Each chapter wraps up with a summative assessment called the ‘Chapter Challenge’ and includes 3 things: 

  1. M/C questions

  2. Short Answer questions

  3. Word Problems

Laptop

Google Chrome web browser (not a Requirement but a STRONG suggestion)

Printer

Scanner (you can use your smartphone if you don’t have a scanner)

Math 8

In Math 8 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can…

In Math 8 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Percents

  • Squares, Cubes, & Pythagoras

  • Rate & Proportion

  • Adding & Subtracting Fractions

  • Multiplying & Dividing Fractions

  • Linear Equations

  • Geometry & Nets

  • Surface Area & Volume

  • Probability

  • Financial Literacy

Students will participate in
numerous engaging hands on
projects throughout  the course,
applying the concepts covered as
well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and
projects.

Project work will include
self-reflection and self-
evaluation.

 There will be a final exam
at the end of the course.

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner: Access
to a printer is highly
suggested for printing of
lesson notes, assignments
and projects. Work will
also need to be scanned
and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.

 

 

*Math 8 - Synchronous:
Students commit to keeping
pace with the class and to
attending the weekly meeting
which will last up to 30 minutes. Students must
use Zoom in order to
participate in weekly meetings.

 

Math 8

In Math 8 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can…

In Math 8 there are ten units of study. Each unit will include engaging lesson videos, practice activities, assignments, and some units will include a project where students can apply the skills learned in a real life scenario. 

This is the traditional online model of “any time, any pace, any place”.  The student works on the course independently. The teacher is available on Skype to help with questions, editing writing.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Students will explore the
following topics:

  • Percents

  • Squares, Cubes, & Pythagoras

  • Rate & Proportion

  • Adding & Subtracting Fractions

  • Multiplying & Dividing Fractions

  • Linear Equations

  • Geometry & Nets

  • Surface Area & Volume

  • Probability

  • Financial Literacy

Students will participate in
numerous engaging hands on
projects throughout  the course,
applying the concepts covered as
well as developing skills in
personal inquiry and reflection.


The course is assessed using
the Mastery Math Method,
where students work to
demonstrate mastery before
moving to a new topic.

Assessment will include:
lessons, notes, practice,
assignments, tests, and
projects.

Project work will include
self-reflection and self-
evaluation.

 There will be a final exam
at the end of the course.

Computer:
Laptop or Desktop

 

Printer/Scanner: Access
to a printer is highly
suggested for printing of
lesson notes, assignments
and projects. Work will
also need to be scanned
and submitted.

 

 

Students will need to have
an email address and skype
account for communicating
with the teacher.

 

 

 

 

Physical and Health Education 8

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. The Grade 6-9 main goals are for students to learn how healthy choices influence our physical, emotional and mental…

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. The Grade 6-9 main goals are for students to learn how healthy choices influence our physical, emotional and mental well-being and gain understanding of how physical literacy and fitness contribute to our successes and enjoyment in physical activity. The Physical and Health Education (PHE) curriculum aims to empower students to develop a personalized understanding of what healthy living means to them as individuals and members of society in the 21st century. The PHE curriculum focuses on well-being — the connections between physical, intellectual, mental, and social health.PHE is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings that students need for lifelong physical health and mental well-being.Students can apply the knowledge, processes, and skills learned to their daily lives while engaging in an exploration of what healthy living means and looks like for them. With the uniqueness of each student in mind, the curriculum facilitates a deep understanding of both physical and health literacy to provide students with the theoretical and practical foundations to embrace their interests and passions and have a healthy active lifestyle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  •  

    Daily physical activity enables us to practice skillful movement and helps us develop personal fitness.

  • Physical literacy and fitness contribute to our success in and enjoyment of physical activity.

  • We experience many changes in our lives that influence how we see ourselves and others.

  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

  • Learning about similarities and differences in individuals and groups influences community health.


This is an individualized course and a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created with consideration of the resources being utilized and based on communication strategies with each family.


Resource materials for this course will be determined in conjunction with the parent, teacher, and student (when possible). 

Abbotsford CC - Grade 8

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 8, Social Studies 8, and Physical and Health Education 8. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied…

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 8, Social Studies 8, and Physical and Health Education 8. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

Social Studies: Significant Changes Due to Conflict and Contact, Exploration, Expansion and Colonization, Tensions Created by Opposing Ideas, Inventions, Philosophical and Cultural Shifts in Society

 

Science: Life Processes at the Cellular Level, Behaviour of Matter, Energy Transfer, Plate Tectonics 

 

Physical and Health Education: Physical Literacy, Active Living Principles, Healthy Choices for Well-Being, Benefits of healthy Relationships, Advocating for Community Health

Exercise through the week at home and family discussions of health topics including nutrition, media messages and Internet safety. 

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

 

 

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 8 core and course competencies through varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through May.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all assignments 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Abbotsford CC - Grade 9

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 9, Social Studies 9, and Physical and Health Education 9. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied…

This class meets weekly on Tuesdays and will cover Science 9, Social Studies 9, and Physical and Health Education 9. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements.  For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

 

Social Studies: Significant Changes Due to Conflict and Contact, Exploration, Expansion and Colonization, Tensions Created by Opposing Ideas, Inventions, Philosophical and Cultural Shifts in Society

 

Science: Life Processes at the Cellular Level, Behaviour of Matter, Energy Transfer, Plate Tectonics 

 

Physical and Health Education: Physical Literacy, Active Living Principles, Healthy Choices for Well-Being, Benefits of healthy Relationships, Advocating for Community Health

Exercise through the week at home and family discussions of health topics including nutrition, media messages and Internet safety. 

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

 

 

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 9 core and course competencies through varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through May.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all assignments 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Kelowna CC - Grade 8

This class will cover Science 8, Social Studies 8 and Career Ed 8. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through…

This class will cover Science 8, Social Studies 8 and Career Ed 8. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements. This class meets weekly on Wednesdays. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Social Studies: Significant Changes Due to Conflict and Contact, Exploration, Expansion and Colonization, Tensions Created by Opposing Ideas, Inventions, Philosophical and Cultural Shifts in Society

 

Science: Life Processes at the Cellular Level, Behaviour of Matter, Energy Transfer, Plate Tectonics 

 

Career Ed: Knowing Self and Reaching Goals, Diverse Perspectives on Work in the Community, Goal Setting, Labour Market Changes, Career Planning

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the grade 8 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Langley CC - Grade 8

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 8, Social Studies 8, and Applied Design, Skills and Technology 8. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate…

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 8, Social Studies 8, and Applied Design, Skills and Technology 8. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements.  For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Science: Life processes of cells. Electromagnetic Energy as particle and wave. Kinetic molecular theory and theory of the atom. Geology and Theory of Plate Tectonics.

 

 

Social Studies- Human and environmental factors and effect on population. 

Exploration, colonization, urbanization, migration and conflict in the Medieval World and Renaissance.

 

Choice of one ADST below

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (A): Woodworking. Sewing and Crocheting. Moodle course ADST: Introduction to ADST and the Design Process

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (B):

Computational Thinking and Digital Literacy with computer programming. Robotics using Dash. Computers and Communications Devices with 3D printing.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 8 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Science 8

In Science 8 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 8 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, lab experiences, projects interactive applets and more.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Earth Science: explore earthquakes,
plate tectonics and the structure of
the planet.

Biology: take an in-depth look at the
smallest unit of life, the cell.  Explore
the various functions of animal cells,
plant cells and cells who are creatures
in their own right.

 

Physics: explore the properties of light
and how it behaves around mirrors,
prisms and cameras.

 

Chemistry: learn about the elements
that make up our world and how our
understanding of atoms has changed
over time.

 

Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

As well, there are a variety of
hands on activities from projects
to labs which help students gain a
more concrete and practical
understanding of the content.

Activities include creating a cell
model using a medium of your
choice, writing speeches for the Prime
Minister of Canada about earthquake
risks and building your own pinhole camera.

Students need regular access
to an internet connected
computer and the ability to
print and upload assignments.

Most supplies for labs and
projects can be found around
the house.

 

Time commitment for this
course is approximately 3 hours per week

 

Science 8

In Science 8 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students…

In Science 8 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, lab experiences, projects interactive applets and more.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Earth Science: explore earthquakes,
plate tectonics and the structure of
the planet.

Biology: take an in-depth look at the
smallest unit of life, the cell.  Explore
the various functions of animal cells,
plant cells and cells who are creatures
in their own right.

 

Physics: explore the properties of light
and how it behaves around mirrors,
prisms and cameras.

 

Chemistry: learn about the elements
that make up our world and how our
understanding of atoms has changed
over time.

 

Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

As well, there are a variety of
hands on activities from projects
to labs which help students gain a
more concrete and practical
understanding of the content.

Activities include creating a cell
model using a medium of your
choice, writing speeches for the Prime
Minister of Canada about earthquake
risks and building your own pinhole camera.

Students need regular access
to an internet connected
computer and the ability to
print and upload assignments.

Most supplies for labs and
projects can be found around
the house.

 

Time commitment for this
course is approximately 3 hours per week

 

French 8

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 7: Friends and Social Life:
Giving and Following Instructions,
Planning, Celebrations and Culture,
Invitations and Apologies

Unit 8: Dining and Vacations: Dining
In and Out, Landmarks and The Arts,
Emotions, Vacation Activities.


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


3 years of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

French 8

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches a…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 7: Friends and Social Life:
Giving and Following Instructions,
Planning, Celebrations and Culture,
Invitations and Apologies

Unit 8: Dining and Vacations: Dining
In and Out, Landmarks and The Arts,
Emotions, Vacation Activities.


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


3 years of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

German 8

Designed for the intermediate German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level C (prerequisite: German Level C). Students will do interactive lessons through the…

Designed for the intermediate German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level C (prerequisite: German Level C). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 2

(Units 7 and 8)

  • 1 activation project (2 parts)

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings
    with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • Rosetta Stone Level 2
    (Units 3 and 4) 

  • 20 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with
Internet required

 

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

 

USB Headset with microphone

 

Mandarin 8

Mandarin 8 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 7 and 8, level 2) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story reading and live…

Mandarin 8 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 7 and 8, level 2) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story reading and live tutorials as well as cultural and FFPOL projects. Students are immersed in the world of Mandarin Chinese language and have the choice of completing the course in Pin Yin, simplified and traditional Chinese. Projects include the activation project which reflect cultural comparisons, First Peoples perspectives, social and cultural activities and an interview with a native Mandarin speaker.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Unit 7 Friends and Social Life: 

Activation project, social life, leisure-time activities, activity planning, formal imperative, months of the year, planning an event, methods of communicating, how to write and say dates, informal imperative, numbers 100 through 1,000, types of parties, possession, phone etiquette, demonstrative words: “this,” “that,” “these” and “those”, adverbs of place: “here” and ”there”, party language, comparisons, accepting/declining an invitation

Creative Works Project

 

Unit 8 Dining and Vacation:

New form of the future, food and restaurant language, landmarks, architectural features, musical instruments, art media, religious buildings, emotions, sight-seeing verbs, sequencing words, common vacation activities, places to go on vacation, things to see on vacation, vacation-themed clothing, weather

Interview Project

 

 

 

Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their pronunciation, matching pictures to the correct phrases, writing, comprehension, games activities and listening skills. Criterion and the rubric for the activation and creative works project are found in the Moodle course.

 

 

Unit 7: Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the activation project and creative works project. Students will also have their first teacher meeting discuss any questions as they start the course. 

 

Unit 8:  Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the interview project where students interview a native Mandarin Chinese speaker. Students will also have 2 general meetings with the teacher to  review their progress in Moodle to ensure that all components outlined in the course are completed and they have submitted completion. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish 8

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 7 – Friends and Social Life

UNIT 8 – Dining and Vacation


 

  • Activation: learning about leisure time activities of peers living in Latin American countries

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 20 minutes for lessons followed by at least 10 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Spanish 8

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 7 – Friends and Social Life

UNIT 8 – Dining and Vacation


 

  • Activation: learning about leisure time activities of peers living in Latin American countries

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 20 minutes for lessons followed by at least 10 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Social Studies 8

This course will examine three foundational peoples and cultures from around the world in the Medieval Era, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. To get a better perspective, we will also…

This course will examine three foundational peoples and cultures from around the world in the Medieval Era, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. To get a better perspective, we will also look at the foundational beliefs and knowledge that each culture comes to the exchange with so we can better understand the emergence of the First Global Era.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

The Cultural, European,
Islamic, Asian Exchange

 

The First Global Era

Students will be assessed on
their understanding of the issues,
ideas, events, and key players of
the times and places of the
Medieval Era; using critical
thinking and strong writing skills
along the way.

Students are required to stream
videos, download and print or
complete assignments online, scan
(either by taking pictures or
physically scanning) and upload
their assignments within Moodle.

Social Studies 8

This course will examine three foundational peoples and cultures from around the world in the Medieval Era, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. To get a better perspective, we will also…

This course will examine three foundational peoples and cultures from around the world in the Medieval Era, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. To get a better perspective, we will also look at the foundational beliefs and knowledge that each culture comes to the exchange with so we can better understand the emergence of the First Global Era.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

The Cultural, European,
Islamic, Asian Exchange

 

The First Global Era

Students will be assessed on
their understanding of the issues,
ideas, events, and key players of
the times and places of the
Medieval Era; using critical
thinking and strong writing skills
along the way.

Students are required to stream
videos, download and print or
complete assignments online, scan
(either by taking pictures or
physically scanning) and upload
their assignments within Moodle.

ADST 9 Lua Programming Through Minecraft

This Minecraft Applied Design Skills and Technology 8/9 module will introduce students to programming and the design process in a 3D digital environment. Following a pre-set…

This Minecraft Applied Design Skills and Technology 8/9 module will introduce students to programming and the design process in a 3D digital environment. Following a pre-set process, students will plan, test, improve and share 3D products (maze, program and virtual diorama) using Minecraft.

Students will be asked to show proper online etiquette and discuss issues related to sharing information and products online. Students will learn to program with visual and text editors. They will interact with digital technology and show competence with the tools as they are guided to explore and create using the diversely utilized and powerful resource known as Minecraft.


Preview the Course Here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tutorial World -  In this lesson, you traverse a Tutorial World with six zones. The first five zones teach basic skills used in Minecraft, and the sixth zone opens you to the world of Minecraft to practice your new skills..

Custom Skins - This lesson will take you through the steps needed to research, plan and create your own custom skin to ensure you are projecting the image and message you are intending to those who see your avatar.

Turtle Canyon - The following lesson will help you understand how to use programs to complete tasks within Minecraft. You will have to navigate the world, command turtles and program turtles to explore and solve puzzles. In this lesson, you travel through four zones. These zones teach basic skills needed to program turtles in Minecraft.

Binary - This lesson is intended to introduce some computer history and explain what binary is while teaching you how to count in binary. 

aMAZEing Turtles - This lesson plan is meant to introduce you to programing turtles using the lua language. This lesson will help you understand how to use lua to complete programming tasks within Minecraft. 

Workplace Safety and Technology - The technologies we create and use can dramatically affect our working methods, and even affect our bodies and physical environments. The creation and use of a product can create pollution, waste and damage or improve land, resource collection, processing and quality of life. When a product or technology is created there can be positive and negative consequences that the user should consider.


 

Rubrics with expectations are used for each assignment.

Time Commitment:
This course is based on 2 sessions of approximately 45 minutes every week (some students may work more or less intensively on projects) for 12 weeks.

Requirements:
Students are required to read course content, stream videos contained within the course content, download and print assignments, scan or photograph assignments, screen capture and upload their assignments within Moodle.

 

 

 

ADST 9: Leveled Coding in Tynker

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools. Students will start with an introduction to…

Leveled Coding in Tynker is designed to introduce students to coding and the Design Process using Tynker's online courses and tools.

Students will start with an introduction to Tynker, learning how to use Tynker's tools to create their own coding projects. Following this introduction students will complete one of Tynker's leveled courses, checking in with the course teacher, whom they can access for help and support along the way. The module will conclude when students complete a design challenge in Tynker's "Blank Project" workspace.

At the beginning of the module, students will meet with the module teacher to decide which Tynker course to complete. This will ensure that students are working at the right difficulty level, based on their previous experience and learning.

Students can take Leveled Coding in Tynker multiple times between grades 5 and 9. In this way, students will be able to complete several of Tynker's courses between grades 6 and 9 and can progress from block coding to line coding.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Tynker Programming Lessons

Design Project

 

 

Tynker lessons will be marked for completion.

Tynker quiz scores will be referenced to check for conceptual understanding.

Design Project will be assessed by the teacher and student.  





 

A computer with an internet connection.  

Students will be set up with a Tynker account.  There is no extra cost for this.

 

 

Abbotsford Ignite Theatre CC - Theatre 9

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice…

The Ignite Theatre class meets weekly on Wednesdays and will cover Arts Education 5 and Careers 5. In Ignite Theatre students learn performing arts concepts through weekly practice and are committed to a high standard of excellence as they develop skills in acting, singing, and choreography to produce high-caliber musicals. Our educational community of committed students, talented instructors and amazing parents feel like family and together will put on six professional performances of ‘The Newsies’ in May 2021 with impressive costumes and set design. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

  • Auditions: solo song, choreography, scene work
  • Watch video clips of Disney’s Newsies to improve performance

  • Theatre Games and dramatic exercises

  • Vocal Warm-Up and Training: increase vocal range, develop pitch, lyrics, tempo, harmonies 

  • Choreography: dance movements and sequential patterns in rhythm to music with partners. Tap dance and fight scene 

  • Acting: blocking, understand the intent and purpose, mood, events, emotion and convey with appropriate body movements.

  • Character Sketch

  • Develop high and lower class New York accent  

  • Set and strive to achieve weekly goals in vocal work, choreography, scene work 

  • Stop N’ Starts addressing areas to improve.

  • Write bio for program

  • Perform in a variety of settings

  • Tour and orientation of theatre, coordinate Sets, Flys, lighting, aerials choreography, music, props and costumes to smooth out transitions. 

  • Discussion on the injustices of how the Newsies were treated.

 

Formative and summative assessment

of the Grade 9 core and course

competencies incorporating audition

evaluation form, oral presentation,

songs, choreography, performance rubric,

self-assessment, observations of growth and

working from feedback, homework assignments,

and others.


Attendance at weekly classes

September through May.

 

Completed Online Application link

and acceptance required; see the

Learning Groups website for further details.

These courses are added internally.

 

 

 

Completion of all assignments 

 

 

 

Commitment from students and parents

regarding volunteer committees and

attendance through Theatre week in May.

 

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator.

 

Studio Arts 9

The world is a complex and beautiful place created by God for us to enjoy. The Visual Arts offer a unique opportunity for students to develop their craft, to imitate and…

The world is a complex and beautiful place created by God for us to enjoy. The Visual Arts offer a unique opportunity for students to develop their craft, to imitate and emulate what they see created around them and through recorded history. We live in a large canvas full of colour, beauty, sound, and life.

Image development involves students engaging actively in a purposeful design process. Students will use a variety of common art materials, technologies, and processes to organize the visual elements and principles of design.

Students will be expected to maintain a sketchbook, create an advertising campaign for a band, practice one and two point perspective drawing techniques, visit and reflect on an art gallery, view works of note from art history and create a personalized version of a selected master work.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Art Diary

Elements and Principles of
Design: Art Attack!

 

Drawing One & Two Point
Perspective

 

Art Gallery Visit & Art
Appreciation

 

Lunching with the Masters...
Research Paper & Painting

 


Sketchbook/Art Diary
entries 

Major Assignments

Process images


Access to a scanner or camera
to capture images and share
work.  

 

Various Art materials such as
paper, pencils, pencil crayon
and either acrylic or watercolour
paint.

 

Bible 9

Bible 9 is centred on the idea of mastering one's Bible study skills. Some of the topics covered include the origin and inspiration of the Bible as well as how it came to us and…

Bible 9 is centred on the idea of mastering one's Bible study skills. Some of the topics covered include the origin and inspiration of the Bible as well as how it came to us and the writing of the canon. Other topics taught in this course focus on translation issues, paraphrasing versus standard translations and how to do a 3-step inductive bible study. This course will focus on the Bible, how to read it, the question of inspiration, translation, the use of induction when studying scripture, Biblical themes, literary themes, application, and devotional usage.

Time Commitment:

Based on a semester pacing, this course is based on 5, 45 to 60 minute lessons parts every week.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Inspiration of Scripture,

Canon of Scripture,

Translation,

Inductive Bible Study,

Themes,

Literary Devices,

Biblical Application

Students will be assessed
(via a series of assignment
work, projects, etc.) on their
understanding of the Bible,
how it’s comprised (scriptural
canon), the issue of inspiration,
literary devices, application of
its use, etc

“Mastering Bible Study Skills”.

Students will be working through
this book throughout the course.
All assignments are supplied within
the course and will either be
uploaded within, or posted directly
to, the course in their appropriate locations.

English 9

English 9 begins by helping the students to connect to stories from around the world, and hearing about some of the challenges that people around the world are facing today.…

English 9 begins by helping the students to connect to stories from around the world, and hearing about some of the challenges that people around the world are facing today. Students will read “Iqbal,” view documentaries about global issues, engage with poetry, media studies and choose a second novel that deals with a global issue that interests them. We are now offering a synchronous option where students meet as a group with the course teacher via video conferencing at a set time each week. This option is designed to develop community, go over each week’s lesson briefly, ask questions, etc.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Global Stories,

Exploring Global Issues,

Other Ways of Telling a

Story.

Students will be assessed on
novel studies, poetic and literary
devices, and media studies that
will help them use critical thinking
skills.

Students are required to stream
videos contained within the
course content, download
assignments, and upload their
assignments within Moodle.
Students will need to borrow or
purchase two novels.

English 9

This online, Synchronous module of English 9 begins by helping the students to connect to stories from around the world, and hearing about some of the challenges that people around…

This online, Synchronous module of English 9 begins by helping the students to connect to stories from around the world, and hearing about some of the challenges that people around the world are facing today. Students will read “Iqbal,” view documentaries about global issues, engage with poetry, media studies and choose a second novel that deals with a global issue that interests them. We are now offering a synchronous option where students meet as a group with the course teacher via video conferencing at a set time each week. This option is designed to develop community, go over each week’s lesson briefly, ask questions, etc.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Global Stories,

Exploring
Global Issues,

Other Ways
of Telling a Story.

Students will be assessed on
novel studies, poetic and
literary devices, and media
studies that will help them use
critical thinking skills.

Students are required to stream
videos contained within the course
content, download assignments,
and upload their assignments within
Moodle. Students will need to borrow
or purchase two novels.

Literacy Foundations Math 6

Literacy Foundations Math is designed to help students who have fallen behind with their Math skills. Specifically this course is built to support students heading into Workplace…

Literacy Foundations Math is designed to help students who have fallen behind with their Math skills. Specifically this course is built to support students heading into Workplace Math 10, followed by Workplace Math 11. As you go through this course you will build the toolkit required to be successful in the lower streams of Math in Grade 10 and 11. There are many units but they are bite-sized.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rational Numbers

Exponents

 

Square Roots and Pythagoras

 

Linear Relations

 

Linear Equations

 

Shapes

 

Measurement

 

Each chapter is split into Lessons where you are required to complete 3 things:

  1. Complete the Chapter Note Package

  2. Watch all of the Lesson videos

  3. Complete at least 5 practice questions in a Lesson

Each chapter then has an assignment to gauge if the concepts have been learned. 

Each chapter wraps up with a summative assessment called the ‘Chapter Challenge’ and includes 3 things: 

  1. M/C questions

  2. Short Answer questions

  3. Word Problems

Laptop/computer

Google Chrome web browser (not a Requirement but a STRONG suggestion)

Printer

Scanner (you can use your smart phone if you don’t have a scanner)

Math 9

Mathematics 9 builds upon the fundamental course work in previous years by exploring more complex arithmetic related to the topics of financial literacy, rational numbers, and…

Mathematics 9 builds upon the fundamental course work in previous years by exploring more complex arithmetic related to the topics of financial literacy, rational numbers, and proportional reasoning. It introduces and explores newer these topics: exponents, polynomials, linear relations, linear equations and statistics.

As math education develops beyond the fundamental operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, the concepts and skills become more complex and conceptual. As such, Mathematics 9 will give students a solid foundation for these deeper algebraic and abstract ideas.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Financial Literacy - Students build upon their basic understanding of money but exploring topics like budgets and balance sheets, while also learning the basics of simple and complex interest.

Exponents - This unit introduces the concept of exponents as it relates to both numerical values and algebraic values. The chapter explores the important rules of how to use exponents in various mathematical contexts.

Polynomials - This chapter introduces the concept of the polynomial and how it is defined. It explores how polynomials can be manipulated to combine like terms as well as using the application of the distribution property.

Rational Numbers – This chapter explores the fundamental mathematical operations but using any and all rational numbers including negative numbers, fractions and decimals.

Linear Relations – This chapter introduces the concept of the Cartesian coordinate plane and how to plot points in two-dimensions. It further explores the concept of lines of best fit the corresponding aspect of interpolation and extrapolation.

Linear Equations – This chapter covers the very important concept in algebra of “solving for x.” Students will explore how to manipulate linear equations such that x is on one side of the equation and everything else is put on the other side. 

Proportional Reasoning – This chapter further explores the concept of similarity using ratios and scales. How do blueprints for a house work? And what makes a shape proportional to another?

Statistics – This chapter introduces the idea of probability and explores concepts like averages, medians and modes. It also covers the concept of bias in data collection and analysis.

Assignments:  In each chapter there are study notes to be filled out, an assignment (or a project) and a chapter test.

NOTE: A student at the beginning of the course will choose 2 of 4 possible projects to complete. For the chapters in which they’ve chosen to do a project, they will not need to complete the assignment. 

 

Math 9

Mathematics 9 builds upon the fundamental course work in previous years by exploring more complex arithmetic related to the topics of financial literacy, rational numbers, and…

Mathematics 9 builds upon the fundamental course work in previous years by exploring more complex arithmetic related to the topics of financial literacy, rational numbers, and proportional reasoning. It introduces and explores newer these topics: exponents, polynomials, linear relations, linear equations and statistics.

As math education develops beyond the fundamental operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, the concepts and skills become more complex and conceptual. As such, Mathematics 9 will give students a solid foundation for these deeper algebraic and abstract ideas.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Financial Literacy - Students build upon their basic understanding of money but exploring topics like budgets and balance sheets, while also learning the basics of simple and complex interest.

Exponents - This unit introduces the concept of exponents as it relates to both numerical values and algebraic values. The chapter explores the important rules of how to use exponents in various mathematical contexts.

Polynomials - This chapter introduces the concept of the polynomial and how it is defined. It explores how polynomials can be manipulated to combine like terms as well as using the application of the distribution property.

Rational Numbers – This chapter explores the fundamental mathematical operations but using any and all rational numbers including negative numbers, fractions and decimals.

Linear Relations – This chapter introduces the concept of the Cartesian coordinate plane and how to plot points in two-dimensions. It further explores the concept of lines of best fit the corresponding aspect of interpolation and extrapolation.

Linear Equations – This chapter covers the very important concept in algebra of “solving for x.” Students will explore how to manipulate linear equations such that x is on one side of the equation and everything else is put on the other side. 

Proportional Reasoning – This chapter further explores the concept of similarity using ratios and scales. How do blueprints for a house work? And what makes a shape proportional to another?

Statistics – This chapter introduces the idea of probability and explores concepts like averages, medians and modes. It also covers the concept of bias in data collection and analysis.

Assignments:  In each chapter there are study notes to be filled out, an assignment (or a project) and a chapter test.

NOTE: A student at the beginning of the course will choose 2 of 4 possible projects to complete. For the chapters in which they’ve chosen to do a project, they will not need to complete the assignment. 
 

Physical and Health Education 9

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. Grade 9 main goal is for students to learn how to advocate for the health and well-being of others. It connects us to…

Physical Education  is a required course for all K-9 grades. Grade 9 main goal is for students to learn how to advocate for the health and well-being of others. It connects us to our community and that daily participation in different types of physical activity influences physical literacy and personal health and fitness goals.. The Physical and Health Education (PHE) curriculum aims to empower students to develop a personalized understanding of what healthy living means to them as individuals and members of society in the 21st century. The PHE curriculum focuses on well-being — the connections between physical, intellectual, mental, and social health.PHE is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings that students need for lifelong physical health and mental well-being.Students can apply the knowledge, processes, and skills learned to their daily lives while engaging in an exploration of what healthy living means and looks like for them. With the uniqueness of each student in mind, the curriculum facilitates a deep understanding of both physical and health literacy to provide students with the theoretical and practical foundations to embrace their interests and passions and have a healthy active lifestyle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  •  

    Daily participation in different types of physical activity influences our physical literacy and personal health and fitness goals.

  • Lifelong participation in physical activity has many benefits and is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle

  • Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

  • Healthy relationships can help us lead rewarding and fulfilling lives.

  • Advocating for the health and well-being of others connects us to our community.


This is an individualized course and a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created with consideration of the resources being utilized and based on communication strategies with each family.


Resource materials for this course will be determined in conjunction with the parent, teacher, and student (when possible). 

Kelowna CC - Grade 9

This class will cover Science 9, Social Studies 9 and Career Ed 9. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through…

This class will cover Science 9, Social Studies 9 and Career Ed 9. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as homework to complete all course requirements. This class meets weekly on Wednesdays. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Social Studies: Significant Changes Due to Conflict and Contact, Exploration, Expansion and Colonization, Tensions Created by Opposing Ideas, Inventions, Philosophical and Cultural Shifts in Society

 

Science: Life Processes at the Cellular Level, Behaviour of Matter, Energy Transfer, Plate Tectonics 

 

Career Ed: Knowing Self and Reaching Goals, Diverse Perspectives on Work in the Community, Goal Setting, Labour Market Changes, Career Planning

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the grade 9 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing, oral or written assignments, collaborative activities, and participation.


Attendance at weekly classes September through June.

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components. 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Langley CC - Grade 9

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 9, Social Studies 9, and Applied Design Skills and Technology 9. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate…

This class meets weekly on Thursdays and will cover Science 9, Social Studies 9, and Applied Design Skills and Technology 9. This synchronous face-to-face class will incorporate varied collaborative and independent activities through different modes of learning as well as some homework to complete all course requirements. For more information, see the Learning Groups website.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Science: Life processes of cells. Electromagnetic Energy as particle and wave. Kinetic molecular theory and theory of the atom. Geology and Theory of Plate Tectonics.

 

 

Social Studies- Human and environmental factors and effect on population. 

Exploration, colonization, urbanization, migration and conflict in the Medieval World and Renaissance.

 

Choice of one ADST below

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (A): Woodworking. Sewing and Crocheting. Moodle course ADST: Introduction to ADST and the Design Process

Applied Design, Skills and Technology (B):

Computational Thinking and Digital Literacy with computer programming. Robotics using Dash. Computers and Communications Devices with 3D printing.

 

*topics are subject to change from year to year

Formative and summative assessment of the Grade 9 core and course competencies incorporating varied strategies including group sharing and activities, oral or written assignments, and participation.


 

Attendance at weekly classes from September through June.

 

Completed Online Application link and acceptance required; see the Learning Groups website for further details. These courses are added internally.

 

Completion of all course assignments; in-class and at home components.

 

Review all communication sent from the CC coordinator and teacher, generally through email.

 

 

 

Science 9

In Science 9 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science.   This course is designed to be an engaging, online learning experience for…

In Science 9 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science.   This course is designed to be an engaging, online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, labs experiences, projects, interactive applets and more.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Biology:  learn about genetics,
starting with cell division and
the production of new genetic
material. Take on the role of a
genetic scientist and think about
the ethics of genetic manipulation.

Physics:  electricity is all around
us and most of us are dependent
on it for many aspects of our lives. 
Learn about static and current
electricity, resistance, Ohm’s law
and electrical circuits. Use your
knowledge to design a proposal to
help a First Nations solve their
problem of lack of reliable power.

 

Chemistry:  Everything in the
universe is made of atoms.  Learn
about how our understanding of
the atom has changed over time and
how very small differences in atoms
make huge differences between
elements.  

 

Earth Science:  The earth is our only
home.  Learn about different
ecosystems and the complex complex
set of circumstances necessary to keep
them functioning properly.  Use your
knowledge and your voice to speak out
to protect the world we live in.

 


Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

As well, there are a variety of
hands on activities from projects
to labs which help students gain
a more concrete and practical
understanding of the content.

Activities include making a DNA
model, creating an Art Gallery of
atomic understanding and preparing
for a meeting with a couple seeking
genetic advice.  The course also
includes formal science labs where
students make observations and draw conclusions.


Students need regular access
to an internet connected
computer and the ability to
print and upload assignments.

 

Most supplies for labs and
projects can be found around
the house.

 

Time commitment for this
course is approximately 3 hours
per week.

 

Science 9

In Science 9 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science.   This course is designed to be an engaging, online learning experience for…

In Science 9 there are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science.   This course is designed to be an engaging, online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, labs experiences, projects, interactive applets and more.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Biology:  learn about genetics,
starting with cell division and
the production of new genetic
material. Take on the role of a
genetic scientist and think about
the ethics of genetic manipulation.

Physics:  electricity is all around
us and most of us are dependent
on it for many aspects of our lives. 
Learn about static and current
electricity, resistance, Ohm’s law
and electrical circuits. Use your
knowledge to design a proposal to
help a First Nations solve their
problem of lack of reliable power.

 

Chemistry:  Everything in the
universe is made of atoms.  Learn
about how our understanding of
the atom has changed over time and
how very small differences in atoms
make huge differences between
elements.  

 

Earth Science:  The earth is our only
home.  Learn about different
ecosystems and the complex complex
set of circumstances necessary to keep
them functioning properly.  Use your
knowledge and your voice to speak out
to protect the world we live in.

 


Quizzes to check factual
understanding are a regular
part of this course.  

As well, there are a variety of
hands on activities from projects
to labs which help students gain
a more concrete and practical
understanding of the content.

Activities include making a DNA
model, creating an Art Gallery of
atomic understanding and preparing
for a meeting with a couple seeking
genetic advice.  The course also
includes formal science labs where
students make observations and draw conclusions.


Students need regular access
to an internet connected
computer and the ability to
print and upload assignments.

 

Most supplies for labs and
projects can be found around
the house.

 

Time commitment for this
course is approximately 3 hours
per week.

 

French 9

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 9: Everyday Things:
Belief and Opinions, Taking
things Along, Measurements
and Fractions, In The Kitchen

Unit 10: Places and Events:
Politics and Media, Languages
and Business, Learning and
Memory, Celebrating Holidays


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


4 years of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

French 9

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training​ teaches a…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised: Language Training, Games & Activities, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training​ teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Games & Activities​ help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills. 

3. Live Tutoring​ allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills with native-speaking tutors. Each session builds on and reinforces what you have been learning in LanguageTraining.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 9: Everyday Things:
Belief and Opinions, Taking
things Along, Measurements
and Fractions, In The Kitchen

Unit 10: Places and Events:
Politics and Media, Languages
and Business, Learning and
Memory, Celebrating Holidays


Language training
activities 30%

Homework (Extended
Activities) 10%

Live Tutoring 30%

Live sessions with
teacher 10%

Projects 30%


4 years of French
Instruction

Computer and USB
headset

German 9

Designed for the intermediate German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level D (prerequisite: German Level D). Students will do interactive lessons through the…

Designed for the intermediate German student in Grade 5-9 as a continuation of German Level D (prerequisite: German Level D). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 3

(Units 9 and 10)

  • 1 activation project (2 parts)

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings
    with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 1
    and 2) 

  • 20 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with Internet Required

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

USB Headset with
microphone

 

Mandarin 9

Mandarin 9 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 9 and 10, level 3) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story reading and live…

Mandarin 9 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 9 and 10, level 3) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story reading and live tutorials as well as cultural and FFPOL projects. Students are immersed in the world of Mandarin Chinese language and have the choice of completing the course in Pin Yin, simplified and traditional Chinese. Projects include the activation project which reflect cultural comparisons, First Peoples perspectives, social and cultural activities and an interview with a native Mandarin speaker.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Unit 9 Home and Health:

Activation project, backyard, related verbs and nouns, comparison words, kitchen, bathroom, living room, chore-related verbs, sports, exercise, time-related adverbs: “always,” “never” and “sometimes, body parts, minor injuries, first aid, 

 

Creative Works Project

 

 

Unit 10 Life and World:

 

 

Subjunctive mood, pronouns and adverbs: “everyone,” “everything,” “probably” and “nothing, geography, birth, marriage, death, present perfect, present perfect continuous, cardinal directions, new countries, oceans, types of trees, climatic regions, possessive pronouns, animals, new adjectives, possessive pronoun

 

Interview Project

 

 

Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their pronunciation, matching pictures to the correct phrases, writing, comprehension, games activities and listening skills. Criterion and the rubric for the activation and creative works project are found in the Moodle course.

 

 

Unit 9: Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the activation project and creative works project. Students will also have their first teacher meeting discuss any questions as they start the course. 

 

Unit 10:  Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the interview project where students interview a native Mandarin Chinese speaker. Students will also have 2 general meetings with the teacher to  review their progress in Moodle to ensure that all components outlined in the course are completed and they have submitted completion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish 9

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 9 – Home and Health  

UNIT 10–Life and World


 

  • Activation: read and analyze a Brazilian fairy tale for its cultural elements, then research the titles of other Latin American fairy tales to locate one and do the same with it. 

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 30 minutes for lessons followed by at least 15 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Spanish 9

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations (we call it “Rosetta Stone” for short) program is comprised of three parts: 2 units of language training, games and activities, and live tutoring. The course is designed for students to work at their own pace, but with prescribed time allotments for weekly work, towards an end date in the school year that they choose. They learn new material, practice it in an engaging game or activity setting, interact with a live tutor and submit projects to demonstrate what they are able to do with their new language.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Activation Project

UNIT 9 – Home and Health  

UNIT 10–Life and World


 

  • Activation: read and analyze a Brazilian fairy tale for its cultural elements, then research the titles of other Latin American fairy tales to locate one and do the same with it. 

  • Language lessons

  • Completion of prescribed hours of games and activities totaling 20 hours at the end of 2 units of study

  • Completion of 8 live tutor sessions and 2 teacher meetings

  • A cultural project for each of the 2 units

Students need regular access to an internet connected computer, a headset and the ability to print and upload assignments.

Time commitment for this course is prescribed to be 3 days per week, at least 30 minutes for lessons followed by at least 15 minutes for games and activities.

 

 

Social Studies 9

In Socials 9, students will follow threads of Canadian history up to 1919. Rather than a brief overview of this time period, students are going to look in-depth at crucial moments…

In Socials 9, students will follow threads of Canadian history up to 1919. Rather than a brief overview of this time period, students are going to look in-depth at crucial moments in the past that continue to shape and define countries and cultures around the world today, including Canada. This era was a time of nations striking out to discover new lands, to conquer and grow their empires. It was a time of exploration, colonization, and adapting to new realities. There were also global wars and major revolutions and political stirrings that the world had never seen before.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 30 minutes.

schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Exploration History,

Settlement History,

Aboriginal History in Canada,

Military,

Rebellion and Political
History in Canada.

Students will be assessed on
their understanding of the issues,
events, and key players of the
times and places covering the
exploration era through Canada’s
history through World War One.

Students are required to stream
videos, download and print  or
complete assignments online,
scan (either by taking pictures or
physically scanning) and upload
their assignments within Moodle.

Students must also be able to
commit to weekly classes online.

Social Studies 9

In Socials 9, students will follow threads of Canadian history up to 1919. Rather than a brief overview of this time period, students are going to look in-depth at crucial moments…

In Socials 9, students will follow threads of Canadian history up to 1919. Rather than a brief overview of this time period, students are going to look in-depth at crucial moments in the past that continue to shape and define countries and cultures around the world today, including Canada. This era was a time of nations striking out to discover new lands, to conquer and grow their empires. It was a time of exploration, colonization, and adapting to new realities. There were also global wars and major revolutions and political stirrings that the world had never seen before.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Exploration History,

Settlement History,

Aboriginal History in Canada,

Military,

Rebellion and Political
History in Canada.

Students will be assessed on
their understanding of the issues,
events, and key players of the
times and places covering the
exploration era through Canada’s
history through World War One.

Students are required to stream
videos, download and print  or
complete assignments online,
scan (either by taking pictures or
physically scanning) and upload
their assignments within Moodle.

 

Drafting 10

Designed for the beginning Drafting student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Drafting 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will…

Designed for the beginning Drafting student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Drafting 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Design opportunities

Drafting terminology

Drawing standards and conventions

Scales for different types of drawings

Drafting styles, including perspective, mechanical drafting, and architectural drawing

Modelling using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) software

Coding for creating 3D representations of design solutions

Equipment and tools for manual and computer-aided drafting

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Working computer with Internet required.

Electronics and Robotics 10

In Electronics and Robotics 10, students will learn to build circuits using various components and robot elements. Working with Arduino, students will write code to integrate…

In Electronics and Robotics 10, students will learn to build circuits using various components and robot elements. Working with Arduino, students will write code to integrate sensors and actuators with a microcontroller for a specific purpose. The course will conclude with a final design project which will walk students through the design process and culminate with a presentation. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Coding and Circuitry

  • The number of lessons depends on the curriculum the student chooses to follow.  Options are provided.  

Independent Study

  • Students will choose 6 activities or topics to study from a list of choices

Design Project  

  • All steps of the design project will be studied and put into practice as students make their own robotic device

Lesson projects will be submitted by video in Flipgrid.

Independent Study reports

Each step of the design process will be assessed by the teacher and the student’s self-assessment. 

The final project will be assessed by the teacher and student. 

Students will need to purchase an
Arduino starter kit.  Costs range
from $50 to $120. Options will be suggested during the initial meeting with the teacher.

Family and Society 10

Family & Society is a four-credit ADST course that is an elective course. Because this is an individualized course, students have the freedom and flexibility to accomplish course…

Family & Society is a four-credit ADST course that is an elective course. Because this is an individualized course, students have the freedom and flexibility to accomplish course goals as they wish.  Throughout the course, students will research how issues such as residential schools, economic crises, war & displacement, migration, natural disasters, etc. influence and impact families. 

Students will determine what cultural factors define the term “family”?  As well as what God’s word says about family. 

They will choose an idea to pursue for their 4 main projects while keeping other viable ideas open.  Students are expected to submit their project to the class digital magazine.  

While students are free to meet requirements in their own way, there are resources and assignment suggestions in place for those who require it.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Course is based on 4 major projects. 

Above those projects, students are expected to complete smaller assignments to meet other competencies for grade 10 Family & Society.

 

Students will complete 4 projects which will contribute to most of their grade.  Students are free to be very creative with these projects and how they wish to display their learning (essay, collage, PowerPoint, etc)

Smaller assignments will be graded accordingly.

Computer (access to Moodle, digital magazine & research)

Additional resources to be determined with teacher.

 

Food Studies 10

It is amazing that God not only made us to need food, but also to enjoy it!  Food Studies 10 gives students an opportunity to explore hands on learning through an individualized…

It is amazing that God not only made us to need food, but also to enjoy it! 

Food Studies 10 gives students an opportunity to explore hands on learning through an individualized approach. With a focus on practical cooking, students explore and gain skills in cooking a variety for recipes. They will also explore topics such as safety, nutrition and global issues in food. Students will work with their teacher to create a Learning Plan for their course, and report on their progress through cooking updates and project work.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Hands on cooking! 

Kitchen Safety

Health and Nutrition

First Peoples’ traditional food practices

Food in a Global Village

Assessment through this course is done via weekly
updates on cooking and project work. Students
are encouraged to explore the majority of this course through hands on learning.


Access to kitchen tools and appliances

A variety of ingredients

Access to the internet for researching recipes, techniques and project work

Media Design 10

Media Design 10 will enable students to explore and gain skills in the creation of digital art using professional software. Students will learn and apply principles of design and…

Media Design 10 will enable students to explore and gain skills in the creation of digital art using professional software. Students will learn and apply principles of design and storytelling while creating personalized projects in Photoshop, graphic & character design, video & movie production, sound design, web design and/or photography. This class requires the use of a computer, though no prior computer experience is required. The visual communication skills learned in this course will enhance your skillset for a wide variety of careers ranging from Technology and Arts to Business and Sciences.

Students may participate in activities such as:​

  • Editing and creating compositions in Adobe Photoshop

  • Using graphics software to create illustrations, logos

  • Editing video and create short movies

  • Learning principles of cinematography, lighting and storytelling for movies & animation.

  • Creating simple websites

  • Learning basic photographic principles

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Personal design choices require self-exploration and refinement of skills.

Social, ethical, and sustainability considerations impact design choices.

 

Tools and technology have an impact on people’s lives.

 

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Possible software resources:

  • Adobe Suite – including Photoshop, In-Design, Illustrator, Premiere, DreamWeaver and Lightroom

  • DaVinci Resolve, Shotcut, OpenShot, Kdenlive (for video editing)

  • Gimp, Blender, Inkscape (for graphic design)

  • Blender (for Animation)

  • Notepad ++, Bluefish Editor, Quanta Plus, Amaya, KompoZer (for web design)

  • LightZone, DarkTable (for photography)

Metalwork 10

Designed for the beginning Metalwork student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Metalwork 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will…

Designed for the beginning Metalwork student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Metalwork 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Design opportunities
  • Proper storage and
    organization of tools and
    equipment
  • Selection of metal for size,
    shape, and finish
  • Common gauges of metal
  • Identification of ferrous and
    non-ferrous materials and
    carbon content
  • Start-up, shutdown, and
    handling procedures for
    compressed gas cylinders
  • Precision measurement
  • Cutting threads
  • Mechanical fasteners and fastening methods
  • Methods for laying out, forming,and joining metal
  • Precision grinding
  • Computer numerical control (CNC) applications
  • Reading and preparing
    drawings, plans, and cutting lists
  • Ethics of cultural appropriation in design process
This is an individualized course,
a student learning plan will be
created for personalized learning
for each student. As such, the
assessment methods will be created
in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Access to Metal working tools and machines.

Working computer with Internet required.

 

Metalwork 10

Designed for the beginning Metalwork student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Metalwork 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will…

Designed for the beginning Metalwork student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Metalwork 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Design opportunities

Proper storage and organization of tools and equipment

Selection of metal for size, shape, and finish

Common gauges of metal

Identification of ferrous and non-ferrous materials and carbon content

Start-up, shutdown, and handling procedures for compressed gas cylinders

Precision measurement

Cutting threads

Mechanical fasteners and fastening methods

Methods for laying out, forming,and joining metal

Precision grinding

Computer numerical control (CNC) applications

Reading and preparing drawings, plans, and cutting lists

Ethics of cultural appropriation in design process

This is an individualized course, a student learning
plan will be created for personalized learning for
each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.


Access to Metal working tools and machines.

Working computer with Internet required.

 

Power Technology 10

Designed for students that are interested in everything power, including internal and external combustion, alternative energy sources and related topics . Students in collaboration…

Designed for students that are interested in everything power, including internal and external combustion, alternative energy sources and related topics . Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Internal and external combustion

Components of a combustion engine

Non-fuel power systems

Disassembly and assembly sequences

Engine terminology

Lubrication and antifriction

Hydraulic and pneumatic systems

Transfer and conversion of energy

Hand tools and power tools specific to mechanical repair and maintenance

Torques and tolerances for specific operations

Fasteners and fittings

Energy transmission and conversion systems

Technologies that reduce energy use and waste

Historical and potential future impact of energy, power, and transportation systems on society and the environment

Alternate energy sources

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.


Hand tools and power tools specific to mechanical repair and maintenance.

Working computer with Internet required.

 

Technology Explorations 10

Designed to provide flexibility for students to study a number of different areas in the Technology Education field. It is expected that at least six topics from the content column…

Designed to provide flexibility for students to study a number of different areas in the Technology Education field. It is expected that at least six topics from the content column will be selected from at least two curricular areas to best meet the needs of the students.  Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Content areas from:

Woodwork 10
Metalwork 10
Electronics and Robotics 10
Power Technology 10
Drafting 10

 

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan
will be created for personalized learning for each student.
As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Various hand tools and power tools specific to individual content areas.

 

Working computer with Internet required.

 

Textiles 10

Textiles 10 is a four-credit ADST course that is an elective course. Because this is an individualized course, students have the freedom and flexibility to accomplish course…

Textiles 10 is a four-credit ADST course that is an elective course. Because this is an individualized course, students have the freedom and flexibility to accomplish course goals as they wish.  Throughout the course, students will identify and use appropriate tools, technologies, materials, and processes for production.  

They will choose an idea to pursue for their 3 main sewing projects as well as one non-sewing project while keeping other viable ideas open.  Students are expected to submit their non-sewing project to the class digital magazine.  

While students are free to meet requirements in their own way, there are resources and assignment suggestions in place for those who require it.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Sewing project #1
Sewing project #2
Sewing project #3

Non-sewing project
(research, creativity)

Above those projects, students
are expected to complete smaller assignments to meet other competencies for grade 10
textiles.

 

Students will complete 3 sewing
projects which will contribute to
most of their grade.  The non-
sewing project is another larger
project that will be graded heavily. Smaller assignments will be graded accordingly.

Computer (access to Moodle, digital magazine & research)

Sewing machine in good working order.

 

Patterns, fabric, notions.

 

Web Development 10

Web Development encompasses the evolving processes, systems, and tools for creating, communicating, storing, retrieving, and modifying information. As students design, share, and…

Web Development encompasses the evolving processes, systems, and tools for creating, communicating, storing, retrieving, and modifying information. As students design, share, and adapt knowledge in critical, ethical, purposeful, and innovative ways, they gain perspective on the long-term implications of life in a digital, connected world and develop skills to responsibly take ownership of these technologies to augment learning and benefit society.

Web Development builds on students’ natural curiosity, inventiveness, and desire to create and work in practical ways. It gives them skills to be able to carve out a place in the world for them to create, be heard, and produce meaningful experiences.

Biblical Integration: We are called to disciple the world through a relationship with Jesus Christ. We have been given gifts that we must strengthen and find ways to use them to help others. Never before has the world needed people with such a digital and technological skill set that is changing literally every day. By understanding what God wants of our lives we can then hone our talents and skills to serve him.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

This course consists of 10 units with various lessons and activities. The projects and assignments are accomplished through understanding, practicing, memorizing, and adapting the code which takes time. On average each concept takes about 1.5 to 2 weeks to try, implement, adapt, and master using three, 2 hour sessions each week. The major project that spans throughout the course is a comprehensive project that should exhibit the student’s mastery over the topics found in the course. Furthermore, the final project begins at the end of the course and can take anywhere from 3 to 5 weeks to complete.

Students are required to view and read each unit and its corresponding lesson(s). They will then use the lesson’s code and concept(s) as reference to try to implement the code on their own and make adaptations where needed. Students will also have to debug errors in their code to achieve the desired outcome - often without direct guidance. Once finished, images of the student’s screen must be taken and submitted to the teacher with the modified HTML file associated with the unit and lesson. 
  • A computer that can access the internet
  • Access to Adobe Suite would be beneficial

Woodwork 10

Designed for the beginning Woodworking student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Woodwork 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher…

Designed for the beginning Woodworking student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a Woodwork 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Project design opportunities

Importance of woodwork in historical and current cultural contexts of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit communities, and other cultural contexts

Ethics of cultural appropriation in design process

Identification, characteristics, properties, and uses of wood from various species

Choices related to the sustainable use of wood

Uses and creation of plans and drawings

Techniques for stock breakout and woodworking using a variety of tools and equipment, including stationary power equipment

Function, uses, and role of portable and stationary power equipment in the creation of a project

Function and use of hand tools

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Access to Woodworking tools and machines.

Working computer with Internet required.

 

Work Experience 10

The Work Experience 10 course is designed to support and empower students as they enter the workforce. Safety is a big part of this process as we want to ensure these young workers…

The Work Experience 10 course is designed to support and empower students as they enter the workforce. Safety is a big part of this process as we want to ensure these young workers know their rights and stay safe. Students need to have secured employment, complete 100 hours of work and complete safety and employability assignments.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Safety
Students will be introduced to workplace safety and worker rights information.

Employability
Employability skills are important. As you become aware of these skills students can hone them and make themselves more employable in future situations. 

Work and Reflection
The bulk of the hours spent on this course will be in a workplace environment. Students will report hours and reflect upon their work experience.


There are two main safety assignments a test and a series of reflections based on safety videos.

The employability assignments includes personal reflection as well as some skill building aspects including the rights and responsibilities of a worker in the workplace.

Students are required to keep a work log, gather a workplace assessment from their supervisor and reflect upon the work they completed and skills they have developed.


 


Students need to have secured or plan to secure work or volunteer work where they will be able to complete 100 hours of work experience. 

Access to a printer is highly suggested for printing of lab assignments and notes pages.

 

Art Studio 10

People perceive much of the world through how they see it. God created a complex and beautiful place filled with detail and minutia. The visual arts offer a unique opportunity for…

People perceive much of the world through how they see it. God created a complex and beautiful place filled with detail and minutia. The visual arts offer a unique opportunity for students to develop their perception of the world, their craft to imitate and emulate what they see created around them and through recorded history. We live in a large canvas full of colour, beauty, sound, and life. Image development involves students engaging actively in a purposeful design process. Students will use a variety of common art materials, technologies, and processes to organize the visual elements and principles of design. Students will be expected to maintain a sketchbook, learn how to apply colour and use value. They will be asked to research individuals from Art History and express and investigate identity through a mask making assignment.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Art Diary

How to Draw Beetles in Colour

How to Draw a Tiger in Oil Pastels

Plaster Masks, Identity and Self Expression

Picasso Heads

Canadiana Art History and Replicas in various media

Interpreting a Biblical Narrative

Sketchbook/Art Diary entries 

Major Assignments

Process images

Access to a scanner or camera to capture
images and share work.  

Various Art materials such as paper, pencils,
pencil crayons, oil pastels, plaster bandage
or paper mache materials (glue and water)
and either acrylic or watercolour paint.

 

Art Studio 10

The Art Studio 10 course is intended to allow students to interact with a broad selection and combination of materials, technologies and processes. Students are asked to…

The Art Studio 10 course is intended to allow students to interact with a broad selection and combination of materials, technologies and processes. Students are asked to investigate art from different perspectives roles and traditions. It is hoped that through projects and sketchbooks students will investigate personal and communal identity. Students have a great opportunity to communicate to an audience, to visually communicate as a form of worship exploring how they can live out the great commission through visual communication and socially responsible statements in their compositions.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Sketchbook

Art History

 

Major Assignment Focuses
-Elements and Principles of Design Series 
-Social or Environmental Issues
-Mixed Media
-Independent Works
-Biblical Theme or NarrativeAssignment

 

 

 

 

 

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan
will be created for personalized learning for each
student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Access to a scanner or camera to capture
images and share work.  

Various Art materials such as paper,
pencils, pencil crayons and either acrylic or watercolour paint.

 

Choral Music: Chamber Choir 10

This course is for people singing in ensemble settings including Concert Choir, Chamber Choir and/or Vocal Jazz Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements …

This course is for people singing in ensemble settings including Concert Choir, Chamber Choir and/or Vocal Jazz

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections
with music

 

Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application
and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are
the largest component of
assessment); assessment will be
both on individual vocal skill
and expression, as well as
overall ensemble repertoire and ability

120 hours of time spent on
music between lessons,
practicing, performances
and written work

6 update assignments

 

6 critical thinking assignments

 

2 portfolios of music (including
both solo and ensemble
examples)

 

Choral Music: Concert Choir 10

This course is for people singing in ensemble settings including Concert Choir, Chamber Choir and/or Vocal Jazz Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements …

This course is for people singing in ensemble settings including Concert Choir, Chamber Choir and/or Vocal Jazz

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

ExpressionRepertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections
with music

 


Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application
and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are
the largest component of assessment);
assessment will be both on individual
vocal skill and expression, as well as
overall ensemble repertoire and ability

120 hours of time spent on
music between lessons,
practicing, performances and
written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music (including
both solo and ensemble examples)

 

Choral Music: Virtual Choir 10-12

You have a unique voice that deserves to be heard! Join other talented young singers across BC as we create four virtual choir videos in this authentically online ensemble.  This…

You have a unique voice that deserves to be heard! Join other talented young singers across BC as we create four virtual choir videos in this authentically online ensemble.  This powerhouse course counts towards your graduating elective credits and will propel you to the next level as a musician. We will be empowering you in topics like; how can I record myself well at home; what is the best new music right now; what vocal styles work best for my voice; what musical tools do I need to collaborate with other musicians; how can I become more powerful as a singer and more.  This year will be unique for many of us in the music world; why not take the time to create something meaningful as a group with this online ensemble.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Vocal Techniques and Personal Style; R&B, Gospel, Soul etc.

Recording Techniques (developing an on-camera presence etc.)

Personal Musical Exploration (inquiry based learning on musical topics of your choice)

Tools of the trade (ear training, harmonizing techniques, sight-reading)

Powerhouse Vocals (social justice movements and freedom fighters that have used song to overcome oppression (ex. Estonia)

 

 

A variety of formative and summative options.  

 

Formative testing will involve at-home practice sessions where students sing passages from each song until they reach 80% accuracy.  

 

Students will attend online weekly “vocal coaching sessions” where they will develop skills and submit samples of their work.

 

Summative assessments will include inquiry based learning on each student’s musical interests and passion projects. 

 

Our final four summative submissions will be the recordings of yourself that you submit to be part of the four virtual choir pieces

No prior experience required but it will be helpful.  This course will build on your current musical skill (beginner to advanced).

 

Each student needs, in the least, access to a cell phone or computer microphone for self-recording. 

 

 

Students will be encouraged to use more advanced technology if they already own/have access to it.

 

Choral Music: Vocal Jazz 10

This course is for people singing in ensemble settings including Concert Choir, Chamber Choir and/or Vocal Jazz Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements …

This course is for people singing in ensemble settings including Concert Choir, Chamber Choir and/or Vocal Jazz

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections
with music

 


Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application
and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are
the largest component of assessment);
assessment will be both on individual
vocal skill and expression, as well as
overall ensemble repertoire and ability

120 hours of time spent on
music between lessons,
practicing, performances and
written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music (including
both solo and ensemble examples)

 

Contemporary Music 10

A general music course for students playing piano, ukulele, banjo, drums, solo voice, or any other type of music that wouldn’t typically be found in a campus school music class. …

A general music course for students playing piano, ukulele, banjo, drums, solo voice, or any other type of music that wouldn’t typically be found in a campus school music class.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections with music

 

Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application and
analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are the
largest component of assessment)


120 hours of time spent on music
between lessons, practicing,
performances and written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music

 

Dance Choreography 10

This course is for those who love to dance and more importantly love to choregraph. The assignments are focused on choreography, the history of choreography and self-reflection…

This course is for those who love to dance and more importantly love to choregraph. The assignments are focused on choreography, the history of choreography and self-reflection about pieces you've dance in and created yourself. If you have a passion for dance this course is for you! 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Elements of dance and compositional skills are the foundation of choreography.

Dance offers unique ways of exploring our identity and sense of belonging.

Choreographers use the dancer's body as an instrument to translate movement ideas from abstract to concrete.

Choreographers communicate through creative expression in dance.

Choreographers collaborate through critical reflection, creative co-operation, and the exchange of ideas. 

An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. Students should be enrolled a local dance program within their community. If this isn't an option, please contact the teacher before enrollment. 

Dance Foundations 10

This course is for students who are participating in a regular dance class of any genre! Join fellow dancers as you share your experiences, reflect on your growth and look a bit…

This course is for students who are participating in a regular dance class of any genre! Join fellow dancers as you share your experiences, reflect on your growth and look a bit deeper into some of the impact dance has had on the different countries, generations and you! 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Dance offers unique ways of exploring our identity and sense of belonging.

Individual and collective expression is rooted in history, culture, community and values.

Growth as a dance and choreographer requries perseverance resilience and reflection. 

The body is an instrument for artistic expression.

Traditions, perspectives, worldviews, and stories are shared through aesthetic experiences. 

An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

The hybrid version of the course has:

  • 4 journal reflections
  • reserach project
  • dance safety poster
  • dance hours log
  • two portfolio submissions (video of you dancing!)

Students should be enrolled a local dance program within their community. If this isn't an option, please contact the teacher before enrollment. 

Dance Technique and Performance 10

Are you focussing on a specific technique, style, or genre in your dance learning? This course allows for a deep dive into a specific area, honing skills while looking at the large…

Are you focussing on a specific technique, style, or genre in your dance learning? This course allows for a deep dive into a specific area, honing skills while looking at the large impact that dance has universally. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Growth as a dancer require perseverance, resilience and risk taking.

Dancers collaborate through critical reflection, creative co-operation, and the exchange of ideas.

Dance technique and performance skills are embodied and developed in a variety of genres or styles.

Dancers create, perform, and respond to dance as an art form.

Aesthetic experiences have the power to transform the way we see, think and feel.

An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Students should be enrolled a local dance program within their community. If this isn't an option, please contact the teacher before enrollment. 

Drama 10

This course is a great fit for students involved in acting classes, drama coop, improv troupe, or a church drama team. It is possible to pursue this course from home, but students…

This course is a great fit for students involved in acting classes, drama coop, improv troupe, or a church drama team. It is possible to pursue this course from home, but students must be highly self-motivated and willing to work together with the teacher to create a personalized, project-based course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Drama 10 provides students with an opportunity to 

  • develop their ability to communicate ideas, emotions,
    and perspectives through movement, sound, imagery, and language

  • cultivate creativity and collaboration skills

  • create personal and cultural connections

  • grow as an artist in risk-taking, perseverance, resilience, and reflection

 


Drama 10 will begin with
the collaborative creation of
a personalized student learning
plan (SLP). As such, the assessment methods will be
created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

Activation criteria will be determined as a part of the
SLP creation process.

A typical guideline is one drama course at a time and
one course per production.

Instrumental Music: Concert Band 10

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing. This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of…

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing.

This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of freedom to choose the repertoire, genre, level, and environment for your music, there are online assignments for you to complete to show that all curricular goals have been met and to demonstrate your skill level and understanding of music.

Note that this course is not appropriate for vocal work or piano playing. For solo vocal work or piano playing, please take the Contemporary Music course. For ensemble singing, please take either the Contemporary Music course or the Choral Music course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections with music

Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are the largest component of assessment)

120 hours of time spent on music between lessons, practicing, performances and written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music

 

Instrumental Music: Guitar 10

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing. This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of…

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing.

This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of freedom to choose the repertoire, genre, level, and environment for your music, there are online assignments for you to complete to show that all curricular goals have been met and to demonstrate your skill level and understanding of music.

Note that this course is not appropriate for vocal work or piano playing. For solo vocal work or piano playing, please take the Contemporary Music course. For ensemble singing, please take either the Contemporary Music course or the Choral Music course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections with music

 

Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are the largest component of assessment)

120 hours of time spent on music between lessons, practicing, performances and written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music

 

Instrumental Music: Jazz Band 10

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing. This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of…

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing.

This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of freedom to choose the repertoire, genre, level, and environment for your music, there are online assignments for you to complete to show that all curricular goals have been met and to demonstrate your skill level and understanding of music.

Note that this course is not appropriate for vocal work or piano playing. For solo vocal work or piano playing, please take the Contemporary Music course. For ensemble singing, please take either the Contemporary Music course or the Choral Music course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections with music

Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are the largest component of assessment)

120 hours of time spent on music between lessons, practicing, performances and written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music

 

Instrumental Music: Orchestra 10

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing. This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of…

Instrumental music courses include guitar, jazz band, concert band, or strings/orchestra playing.

This music course is a hybrid music course, meaning that while you have a lot of freedom to choose the repertoire, genre, level, and environment for your music, there are online assignments for you to complete to show that all curricular goals have been met and to demonstrate your skill level and understanding of music.

Note that this course is not appropriate for vocal work or piano playing. For solo vocal work or piano playing, please take the Contemporary Music course. For ensemble singing, please take either the Contemporary Music course or the Choral Music course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Practicing

Performing/Portfolios

Technique

Expression

Repertoire

Music & Meaning

Music & Society

Personal connections with music

Written assignments

Practicing and skill-building

Critical thinking, application and analysis of musical topics

Portfolios of music (these are the largest component of assessment)

120 hours of time spent on music between lessons, practicing, performances and written work

6 update assignments

6 critical thinking assignments

2 portfolios of music

 

Musical Theatre 10

This course is a great fit for students involved with musical theatre classes, coop, or production in their community. Major Units and Topics Assessment …

This course is a great fit for students involved with musical theatre classes, coop, or production in their community.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Musical Theatre 10 provides students with an opportunity to 

  • express ideas, meaning, and emotions through drama, music, and dance

 

  • grow as an artist in risk-taking, perseverance, resilience, and reflection

 

  • develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between theatre and culture

 

Students will share their progress in learning through the following: 

  • ongoing activity log 

 

  • ongoing reflections 

  • self-assessment 

  • two performance samples (video or director report) 

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course.

 


Students must be involved with musical theatre classes, coop, or production in their community.

A typical guideline is one theatre course at a time and one course per production. 

 

Students involved in more than one theatre production (100 hrs+/each) are eligible to take more than one theatre course at a time, but should discuss this with their HCOS theatre teacher before enrolling in the second course.

 

Photography 10

Visual Arts Photography 10 is a Fine Arts course focusing on a beginner’s look at photography in society, history, culture and media.  Throughout the course students will learn why…

Visual Arts Photography 10 is a Fine Arts course focusing on a beginner’s look at photography in society, history, culture and media.  Throughout the course students will learn why we take pictures as well as the basic fundamentals of how to take a good photo.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Introduction to Cameras

  • Lighting and Composition

  • History and Culture Through the Lens

  • Style and Expression

 

  • Written work

  • Quizzes 

  • Four photo projects using themes for
    inspiration including one final project worth 20% of the total grade.

Students must have a camera of some
sort for this course.  This could be a
small point and shoot, and dSLR
or even a camera phone if that is all that is available to them.

Studio Arts 2D 10

The Studio Art 2D 10 course is intended to allow students to interact with a broad selection and combination of 2D materials, technologies and processes. Typically this is a…

The Studio Art 2D 10 course is intended to allow students to interact with a broad selection and combination of 2D materials, technologies and processes. Typically this is a painting and drawing course. Here 2D digital work is also considered a drawing or painting medium. Students are asked to investigate art from different perspectives roles and traditions. It is hoped that through projects and sketchbooks students will investigate personal and communal identity. Students have a great opportunity to communicate to an audience, to visually communicate as a form of worship exploring how they can live out the great commission through visual communication and socially responsible statements in their compositions.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Sketchbook

Art History

Major Assignment Focuses
-Elements and Principles of Design Series 
-Social or Environmental Issues
-Mixed Media
-Independent Works
-Biblical Theme or NarrativeAssignment

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan
will be created for personalized learning for each
student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Access to a scanner or camera to capture images and share work.  

Various Art materials such as paper, pencils, pencil crayons and either acrylic or watercolour paint.

Studio Arts 3D 10

The Studio Arts 3D 10 course is intended to allow students to interact with a broad selection and combination of 3D materials, technologies and processes. Students are asked to…

The Studio Arts 3D 10 course is intended to allow students to interact with a broad selection and combination of 3D materials, technologies and processes. Students are asked to investigate art from different perspectives roles and traditions. It is hoped that through projects and sketchbooks students will investigate personal and communal identity. Students have a great opportunity to communicate to an audience, to visually communicate as a form of worship exploring how they can live out the great commission through visual communication and socially responsible statements in their compositions.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Sketchbook

Art History

 

Major Assignment Focuses
-Elements and Principles of Design Series 
-Social or Environmental Issues
-Mixed Media
-Independent Works
-Biblical Theme or NarrativeAssignment

 

 

 

 

 


This is an individualized course, a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.

Access to a scanner or camera to capture images and share work.  

Various Art materials such as paper, pencils, pencil crayons, carving tools and selected 3D materials such as soapstone, wood or wool fibre.

 

Theatre Company 10

This course is a great fit for students eager to develop and demonstrate their performance skills through theatre classes, coop, or production in their community. Major…

This course is a great fit for students eager to develop and demonstrate their performance skills through theatre classes, coop, or production in their community.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Theatre Company 10 provides students with an opportunity to 

  • develop their ability to communicate ideas, emotions, and perspectives through movement, sound, imagery, and language

  • cultivate creativity and collaboration skills

  • create personal and cultural connections

  • grow as an artist in perseverance, collaboration, and reflection

 

 

Students will share their progress in learning through the following: 

  • ongoing activity log 

  • ongoing reflections 

  • self-assessment 

  • two performance samples (video or director report) 

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course.

Students must be involved with theatre performance classes and/or performing in a theatre production in order to take this course.

A typical guideline is one theatre course at a time and one course per production. 

Students involved in more than one theatre production (100 hrs+/each) are eligible to take more than one theatre course at a time, but should discuss this with their HCOS theatre teacher before enrolling in the second course. 

 

Theatre Production 10

This course is a great fit for students eager to develop and demonstrate their design skills in lighting, sound, costuming, make-up, set, management, and/or direction. …

This course is a great fit for students eager to develop and demonstrate their design skills in lighting, sound, costuming, make-up, set, management, and/or direction.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Theatre Production 10 provides students with an opportunity to 

  • develop their ability to communicate ideas, emotions, and perspectives through movement, sound, imagery, and language

  • cultivate creativity and collaboration skills

  • create personal and cultural connections

  • grow as an artist in perseverance, collaboration, and reflection

 

 

Students will share their progress in learning through the following: 

  • ongoing activity log 

  • ongoing reflections 

  • self-assessment 

  • work samples (photos, videos, director review)

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course.


Students must be working on lighting, sound, set, costume, and/or management for an actual theatre production in their community to take this course

A typical guideline is one theatre course at a time and one course per production. 

Students involved in more than one theatre production (100 hrs+/each) are eligible to take more than one theatre course at a time, but should discuss this with their HCOS theatre teacher before enrolling in the second course.

 

Career Life Education

Career Life Education is the first course of two Grad Program Career Education courses. CLE is about preparing for BC Graduation and beginning to think about life beyond secondary…

Career Life Education is the first course of two Grad Program Career Education courses. CLE is about preparing for BC Graduation and beginning to think about life beyond secondary school.  In this course, the student takes time to consider who they have been created to be and dream about where they hope to go.  They will examine the following questions, who am I, where am I going, how do I get where I want to go, who can support me, and what tools do I need for the journey?  Together, teacher, parents and the student will explore the student’s plans and hopes, as well as get to know their gifts and talents. This course will be using the leading Career Education Resource in Canada called, My Blueprint as a resource and digital portfolio space.  In Career Life Education it is important that the student takes time to self-reflect and listen to what the Lord is calling them towards. In this, we recognise that the student is beginning to prepare for the amazing future God has prepared in advance for them.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

The course Big Ideas and Competencies
have been divided into
five Inquiry unit topics:

Unit 1: Who Am I?

Unit 2: Where am I going?

Unit 3: How do I get where I want to go?

Unit 4: Who will support me on my journey?

Unit 5: What do I need for my journey?

Students will be creating a
well-developed Digital Career
Portfolio throughout the entire
course by completing a variety
of activities as research to answer
the Inquiry unit topics.  

 

This portfolio is shared with a
mentor or guardian at various
points through the course as
students answer the question, “Am I going the right way?”

 

Career Life Education

Career Life Education is the first course of two Grad Program Career Education courses. CLE is about preparing for BC Graduation and beginning to think about life beyond secondary…

Career Life Education is the first course of two Grad Program Career Education courses. CLE is about preparing for BC Graduation and beginning to think about life beyond secondary school.  In this course, the student takes time to consider who they have been created to be and dream about where they hope to go. They will examine the following questions, who am I, what is my plan, what tools do I need for the journey?  Students will also think about their connections and support network as they begin to plan for their post-secondary transition as well as how they plan for their future in a changing world.  This course it a lot about self-reflection and listening to what the Lord is calling the student towards and in this we recognise that the student is beginning to prepare for the amazing future God has prepared in advance for them.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

The course Big Ideas and
Competencies have been
divided into five Inquiry
unit topics:

Unit 1: Who am I?

Unit 2: What is my plan?

Unit 3: Tools for the journey

Unit 4: Skills and Balance in a Changing World 

Unit 5: Final Project:
Dynamic Portfolio

Students complete various
assignments, and activities
throughout the course.  At
the end of the course, students
assemble an online portfolio
to reflect their learning.  This
portfolio is also shared with a mentor/guardian.

Completed Grade 9 Career Education

Career Life Education

Have you ever wanted to connect and meet HCOS students in a meaningful way?  Then this is the course for you!  In this synchronous course, we will follow the outline of the online…

Have you ever wanted to connect and meet HCOS students in a meaningful way?  Then this is the course for you!  In this synchronous course, we will follow the outline of the online CLE course together.  In our weekly meetings, we will be talking with working individuals who are living out their faith within their careers in a series called, “Christians in the Workplace”.  You will get to hear from a pastor, grocery store manager, nurse, counselor, doctor, teacher, electrician, engineer, urban planner, accountant, personal trainer and more! We will then apply our learning to help you examine who am I, what is my plan, what tools do I need for the journey? This course it a lot about self-reflection and listening to what the Lord is calling you towards and in this we recognise that you are just beginning to prepare for the amazing future God has prepared in advance for you.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

The course Big Ideas and
Competencies have been
divided into five Inquiry
unit topics:

Unit 1: Who am I?

Unit 2: What is my plan?

Unit 3: Tools for the journey

Unit 4: Skills and Balance in a Changing World 

Unit 5: Final Project:
Dynamic Portfolio

Students complete various
assignments, and activities
throughout the course.  At
the end of the course, students
assemble an online portfolio
to reflect their learning.  This
portfolio is also shared with a

mentor/guardian.

Completed Grade 9

Career Education

Humanities 10 - Leadership 10

    IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS OPTIONAL ADDITIONAL COURSE TO THE HUM10 PROGRAM, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO: • Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10…

 

 

IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS OPTIONAL ADDITIONAL COURSE TO THE HUM10 PROGRAM, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO:

• Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10 (4 credits) 

• Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10 (4 credits)

• Humanities 10 – Composition 10 (2 credits)

• Humanities 10 – Literary Studies 10 (2 credits)

Humanities 10 is far more than just a 4 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. The option to add Leadership 10, featuring a deep dive into the joy of Gospel Leadership, is an efficient way to build a high school graduation transcript attractive to both post-secondary employers and institutions of higher education. 

In Mark 8: 43-45, we are given a glimpse into the essence of Gospel Leadership.

And calling the crowd to him with his disciples, he said to them, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel's will save it.

Along with receiving full credit for the core Humanities program, students who serve at home, at church, and/or in the community can get valuable course credit and recognition for their efforts. Encouragement and guidance through debriefing sessions focusing on the Gospel Leadership model are a key aspect of this additional feature to the core Humanities 10 program.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  •  

    Topic 1: The Example of Gospel Leadership

     

    Topic 2: The Foundation of Gospel Leadership

     

    Topic 3: The Humility of Gospel Leadership

     

    Topic 4: The Courage of Gospel Leadership

     

    Topic 5: The Purpose of Gospel Leadership

 

Virtual Live Event Log

Leadership Journal

 

Mentor Interview

 

Event Leadership



 

Access to volunteer or paid leadership opportunities

at home, at church, and/or in the community is an asset. 

Leadership 10

  Servanthood is a crucial aspect of Gospel Leadership. A crucial part of Gospel Leadership is submission. In the Leadership 10 course, students will explore and examine…

 

Servanthood is a crucial aspect of Gospel Leadership. A crucial part of Gospel Leadership is submission. In the Leadership 10 course, students will explore and examine Biblical examples of leadership and begin to develop an understanding of how their own talents and giftedness interface with the principles of Gospel Leadership.

In Mark 8: 43-45, we are given a glimpse into the essence of Gospel Leadership.

And calling the crowd to him with his disciples, he said to them, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel's will save it.

Leadership fundamentally is a spiritual endeavour that involves submission and obedience to the leading of the Spirit of God.

In Leadership 10, students will have the opportunity to develop and employ leadership skills. This will require reflection and prayer over experiences and projects while working in community with peer leaders interested in blessing both HCOS and surrounding local communities.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Topic 1: The Example of Gospel Leadership

 

Topic 2: The Foundation of Gospel Leadership

 

 

Topic 3: The Humility of Gospel Leadership

 

 

Topic 4: The Courage of Gospel Leadership

 

 

Topic 5: The Purpose of Gospel Leadership

 

Major Event 1:  15%

Major Event 2:  15%

Major Event 3:  15%

Major Event 4:  15%

Virtual Live Event Log:  20%

Leadership Journal:  20%

 

No prerequisites.

 

Access to volunteer or paid

leadership opportunities at home,

at church, and/or in the community

is an asset and will enable efficient

course completion.

 

Christian Studies: Becoming a People of Promise

Course description to come. Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Course description to come.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Christian Studies: Discovering the Need for a Saviour

Course description to come. Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Course description to come.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Christian Studies: Discovering Who You Are

Course description coming soon. Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Course description coming soon.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Christian Studies: Exploring History, the Bible and Evidence for Christ

Ever asked yourself questions about the New Testament, like “How did we get our Bible?” or “How do I know the Bible is inspired by God?” or “What sources outside the Bible confirm…

Ever asked yourself questions about the New Testament, like “How did we get our Bible?” or “How do I know the Bible is inspired by God?” or “What sources outside the Bible confirm the existence of Jesus?” Or maybe, “What evidence is there that Jesus actually rose from the dead?” or “How can a loving God allow things live evil and hell?” or “How can I share my faith in a thoughtful and intelligent way?” If you have, you’ll be right at home in this course!

This course is an Apologetics introduction module that explores some of these significant topics, Apologetics being a branch of theology that attempts to provide a rational defense for the truth claims of Christianity. In it, you can expect to learn more about how historians, archeologists, and theologians throughout history and in our modern age have articulated how faith aligns with experience and evidence.

Students are prompted throughout the course to also engage with their heart responses to these big questions, putting them side by side with the more intellectually-focused topics.

*Note: If you intend to take APOL1 and APOL2, we recommend doing these in numerical order, as they collectively build a ground-up case for the veracity of the Christian worldview. However, these modules can be done separately, and neither is a prerequisite for the other.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Unit 1 – Why Believe the Bible? (Manuscripts, Archeology, Prophecy, Science)
  • Unit 2 – Historical Reliability of the New Testament
  • Unit 3 – The Deity and Claims of Christ
  • Unit 4 – Evidence for the Death and Resurrection of Jesus
  • Unit 5 – Objections to Christianity: Evil & Hell
  • Unit 6 – Practical Apologetic Evangelism
  • Forums
  • Reflection Journals
  • Research Assignments
  • Quizzes
  • Final Essay
  • Students complete all lessons and assignments
  • This is a two credit module, representing half a traditional course

 

Christian Studies: Exploring Science, Philosophy and Faith

Ever wondered about big foundational faith questions like “What is truth?” or “How do I know that God exists?” or “What’s the difference between Christianity, other religions,…

Ever wondered about big foundational faith questions like “What is truth?” or “How do I know that God exists?” or “What’s the difference between Christianity, other religions, and Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons?” or “Can naturalistic evolution account for the origin and diversity of life?” If so, you’re in the right place!

This course is an Apologetics introduction module that delves into some of these significant topics, Apologetics being a branch of theology that attempts to provide a rational defense for the truth claims of Christianity. In it, you can expect to learn more about how philosophers, scientists, and theologians throughout history and in our modern age have grappled with how faith aligns with experience and evidence.

Students are prompted throughout the course to also engage with their heart responses to these big questions, putting them side by side with the more intellectually-focused topics.

*Note: If you intend to take APOL1 and APOL2, we recommend doing these in numerical order, as they collectively build a ground-up case for the veracity of the Christian worldview. However, these modules can be done separately, and neither is a prerequisite for the other.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Unit 1 - What is Apologetics?
  • Unit 2 - Logic & Truth
  • Unit 3 - Worldviews & Religions
  • Unit 4 - Jehovah’s Witnesses & Mormonism
  • Unit 5 - The Existence of God
  • Unit 6 - Evolution
  • Forums
  • Reflection Journals
  • Research Assignments
  • Quizzes
  • Final Essay
  • Students complete all lessons and assignments
  • This is a two credit module, representing half a traditional course

Christian Studies: Getting to Know Paul

Imagine that you were offered a chance to go out for lunch with a man who had travelled the world, whose writing was part of the best-selling collection of books of all time, who…

Imagine that you were offered a chance to go out for lunch with a man who had travelled the world, whose writing was part of the best-selling collection of books of all time, who had been unjustly imprisoned on multiple occasions, had been severely beaten with whips by his own people five times, who had been shipwrecked, and who’d had angry mobs throw rocks at him until they thought he was dead. Would going for lunch with that person intrigue you? Do you think you might be able to hear some pretty amazing stories? 

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to go out for lunch with this man, because he’s dead. And he’s actually been dead for quite a while. However, many aspects of his life story have been written down, and many of his letters have been carefully preserved. The person, of course, is the Apostle Paul. 

In this module, you will have the opportunity to learn about Paul’s life, to study his letters, and hopefully be shaped and changed by them. There is even the possibility that Paul might help you to see God in a new way, or your faith in a new way, or even your purpose in life in a new way. Sure, you can’t have lunch with the guy, but keep reading. It might just be the next best thing.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

  • The module moves chronologically through Paul’s life. 

  • Students will read all passages about Paul in Acts, as well as all of Paul’s letters.

  • Response questions

  • Discussion forums 

  • Epistles Exploration Project

  • Students must complete all lessons and assignments

  • Each lesson designed to take approximately 60 minutes, with the final project taking 6-10 hours total

Christian Studies: Learning to Lead like Jesus

Do you remember what it was like the first time you had a chance to babysit your little brother or sister? Mom and dad put you in charge, and once they went out the door, you…

Do you remember what it was like the first time you had a chance to babysit your little brother or sister? Mom and dad put you in charge, and once they went out the door, you clenched your eleven year old fist and said something like this: “Mwa ha ha! The power! The absolute power!”

Leadership, though, is not about abusing your authority to compel somebody to do what you want them to do. If you want to be an effective leader, you’ll need a better method than brute force and fear. 

That’s where Jesus comes into the conversation. Leadership, he said, is not about lording it over people -- the ancient equivalent of being a big bully boss -- but about serving. It isn’t about getting to the top of the heap, it is about willingly helping people out who are at the bottom of the heap. It isn’t about sending other people out to sacrifice themselves for you, it was about sacrificing yourself for others. 

The “Learning to Lead Like Jesus” module will look closely at what Jesus taught about servant leadership and at how he modelled leadership during his life. Then, you will be given an opportunity to lead somewhere in your own community. Where can you lead? How can you serve? How can you make a difference in the world?

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Biblical leadership and Jesus’ servant leadership 

  • Contemporary leadership 

  • Where can you lead?

  • Various forums and short paragraph responses

  • Leadership Interview Assignment

  • Leadership Book Review

  • Leadership Practicum

Students must complete

all lessons and assignments

Each lesson is designed to

take approximately 60 minutes,

with the final practicum

assignment taking approximately

10 hours for field work and two hours of reflection and journaling time

  

 

Christian Studies: Walking With Those Who Have Gone Before

There’s a saying that not everything old is bad, and not everything new is good. This is definitely true for music, for visual works of art, for books, and for catch phrases…

There’s a saying that not everything old is bad, and not everything new is good. This is definitely true for music, for visual works of art, for books, and for catch phrases used by teenagers. Some new books are lit, but some old books are pretty groovy. Some books that are new you might think are the GOAT, but others are pretty lame, or if you grew up in the 90’s, gnarly or bogus. 

There are also books, some that are well over a thousand years old, that continue to be read and appreciated in spite of their age. Some authors, long after they have died, continue to speak to the church and impart their wisdom. Some more recent books have also come to be seen as classics, achieving wide readership and acceptance in many different church traditions.

In this module, you will have the opportunity to read two books that have been widely influential in the Christian faith and are considered to be classics. All of the book selections that have been chosen have had an impact on the way Christians understand and live out their faith in Jesus Christ. Choose wisely -- perhaps they will impact you too. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will select two books from a list of 15 Christian classics.

  • Reading journals (five per book)

  • Final reflection assignment

  • Students must read two books from a list of 15 Christian classics

  • Time requirements will vary depending on the books selected

  • The final reflection assignment should take between three to five hours.

Christian Studies: Wrestling with What's Right

In the darkest days of World War II, many people faced incredibly difficult moral choices. Some had to choose whether to risk the lives of their families in order to hide their…

In the darkest days of World War II, many people faced incredibly difficult moral choices. Some had to choose whether to risk the lives of their families in order to hide their Jewish neighbours. Others who had been taught to always tell the truth had to decide whether lying could be permissible if it kept someone safe from harm. Others, facing starvation, needed to determine whether stealing would be justifiable to stave off death through hunger. 

Choices like this are a test for anyone who has a desire to live a morally pure life. There are so many difficult questions to ask. How does a person decide what is right and wrong? Is it morally acceptable to do something that is wrong in order to prevent something else wrong from happening? Are there firm rules governing what is right and wrong, or are there simply principles to live by which need to be examined on a case-by-case basis? If someone believes in the centrality of scripture, how can the Bible be used to inform moral choices two or three thousand years after it was written? 

This module will give you an opportunity to learn some important skills for wrestling with what’s right. You will have an opportunity to exercise your moral muscles, so when the time comes and you are faced with your own ethical dilemmas in life you will be ready.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

  • OT Law-based ethics

  • Jesus’ ethics and the Sermon on the Mount

  • Paul’s virtue ethics

  • Secular ethical systems 

  • Ethics in other religious traditions

  • Finding your Ethical Center

  • Ethical scenarios

  • Contemporary Ethical Issues

  • Response questions

  • Discussion forums 

  • Ethical scenarios response activity

  • Contemporary Ethical Issue Project

  • Students must complete all lessons and

          assignments

  • Each lesson designed to take approximately

          60 minutes, with the final project taking 6-10 hours total

Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10

  IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO: • Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10 (4 credits) • Humanities 10 - Literary…

 

IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO:

• Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10 (4 credits)

• Humanities 10 - Literary Studies 10 (2 credits) 

• Humanities 10 – Composition 10 (2 credits)

Humanities 10 students also have the option to add 

• Humanities 10 - Leadership 10 (4 credits)

Humanities 10 is far more than just a 4 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. Although students receive full credit for four important graduation program courses, the integrated approach, which Humanities 10 employs, blends the literary and cultural developments of the times with enduring biblical reference points. The eight episode modules follow Canadian history from 1914 to the present and are best understood as a testimony to the promise and failure of progress and modernity - that is, the propensity of human beings to enlarge, expand, ascend, or otherwise prove one's personhood in moral and cultural space. 

Humanities 10 is not bounded by these dates. While journeying through periods of war and peace, fragmentation and reform it is hoped that students will engage an innovative framework that first considers the late modern basis for social order, and thereafter work through learning interventions that compel them to recover their 'voice' in view of 20th century developments that remain formative on human thought and practice today. 

Furthermore, the option to add Leadership 10, featuring a deep dive into the joy of Gospel Leadership, is an efficient way to build a high school graduation transcript attractive to both post-secondary employers and institutions of higher education. The possibilities are limitless with this multifaceted and multi-genre program.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Students who have finished Christian Studies 10 previously as a singular course can get credit for Humanities 11 - Christian Studies 11 as long as it is completed in conjunction with Humanities 10 - Literary Studies + Composition 10 and Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10.  

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Episode 1:  The Rise and Fall of Empires (1914 to 1919) 

  • Episode 2:  Boom and Bust (20s and 30s)

  • Episode 3:  Violence and Violation (40s and 50s)

  • Episode 4:  Aquarius and Angst (60s and 70s)

  • Episode 5:  Money as Meaning (the 1980s)

  • Episode 6:  New World Order (the 1990s)

  • Episode 7:  Digital Kids (the 2000s)

  • Episode 8:  The Liquid Modern Age (2010 - Present)

This is a synchronous hybrid multi-credit 8-episode program.

8 monthly Assignment Sets

Participation in Weekly Lectures and Tutorials 



 

Enthusiasm for robust biblical engagement with historical and literary themes. 
Students are required to download and complete or print assignments, scan
(either by taking pictures or physically scanning) and upload their assignments.
This course also requires attendance of LIVE biweekly lectures and tutorials
with the teaching team using ZOOM video. conferencing.  Humanities 10 is
est completed as a linear program starting in September but other special
arrangements can be made if necessary after consultation with the Hum10 teaching team.

Personalized Study: Bible, Apologetics and Theology

This Christian Studies module provides students with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the basic foundations of Christianity. Students may choose to look at a…

This Christian Studies module provides students with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the basic foundations of Christianity. Students may choose to look at a specific aspect of theology (looking at what a Christian believes), to deepen their understanding of apologetics (to consider why Christians believe what they do), or to perhaps explore a specific topic or book of the bible in a new way. This is a good fit for students who are looking to expand their understanding of what it means to be a Christian. 

Options for Study: Students should choose a resource and create a plan in consultation with their teacher to address a significant question or area of study relating to the Christian faith. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will collaborate with their teacher to decide on a topic of study. 

Possible topics may include: 

  • Study a book of the Bible

  • Study a character in the Bible

  • Study a Theme in the Bible

  • Learn about the main pillars or foundations of Christianity

  • Investigate an issue in culture from a Christian Perspective

    • Christianity and Social Media

    • Ethical issue

  • Learn about a different world religion and compare to Christianity

  • Christian Spirituality in Film

  • Youth Alpha Course

This will be determined based on what is appropriate for the student and topic, but may include things like: 

  • Book report/review

  • personal reflection, or journal

  • study questions, sermon notes

  • interview summary

  • graphic or visual representation of what was learned

  • Ted talk or oral presentation

  • Activity log plus a summary of activities/responsibilities

  • Final Assessment

  • Student reflection

Approximately 40 hours of study.

Personalized Study: Leadership and Service

This is an individualized course designed to allow students to explore and learn how to be the servants and models Christ called us to be. There is flexibility to allow…

This is an individualized course designed to allow students to explore and learn how to be the servants and models Christ called us to be. There is flexibility to allow students to explore their own gifts and to develop important skills necessary to be effective ambassadors for Christ. 

The focus is on students using their gifts and expanding their experiences in being the hands and feet of Jesus.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Part 1: Theory

 

- Students will be encouraged to dig into what it means to serve through the use of a specific resource.

 

Part 2: Practical

- Students will put into practice the leadership qualities they have learned about. During their experience they will also begin to explore their own leadership strengths and challenges. 

This will be determined based on what is appropriate for the student and topic, but may include things like: 

  • Book report/review

  • personal reflection, or journal

  • study questions, 

  • interview summary

  • Activity log plus a summary of activities/responsibilities

  • Final Assessment

  • Student reflection

Approximately 40 hours of work and/or study

Personalized Study: Spiritual Formation and Practice

This module is designed to encourage students to explore and deepen their own faith. Students will have the opportunity to focus on a specific area they would like to grow in,…

This module is designed to encourage students to explore and deepen their own faith. Students will have the opportunity to focus on a specific area they would like to grow in, or simply take the time to focus meaningfully on their own personal walk with God. Students will collaborate with the course teacher to create an individualzed plan, outline what resources will be used, and what work samples make sense and are appropriate for the topic for submission.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Part 1: Explore a topic or focus through time spent in study, investigation and interaction with others

Topic ideas: 

  • Prayer

  • Morality and integrity

  • Finances and stewardship

  • Baptism/profession of faith

  • Personal devotions

  • Discipleship

  • Fasting/Lent

  • Other Christian living topic 

  • Small group study

  • Youth retreat or class

  • A Specific Bible Study method (inductive, ARC method)

 

Part 2: Application - students will take what they learned and apply it in their own life in some manner.

This will be determined based on what is appropriate for the student and topic, but may include things like: 

  • Write a dialogue/script between you and God on a curious question, a prayer, a letter to a struggling friend

  • reflecting on each section or chapter of a book (what you learned or want to apply to life, etc)

  • Write your testimony or an experience where you shared your faith; 

  • reflect on and research questions you have about God

  • Do a report on spiritual gifts, a test you took, or on how you might use your gifts

  • Work a devotional or media series (RightNow Media) and reflect as you are led

  • Share a story, an outreach experience, an encounter with a non-believer or friend

  • Notes from a class, retreat or workshop

  • Keep a prayer journal to document your focus on prayer

  • Plan and carry out an idea for using your gifts

  • Think about how you can be a good steward of your resources (time, money, etc) and put that into practice (reflect on this with a journal, written testimony, etc)

  • Summary of a specific action item (for example, if your goal was to learn to share your faith, write about what happened when you actually did it!)

Approximately 40 hours of work and/or study

Composition 10

This self-paced online course guides students through Composition 10, which covers 2 of the 4 required ELA10 credits. This course is for students who will be pursuing the other 2…

This self-paced online course guides students through Composition 10, which covers 2 of the 4 required ELA10 credits. This course is for students who will be pursuing the other 2 credit ELA module through an individualized course or are coming to the school after having already completed 2 of the 4 ELA credits elsewhere. Students will develop their writing skills while exploring the power of literature and the nature of justice.

NOTE: This is not a 4-credit course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  1.  

    Major units include the following:

     

    -Reading and Writing Well

     

    -To Kill a Mockingbird

     

    -First Peoples 

     

    -Final Project: Variations on a Theme

     

    Scope & Sequence

  • Activation Criteria

     

    Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the course, providing students with opportunities to develop and demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways. 


    Major assignments include the following: Short Story Review Vlog, To Kill a Mockingbird Essay,  Multigenre Final Project

  • If you want to pursue all four ELA10 credits via the online route, please sign up for the Online Combo or Online Synchronous version of ELA: Composition 10. 

  •  

    Students are required to stream videos contained within the course content, as well as the ability to print and upload assignments.


  • Requires external resources: To Kill a Mockingbird and “Where the Borg Are” by Thomas King.

Composition 10

Individualized Composition 10 is for students who would like to strengthen their skills in expository, opinion, persuasive, descriptive and/or narrative writing.  NOTE: This is…

Individualized Composition 10 is for students who would like to strengthen their skills in expository, opinion, persuasive, descriptive and/or narrative writing. 

NOTE: This is not a 4-credit course.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  1.  

    This course provides students with the opportunity to explore and create coherent, purposeful compositions. Students will read and study compositions by other writers and consider their value as models for the development of students' own writing. They will develop their craft through processes of drafting, reflecting, and revising.

     

    There are many excellent curriculum options available to guide students through this course; suggestions will be provided by the teacher. 

     

  •  

    An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

     

    An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

     

    Students are invited to share an introductory autobiography or personal response to text of choice as their course activation assignment.

  • Two 2 credit ELA10 courses are required for graduation in BC. These can be combined or completed separately. 

Composition 10

This synchronous hybrid course specifically supports reluctant and/or developing writers in bringing their foundational composition skills up to grade-level. Jump In! (available in…

This synchronous hybrid course specifically supports reluctant and/or developing writers in bringing their foundational composition skills up to grade-level. Jump In! (available in paperback and digital formats) is the primary text. Weekly class meetings on Zoom provide additional guidance and interaction. Assignments are built upon personally selected topics of interest, allow opportunities for revision, and can be developed further for credit in New Media 10 or Spoken Language 10. Flexible workload options available for those on IEP.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  1.  

    Major units include the following:

     

    Expressing Your Opinion 

     

    Persuasive Argument 

     

    How-to Video Presentation

     

    News & Media Analysis 

     

    Research & Reporting

     

    Book/Movie Review 

  •  

    An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

     

    Course activation assignment is an introductory autobiography in form of choice. 

     

    Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the course, providing students with opportunities to develop and demonstrate their skills through a variety of forms;  no tests or exams.

     

  •  

    Semester 1 pacing only. Students must be prepared to start in September, invest approximately 3-4 hrs/week, continuing up to mid-January. 

     

    Students must be willing to use Zoom for participation in weekly class meetings

     

    Teacher will provide ordering instructions for required external resources: 

     

    Jump In: A Workbook for Reluctant & Eager Writers (available in paperback and digital formats) 

     

    Personally selected novel(s)

Composition 10

This synchronous hybrid course specifically supports reluctant and/or developing writers in bringing their foundational composition skills up to grade-level. Jump In! (available in…

This synchronous hybrid course specifically supports reluctant and/or developing writers in bringing their foundational composition skills up to grade-level. Jump In! (available in paperback and digital formats) is the primary text. Weekly class meetings on Zoom provide additional guidance and interaction. Assignments are built upon personally selected topics of interest, allow opportunities for revision, and can be developed further for credit in New Media 10 or Spoken Language 10. Flexible workload options available for those on IEP.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  1.  

    Major units include the following:

     

    Expressing Your Opinion 

     

    Persuasive Argument 

     

    How-to Video Presentation

     

    News & Media Analysis 

     

    Research & Reporting

     

    Book/Movie Review 

  •  

    An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

     

    Course activation assignment is an introductory autobiography in form of choice. 

     

    Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the course, providing students with opportunities to develop and demonstrate their skills through a variety of forms;  no tests or exams.

     

  •  

    Semester 1 pacing only. Students must be prepared to start in September, invest approximately 3-4 hrs/week, continuing up to mid-January. 

     

    Students must be willing to use Zoom for participation in weekly class meetings

     

    Teacher will provide ordering instructions for required external resources: 

     

    Jump In: A Workbook for Reluctant & Eager Writers (available in paperback and digital formats) 

     

    Personally selected novel(s)

Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 Combo Course

This synchronous online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together for a total of 4 credits. Students will develop their composition and literary analysis skills…

This synchronous online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together for a total of 4 credits. Students will develop their composition and literary analysis skills while exploring the power of literature and the nature of justice. Weekly class meetings on Zoom provide additional guidance, support, and interaction.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Major units include the following:

Reading and Writing Well

To Kill a Mockingbird

Choice between 

  • The Merchant of Venice

  • World War II Novel Study (various selections) 

First Peoples 

Final Project: Variations on a Theme

 


Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the

course, providing students with opportunities to develop and

demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways. 

Major assignments include the following: Theme Song Project,

To Kill a Mockingbird Essay, The Merchant of Venice Test &

Project or WWII Lit Circle Responses & Book Review, Reconciliation Project, Multigenre Final Project, Final Exam. 

Please sign up for the online synchronous course options for BOTH English Language Arts: Composition 10 AND English Language Arts: Literary Studies 10.

Linear pacing only. Students must be prepared to start in September,

invest approximately 3-4 hrs/week, continuing up to mid-June. 

 

Students are required to stream videos contained within the course

content, as well as the ability to print and upload assignments.


Requires external resources: To Kill a Mockingbird, World War II novel, and selected short stories.

 

Composition10 and Literary Studies 10 Combo Course

This self-paced online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together for a total of 4 credits. Students will develop their composition and literary analysis skills…

This self-paced online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together for a total of 4 credits. Students will develop their composition and literary analysis skills while exploring the power of literature and the nature of justice. Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

To Kill a Mockingbird

 

Choice between 

  • The Merchant of Venice

  • World War II Novel Study (various selections) 

 

First Peoples 

Final Project: Variations on a Theme

 

Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout

the course, providing students with opportunities to develop

and demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways. 

Major assignments include the following: Theme Song Project,

To Kill a Mockingbird Essay, The Merchant of Venice Test &

Project or WWII Lit Circle Responses & Book Review,

Reconciliation Project, Multigenre Final Project, Final Exam.

 

Please sign up for BOTH English Language Arts: Composition 10 (combo) AND English Language Arts: Literary Studies 10 (combo) courses. 

This online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together to meet the 4-credit requirement for grade 10 Language Arts. 

 

Creative Writing 10

Individualized Creative Writing 10 is for students interested in creative expression through language. Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements …

Individualized Creative Writing 10 is for students interested in creative expression through language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will have direct input into selection of major units and topics, allowing them to express themselves creatively, while developing their skills through writing and design processes. 
 

There are many excellent curriculum options available to guide students through this course; suggestions will be provided by the teacher.

An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

Students are invited to share an introductory autobiography or personal response to text of choice as their course activation assignment.

Two 2 credit ELA10 courses are required for graduation in BC. These can be combined or completed separately.

Creative Writing 10 & Literary Studies 10 Combo

This synchronous hybrid course uses Writing Fiction in High School  as a guide for developing foundational writing skills and literary understanding through fun, bite-sized…

This synchronous hybrid course uses Writing Fiction in High School  as a guide for developing foundational writing skills and literary understanding through fun, bite-sized creative writing exercises. Weekly class meetings on Zoom provide additional guidance and interaction. Assignments, submitted via Moodle website, allow opportunities for personal choice and revision. Flexible workload options available for those on IEP.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  1.  

    Major units include the following:

     

    Point of View 

     

    Characterization 

     

    Conflict 

     

    Dialogue

     

    Description

     

    Theme 

     

    Book/Movie Review (Essay Writing) 

     

    First Peoples Connection

     

    Storytelling/Movie Project


An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

 

Activation Assignments consist of an introductory autobiography & personal response to literary work. 

 

 

Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the course, providing students with opportunities to develop and demonstrate their skills through a variety of forms;  no tests or exams.

 

  •  

     

    Linear pacing only. Students must be prepared to start in September, invest approximately 3-4 hrs/week, continuing up to mid-June.

     

    Students must enrol in BOTH of the following to receive full all four credits for this course: 

     

    ELA10: Creative Writing (Hybrid Synchronous) 

     

    ELA10: Literary Studies (Hybrid Synchronous)

     

    Zoom Requirements? 

     

    Teacher will provide ordering instructions for required external resources: 

     

    Writing Fiction in High School 

     

    The Last Book in the Universe

     

    Personally selected novel(s) 

     

Humanities 10 - Composition 10

Humanities 10 is far more than just a 4 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. Although students receive full credit for four important graduation program courses, the integrated…

Humanities 10 is far more than just a 4 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. Although students receive full credit for four important graduation program courses, the integrated approach, which Humanities 10 employs, blends the literary and cultural developments of the times with enduring biblical reference points. The eight episode modules follow Canadian history from 1914 to the present and are best understood as a testimony to the promise and failure of progress and modernity - that is, the propensity of human beings to enlarge, expand, ascend, or otherwise prove one's personhood in moral and cultural space. 

Humanities 10 is not bounded by these dates. While journeying through periods of war and peace, fragmentation and reform it is hoped that students will engage an innovative framework that first considers the late modern basis for social order, and thereafter work through learning interventions that compel them to recover their 'voice' in view of 20th century developments that remain formative on human thought and practice today. 

Furthermore, the option to add Leadership 10, featuring a deep dive into the joy of Gospel Leadership, is an efficient way to build a high school graduation transcript attractive to both post-secondary employers and institutions of higher education. The possibilities are limitless with this multifaceted and multi-genre program.

If you are selecting this course, also select the courses below to ensure you are enrolled in all the necessary courses:

  • Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10 (4 credits)
  • Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10 (4 credits) 
  • Humanities 10 – Literary Studies 10 (2 credits)

Humanities 10 students also have the option to add 

  • Humanities 10 - Leadership 10 (4 credits)
Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Episode 1:  The Rise and Fall of Empires (1914 to 1919) 
  • Episode 2:  Boom and Bust (20s and 30s)
  • Episode 3:  Violence and Violation (40s and 50s)
  • Episode 4:  Aquarius and Angst (60s and 70s)
  • Episode 5:  Money as Meaning (the 1980s)
  • Episode 6:  New World Order (the 1990s)
  • Episode 7:  Digital Kids (the 2000s)
  • Episode 8:  The Liquid Modern Age (2010 - Present)
  • This is a synchronous hybrid multi-credit 8-episode program.
  • 8 monthly Assignment Sets
  • Participation in Weekly Lectures and Tutorials 


 
  • Enthusiasm for robust biblical engagement with historical and literary themes.
  • Students are required to download and complete or print assignments, scan (either by taking pictures or physically scanning) and upload their assignments.
  • This course also requires attendance of LIVE biweekly lectures and tutorials with the teaching team using ZOOM video conferencing. 
  • Humanities 10 is best completed as a linear program starting in September but other special arrangements can be made if necessary after consultation with the Hum10 teaching team.

Humanities 10 - Literary Studies 10

    IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO: • Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10 (4 credits) • Humanities 10 - Christian…

 

 

IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO:

• Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10 (4 credits)

• Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10 (4 credits) 

• Humanities 10 – Composition 10 (2 credits)

Humanities 10 students also have the option to add 

• Humanities 10 - Leadership 10 (4 credits)

Humanities 10 is far more than just a 4 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. Although students receive full credit for four important graduation program courses, the integrated approach, which Humanities 10 employs, blends the literary and cultural developments of the times with enduring biblical reference points. The eight episode modules follow Canadian history from 1914 to the present and are best understood as a testimony to the promise and failure of progress and modernity - that is, the propensity of human beings to enlarge, expand, ascend, or otherwise prove one's personhood in moral and cultural space. 

Humanities 10 is not bounded by these dates. While journeying through periods of war and peace, fragmentation and reform it is hoped that students will engage an innovative framework that first considers the late modern basis for social order, and thereafter work through learning interventions that compel them to recover their 'voice' in view of 20th century developments that remain formative on human thought and practice today. 

Furthermore, the option to add Leadership 10, featuring a deep dive into the joy of Gospel Leadership, is an efficient way to build a high school graduation transcript attractive to both post-secondary employers and institutions of higher education. The possibilities are limitless with this multifaceted and multi-genre program.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Episode 1:  The Rise and Fall of Empires (1914 to 1919) 

  • Episode 2:  Boom and Bust (20s and 30s)

  • Episode 3:  Violence and Violation (40s and 50s)

  • Episode 4:  Aquarius and Angst (60s and 70s)

  • Episode 5:  Money as Meaning (the 1980s)

  • Episode 6:  New World Order (the 1990s)

  • Episode 7:  Digital Kids (the 2000s)

  • Episode 8:  The Liquid Modern Age (2010 - Present)

This is a synchronous hybrid multi-credit 8-episode program.

8 monthly Assignment Sets

Participation in Weekly Lectures and Tutorials 



 

Enthusiasm for robust biblical engagement with historical and literary themes. 
Students are required to download and complete or print assignments, scan
(either by taking pictures or physically scanning) and upload their assignments.
This course also requires attendance of LIVE biweekly lectures and tutorials
with the teaching team using ZOOM video. conferencing.  Humanities 10 is
best completed as a linear program starting in September but other special
arrangements can be made if necessary after consultation with the Hum10 teaching team.

Literary Studies 10

This synchronous online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together for a total of 4 credits. Students will develop their composition and literary analysis skills…

This synchronous online course blends Composition 10 and Literary Studies 10 together for a total of 4 credits. Students will develop their composition and literary analysis skills while exploring the power of literature and the nature of justice. Weekly class meetings on Zoom provide additional guidance, support, and interaction.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Major units include the following:

Reading and Writing Well

To Kill a Mockingbird

Choice between:

  • The Merchant of Venice

  • World War II Novel Study (various selections) 

First Peoples 

Final Project: Variations on a Theme


Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the course, providing students with opportunities to develop and demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways. 

Major assignments include the following: Theme Song Project, To Kill a Mockingbird Essay, The Merchant of Venice Test & Project or WWII Lit Circle Responses & Book Review, Reconciliation Project, Multigenre Final Project, Final Exam. 

Students enrolling in this particular course must also enrol in ELA: Composition 10 (Online Synchronous).

Linear pacing only. Students must be prepared to start in September, invest approximately 3-4 hrs/week, continuing up to mid-June. 

 

Students are required to stream videos contained within the course content, as well as the ability to print and upload assignments.

Requires external resources: To Kill a Mockingbird, World War II novel, and selected short stories.

 

Literary Studies 10

This self-paced online course guides students through Literary Studies 10, which covers 2 of the 4 required ELA10 credits. This course is for students who will be pursuing the…

This self-paced online course guides students through Literary Studies 10, which covers 2 of the 4 required ELA10 credits. This course is for students who will be pursuing the other 2 credit ELA module through an individualized course or are coming to the school after having already completed 2 of the 4 ELA credits elsewhere.Students will develop their literary analysis skills while exploring the power of words and the nature of justice.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Major units include the following:

-Reading and Writing Well

 

-To Kill a Mockingbird

 

Choice between:

 

  • The Merchant of Venice

 

  • World War II Novel Study (various selections) 

 

-First Peoples

 

Formative and summative assignments are woven throughout the course, providing students with opportunities to develop and demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways. 


Major assignments include the following: Theme Song Project, To Kill a Mockingbird Essay, The Merchant of Venice Test & Project or WWII Lit Circle Responses & Book Review, Reconciliation Project.

If you want to pursue all four ELA10 credits via the online route, please sign up for the Online Combo or Online Synchronous version of ELA:Literary Studies 10. 

Students are required to stream videos contained within the course content, as well as the ability to print and upload assignments.

Requires external resources: To Kill a Mockingbird, World War II novel, and selected short stories.

 

Literary Studies 10

Individualized Literary Studies 10 is for students interested in a particular form, genre, theme, era, geographical area, or in the study of literature in general. Major…

Individualized Literary Studies 10 is for students interested in a particular form, genre, theme, era, geographical area, or in the study of literature in general.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will have direct input into selection of major units and topics, allowing them to follow their passion and at the same time:

• increase literacy skills through close reading of appropriately challenging texts

 

• develop balance and broaden their understanding of themselves and the world

 

• develop higher-level thinking and learning skills

There are many excellent curriculum options available to guide students through this course; suggestions will be provided by the teacher.

 


An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

Students are invited to share an introductory autobiography or personal response to text of choice as their course activation assignment.

Two 2 credit ELA10 courses are required for graduation in BC. These can be combined or completed separately.

New Media 10

Individualized New Media 10 is for students interested in media, journalism, film, or digital communications.  Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements …

Individualized New Media 10 is for students interested in media, journalism, film, or digital communications. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Students will have direct input into selection of major units and topics, resulting in a program of study centred on personal interests, needs, and abilities, while at the same time allowing for a range of local delivery methods. New Media 10 recognizes that digital literacy is an essential characteristic of the educated citizen. 

There are a variety of resource options available to guide students through this course; suggestions will be provided by the teacher. 

 


An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course.

Students are invited to share an introductory autobiography or personal response to text of choice as their course activation assignment.

Two 2 credit ELA10 courses are required for graduation in BC. These can be combined or completed separately.

Spoken Language 10

Individualized Spoken Language 10 is for students interested in performance, storytelling, spoken word poetry, or public speaking. Major Units and Topics Assessment …

Individualized Spoken Language 10 is for students interested in performance, storytelling, spoken word poetry, or public speaking.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop their spoken communication skills through processes of questioning, exploring, and sampling. Students will also study, draft, and use language to create original pieces in a variety of modes. 

This course would be a great fit for students involved in community theatre, storytelling, spoken word, Toastmasters, 4H or Cadets Effective Speaking programs. 

There are a couple great curriculum options suited to guiding students through this course at home; suggestions will be provided by the teacher.

 


An individualized student learning plan will be created to facilitate personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

An online Moodle website will serve as a tool to support students in tracking their progress for this course. 

Students are invited to share an introductory autobiography or personal response to text of choice as their course activation assignment.

Two 2 credit ELA10 courses are required for graduation in BC. These can be combined or completed separately.

Foundations of Math and PreCalculus 10

Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10 is designed to help students develop the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills required to continue their studies in math.…

Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10 is designed to help students develop the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills required to continue their studies in math. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, projects, interactive applets and more.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Exponents

Polynomials

Functions & Relations

Linear Relations

Systems of Equations

Trigonometry

Financial Literacy

Fill in the blank notes packages and practice questions (with detailed solutions)

Unit assignments completed to mastery 

Chapter tests

Projects in Systems of Equations, Trigonometry, and Financial Literacy


Scientific Calculator (graphing calculator optional, but not required)

Access to a printer is recommended to print assignments and note packages.

 

Ability to scan assignments (scanner or scanning app)

 

Foundations of Math and PreCalculus 10

Synchronous Foundations of Math and PreCalculus 10 satisfies the math 10 graduation requirement (math 11 is also required) and helps to prepares for Pre-Calculus 11 or Foundation…

Synchronous Foundations of Math and PreCalculus 10 satisfies the math 10 graduation requirement (math 11 is also required) and helps to prepares for Pre-Calculus 11 or Foundation of Math 11.  Students learn a variety of Algebra concepts and are introduced to trigonometry. This course begins in September and has weekly Zoom classes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Linear Relations

-       Equations of a line

-       Slope

-       Graphing lines

Linear Systems

-       Intersection point of 2 lines

-       Algebraic and Graphical solution

Polynomials

-       Multiplication of binomials

-       Factoring of trinomials

Exponents and Prime Numbers

-       Exponent laws

-       Prime number factorization

-       Greatest Common Factor

-       Least Common Multiple

Functions and Relations

-       Definition of a function

-       Function notation

-       Domain and range or functions

Trigonometry of Right Triangles

-       Primary trigonometric ratios

-       Pythagorean Theorem

Financial Literacy

-       Income tax

-       Types of income


Each student will watch the video lessons, complete notes based on the videos and practice questions.  Students will then have the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of concepts through assignments before writing a chapter test.

This course has 3 projects where students use enquiry based learning to deepen understanding.

The course ends with a final exam

Students will need access to a computer (with internet, speakers, mic and camera), printer, pencil, papers and a scientific calculator.   A graphing calculator is also permitted but not required.

Foundations of Math and PreCalculus 10

Individualized/Hybrid FPC math 10 satisfies the math 10 graduation requirement (math 11 is also required) and helps to prepares for Pre-Calculus 11 or Foundation of Math 11. …

Individualized/Hybrid FPC math 10 satisfies the math 10 graduation requirement (math 11 is also required) and helps to prepares for Pre-Calculus 11 or Foundation of Math 11.  Students learn a variety of Algebra concepts and are introduced to trigonometry. Students are able to select from a variety of textbooks to learn the major topics in the course. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Linear Relations

-       Equations of a line

-       Slope

-       Graphing lines

Linear Systems

-       Intersection point of 2 lines

-       Algebraic and Graphical solution

Polynomials

-       Multiplication of binomials

-       Factoring of trinomials

Exponents and Prime Numbers

-       Exponent laws

-       Prime number factorization

-       Greatest Common Factor

-       Least Common Multiple

Functions and Relations

-       Definition of a function

-       Function notation

-       Domain and range or functions

Trigonometry of Right Triangles

-       Primary trigonometric ratios

-       Pythagorean Theorem

Financial Literacy

-       Income tax

-       Types of income

Each student submits work from their textbooks.  They also complete 6 topic quizzes, 2 projects,3 mini-assignments and a course review quiz.

There are many textbook options and include:

-       Foundation and Pre-Calculus Math 10 by Pearson

-       Mathematics 10 BC Edition by Dynamic Classroom

-       Theories and Problems for Foundation and Pre-Calculus Math 10 by Crescent Beach Publication

It is also possible to use American books like Saxon, Teaching Textbook and Math-U-See.  In general students using an American book should start FPC math 10 at the midpoint of Algebra 1. Typically they will complete Algebra 1 and then start Algebra 2.

 Other textbooks may also work for this course.  Please consult the course teacher to discuss other options.

Workplace Mathematics 10

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on,…

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on, real-life, applicable math content and helps develop skills through project-based learning. This online version of the course uses StudyForge where students complete lessons by watching videos and then completing online practice questions. Prior knowledge needed to be successful in this course: how to use all aspects of BEDMAS, how to plot on an x and y axis, knowledge of shapes, and simple algebra.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Graphing - Bar graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, infographics, pictographs
  • Conversions - mL to gallon, mile to meter, mm to cm, in to ft, etc. 
  • Surface Area and Volume - For prisms, cylinders, and pyramids
  • Trigonometry - Sin, Cos and Tan for right angle triangles only
  • Central Tendency - Mean, median, mode, range, outliers
  • Probability - Games, dice, cards
  • Financial Literacy - Different types of income and different ways to earn income

  • Students learn the course content via the Lessons and these are marked for a “completion” grade. 
  • Assignments are used as indicators to see if students are ready for the tests. 
  • Tests are completed online to check understanding of the content and to gauge Math skills. 
  • There are also 3 projects that allow students a chance to try out their Math skills in a meaningful way.
  • Laptop/computer
  • Google Chrome web browser (not a Requirement but a STRONG suggestion)
  • Printer
  • Scanner (you can use your smart phone if you don’t have a scanner)
  • Ruler

Workplace Mathematics 10

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on,…

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on, real-life, applicable math content and helps develop skills through project-based learning. This hybrid version of the course will utilize a workbook to teach the concepts but will also have a moodle page where students will complete a chapter challenge based on what they learned and it is also where the projects for the course will be. Prior knowledge needed to be successful in this course: how to use all aspects of BEDMAS, how to plot on an x and y axis, knowledge of shapes, and simple algebra.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Graphing - Bar graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, infographics, pictographs
  • Measurement and Conversions - mL to gallon, mile to meter, mm to cm, in to ft, etc. 
  • Surface Area and Volume - For prisms, cylinders, and pyramids
  • Trigonometry - Sin, Cos and Tan for right angle triangles only
  • Central Tendency - Mean, median, mode, range, outliers
  • Probability - Games, dice, cards
  • Financial Literacy - Different types of income and different ways to earn income

  • Chapter Challenges based on the chapters in the Mathworks work books. 
  • Projects that were designed specifically for homeschool learners
  • Mathworks 10
  • Mathworks 11 - UBC Pacific Press
  • Laptop/computer
  • Scanner/Smartphone
  • Calculator
  • Ruler
  • Deck of cards
  • Dice

Workplace Mathematics 10

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on,…

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on, real-life, applicable math content and helps develop skills through project-based learning. Prior knowledge needed to be successful in this course: how to use all aspects of BEDMAS, how to plot on an x and y axis, knowledge of shapes, and simple algebra.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


  • Graphing - Bar graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, infographics, pictographs
  • Measurement and Conversions - mL to gallon, mile to meter, mm to cm, in to ft, etc. 
  • Surface Area and Volume - For prisms, cylinders, and pyramids
  • Trigonometry - Sin, Cos and Tan for right angle triangles only
  • Central Tendency - Mean, median, mode, range, outliers
  • Probability - Games, dice, cards
  • Financial Literacy - Different types of income and different ways to earn income

  • This is an individualized course, a student learning plan will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student.
  • Laptop/computer
  • Scanner/Smartphone
  • Calculator
  • Ruler

Workplace Mathematics 10

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on,…

This Math is geared towards students that aren’t heading into high academics in post-secondary (Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, Computer Programming). It teaches hands-on, real-life, applicable math content and helps develop skills through project-based learning. This online version of the course uses StudyForge where students complete lessons by watching videos and then completing online practice questions. Prior knowledge needed to be successful in this course: how to use all aspects of BEDMAS, how to plot on an x and y axis, knowledge of shapes, and simple algebra.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Graphing - Bar graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, infographics, pictographs
  • Conversions - mL to gallon, mile to meter, mm to cm, in to ft, etc. 
  • Surface Area and Volume - For prisms, cylinders, and pyramids
  • Trigonometry - Sin Cos and Tan for right angle triangles only
  • Central Tendency - Mean, median, mode, range, outliers
  • Probability - Games, dice, cards
  • Financial Literacy - Different types of income and different ways to earn income

  • Students learn the course content via the Lessons and these are marked for a “completion” grade. 
  • Assignments are used as indicators to see if students are ready for the tests. 
  • Tests are completed online to check understanding of the content and to gauge Math skills. 
  • There are also 3 projects that allow students a chance to try out their Math skills in a meaningful way.
  • Laptop/computer
  • Google Chrome web browser (not a Requirement but a STRONG suggestion)
  • Printer
  • Scanner (you can use your smart phone if you don’t have a scanner)
  • Ruler

Adventure Discipleship - Fall Program

The Adventure Discipleship Program is a unique opportunity for adventurers at heart - an opportunity to explore and be encouraged to grow your passion for Christ within the context…

The Adventure Discipleship Program is a unique opportunity for adventurers at heart - an opportunity to explore and be encouraged to grow your passion for Christ within the context of exploring outdoor adventure. In the program, students will be engaged in discipleship, build leadership skills and learn practical outdoor recreational skills while earning high school credits. The program builds toward a multi-day group expedition in the natural beauty of God’s Creation, with locations ranging from the mountains (Fall program), to a week long coastal backpacking trip (Spring program). Students will also be encouraged to gain industry level certification in outdoor skill areas of choice.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Graduation Program courses:

    • Physical Health and Education (or Outdoor Education 11/ 12)- 4 credits - mostly practical application.

  • Electives:

    • Christian Studies- 4 credits

    • Leadership - 4 credits - with specific focus on outdoor leadership

Successful completion of the program will grant students 12 credits.

Assessment is covered through a variety of approaches, from online readings and assignments, PE logs and training routines, as well as assessment around the week long backpacking trip.

Please note that students must fill out an application and be accepted into the program to be signed up for Adventure Discipleship courses. Please contact James Nelson for information, or to request an application packet: jnelson@onlineschool.ca

Adventure Discipleship - Spring Program

The Adventure Discipleship Program is a unique opportunity for adventurers at heart - an opportunity to explore and be encouraged to grow your passion for Christ within the context…

The Adventure Discipleship Program is a unique opportunity for adventurers at heart - an opportunity to explore and be encouraged to grow your passion for Christ within the context of exploring outdoor adventure. In the program, students will be engaged in discipleship, build leadership skills and learn practical outdoor recreational skills while earning high school credits. The program builds toward a multi-day group expedition in the natural beauty of God’s Creation, with locations ranging from the mountains (Fall program), to a week long coastal backpacking trip (Spring program). Students will also be encouraged to gain industry level certification in outdoor skill areas of choice.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Graduation Program courses:

    • Physical Health and Education (or Outdoor Education 11/ 12)- 4 credits - mostly practical application.

  • Electives:

    • Christian Studies- 4 credits

    • Leadership - 4 credits - with specific focus on outdoor leadership

Successful completion of the program will grant students 12 credits.

Assessment is covered through a variety of approaches, from online readings and assignments, PE logs and training routines, as well as assessment around the week long backpacking trip.

Please note that students must fill out an application and be accepted into the program to be signed up for Adventure Discipleship courses. Please contact James Nelson for information, or to request an application packet: jnelson@onlineschool.ca

Physical and Health Education 10

PHE10 is a four-credit course that fulfills the Grade 10 PHE requirements for graduation with a B.C. Dogwood Diploma. Major Units and Topics Assessment …

PHE10 is a four-credit course that fulfills the Grade 10 PHE requirements for graduation with a B.C. Dogwood Diploma.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Physical literacy

Healthy and active living

Social and community health

Mental well-being

*All assignments are found at the course in Moodle

 

6-8 Completed Sports Logs of Activity

3 Fitness Tests

Written Assignments

Working computer with Internet required. 

Equipment and clothing required for a variety of sporting activities

 

Home and community resources where activities may be completed

 

Physical and Health Education 10

PHE10 is a four-credit course that fulfills the Grade 10 PHE requirements for graduation with a B.C. Dogwood Diploma. Major Units and Topics Assessment …

PHE10 is a four-credit course that fulfills the Grade 10 PHE requirements for graduation with a B.C. Dogwood Diploma.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Physical literacy

Healthy and active living

Social and community health

Mental well-being

*All assignments are found at the course in Moodle

 


6-8 Completed Sports Logs of Activity

3 Fitness Tests

5 Written Assignments (Intro, Goal Setting, Nutrition, Gratitude Journal and Safety Asn) 

As this is an Individualized course, a Student Learning Plan (SLP) will be created for personalized learning and so students will have a lot of choice in completing a variety of physical and written activities that line up with the course outcomes.


Working computer with Internet required. 

Equipment and clothing required for a variety of sporting activities

 

Home and community resources where activities may be completed

 

Science 10

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in BC. There are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging…

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in BC. There are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, lab experiences, projects interactive applets and more. 

A strong background in the Chemistry concepts taught in Science 9 is required.

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Biology

  • DNA is the basis for the diversity of living things. 

Earth Science

 

  • The formation of the universe can be explained using the big bang theory. 

Physics

  • Energy is conserved, and its transformation can affect living things and the environment. 

Chemistry

  • Energy change is required as atoms rearrange in chemical processes.

There are a number of projects throughout the Science 10 course.

Biology: 

  • Art of Reasoning paper

  • Local Concern Action Plan presentation

Earth Science: 

  • Big Bang Timeline

  • 3D Space Technology model

Physics: 

  • Kinetic and Potential Energy model/lab

  • Energy A-Z Page

  • Dental Hygiene

Chemistry: 

  • Lab: Effect of temperature and presence of a catalyst on the rate of reaction.

Student will require a few resources for lab
activities such as balloons, hydrogen
peroxide, chalk, Alka Seltzer tablets.
Most of the required resources can be
found within regular grocery or pharmacy
stores. 

Access to a printer is necessary in order to
print off the video lesson notes. This will be about 100 single sided pages of black and white printing.

 

Science 10

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in B.C. It covers topics in four streams of science: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy. Major Units and Topics …

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in B.C. It covers topics in four streams of science: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

DNA is the basis for all living things 

Energy Change, atomic rearrangement and chemical processes

Energy is conserved, and its transformation can affect living things and the environment

The formation of the universe can be explained by the Big Bang Theory

Each unit has various options for chapter assignments that serve a variety of types of learners (ie. model building, worksheets, videos, etcs.) 

There are a number of lab experiments to choose from, with a requirement that 3 are completed 

Each unit ends with the option to do a unit test or an inquiry project

Final exam once all coursework is completed

BC Science Connections 10 Textbook 

Most experiment materials can be commonly found in the household

Science 10

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in B.C. It covers topics in four streams of science: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy. Major Units and Topics …

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in B.C. It covers topics in four streams of science: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

DNA is the basis for all living things 

Energy Change, atomic rearrangement and chemical processes

Energy is conserved, and its transformation can affect living things and the environment

The formation of the universe can be explained by the Big Bang Theory

This is an individualized course, a student learning plan
will be created for personalized learning for each student. As such, the assessment methods will be created in conjunction with the goals of the student. 

Activation criteria will be determined in the creation of an SLP.

 

Resources and textbooks will be determined with the student

Science 10

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in BC. There are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging…

Science 10 is a required course for graduation in BC. There are four major units of study, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Science. The course is designed to be an engaging online learning experience for students which includes videos, readings, lab experiences, projects interactive applets and more. 

A strong background in the Chemistry concepts taught in Science 9 is required.

This course offers a weekly live class meeting where upcoming assignments are discussed and student questions are addressed. Students choose a linear or Semester 1 pacing. Weekly meetings are recorded and available for viewing if students miss the weekly meeting. 

Students are made aware of the pacing needed to stay on track; however, it is up to the parent and student to monitor pacing. 

Sample Lesson

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Biology

  • DNA is the basis for the diversity of living things. 

Earth Science

 

  • The formation of the universe can be explained using the big bang theory. 

Physics

  • Energy is conserved, and its transformation can affect living things and the environment. 

Chemistry

  • Energy change is required as atoms rearrange in chemical processes.

There are a number of projects throughout the Science 10 course.

Biology: 

  • Art of Reasoning paper

  • Local Concern Action Plan presentation

Earth Science: 

  • Big Bang Timeline

  • 3D Space Technology model

Physics: 

  • Kinetic and Potential Energy model/lab

  • Energy A-Z Page

  • Dental Hygiene

Chemistry: 

  • Lab: Effect of temperature and presence of a catalyst on the rate of reaction.

Student will require a few resources for lab
activities such as balloons, hydrogen
peroxide, chalk, Alka Seltzer tablets.
Most of the required resources can be
found within regular grocery or pharmacy
stores. 

Access to a printer is necessary in order to
print off the video lesson notes. This will be about 100 single sided pages of black and white printing.

 

American Sign Language 10

American Sign Language is a beginner ASL course intended to introduce the student to signing.  Signing is a useful skill that can open up for you a world of understanding and…

American Sign Language is a beginner ASL course intended to introduce the student to signing.  Signing is a useful skill that can open up for you a world of understanding and interacting with a new group of people.  This is an individualized course that has endless possibilities to fulfill the course requirements but there is a moodle course set up designed to guide and teach the students sign language through an online video series, which is a communication-focused curriculum- Lifeprint,com.  ASL is a language expressed through the hands and face. ASL is more than learning a language and memorizing signs. It has its own grammar, culture, history, terminology and other unique characteristics. ASL 10 is an introduction to the culture and grammar of this language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
Topics include: basic vocabulary, grammar, history, fingerspelling, numbers, terminology, and Deaf culture. 

Assignments:  There are a variety of assignments in this course: computer-marking quizzes, and logging of hours. There are also several creative assignments such as learning to sign your story, and looking at a variety of autobiographies as well as topics of interest within the deaf culture.

There are generally choices given in every assignment so you can choose what suits you best.

 

American Sign Language 10

American Sign Language 10 is a comprehensive ASL course that is intended for begnners as well as for those with previous ASL experience. This course will help you to reach a…

American Sign Language 10 is a comprehensive ASL course that is intended for begnners as well as for those with previous ASL experience. This course will help you to reach a comfortable conversational level of ASL. You will learn essential vocabulary and phrases, become competent in proper ASL grammar, and be introduced to the vibrant Deaf culture. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

- Ongoing vocabulary, phrases, and conversation practice

- Deaf culture and history

- Fingerspelling

- Numbers

- The Five Sign Parameters

- Word Order

- Sentence Types

- Pronouns and Indexing

- Directional Verbs

- Negation

- Identifying People

Quizzes

Reading Comprehension Assignments

Writing Assignments

Video/audio Recordings 

Final Exam.

 

Computer with internet access

 

Webcam/video camera or other

means of self recording visual signing. 

Core French 10

This course is for students who have taken several years of Core French and wish to continue their study.  For this course students will develop their reading, writing, listening…

This course is for students who have taken several years of Core French and wish to continue their study.  For this course students will develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Students will work with a French speaker in their community and/or work with their teacher on a regular basis online. Reflection is also an important part of learning a language.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Speaking: Practising and
recording conversations on
a variety of topics. Presenting
on topics of interest.

Reading: Students will read
French stories and articles and
demonstrate understanding.  

Writing: Students will write a
variety of pieces, stories,
descriptions etc. on provided
topics and topics of interest. 

Learning about francophone
communities in Canada and
reflecting on language learning

Specific competencies include:

  • various types of questions

  • sequences of events

  • degrees of likes and dislikes

  • hopes, dreams, desires, and ambitions

  • opinions about familiar topics

  • An initial assignment is
    provided upon enrollment
    and must be completed in order
    to become active in the course

  • Zoom sessions with teacher

  • Recorded conversations

  • Recorded presentations

  • Writing projects

  • Reading comprehension questions

  • Previous exposure to French

  • A French speaking tutor, parent
    or other member of the community
    to practice
    speaking with and/or a
    commitment to meet regularly
    with teacher over zoom

Core French 10 - Rosetta Stone Foundations

Designed for the intermediate French student in Grade 10-12 as a continuation of French Level E (prerequisite: French Level E). Students will do interactive lessons through the…

Designed for the intermediate French student in Grade 10-12 as a continuation of French Level E (prerequisite: French Level E). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 11 and 12)

  • 1 activation project (2 parts)

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS (Note these sessions close August 31/20)

  • Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 3 and 4) 

  • 30 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with Internet 

Required

 

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

 

USB Headset with microphone

 

Core French 10 - Rosetta Stone Foundations

Designed for the intermediate French student in Grade 10-12 as a continuation of French Level E (prerequisite: French Level E). Students will do interactive lessons through the…

Designed for the intermediate French student in Grade 10-12 as a continuation of French Level E (prerequisite: French Level E). Students will do interactive lessons through the Rosetta Stone Foundations website and complete some cultural assignments in Moodle.

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 60 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 11 and 12)

  • 1 activation project (2 parts)

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • 3 video conversation meetings with teacher

  • 8 live tutoring sessions through RS (Note these sessions close August 31/20)

  • Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 3 and 4) 

  • 30 hours Extended Learning in RS


Working computer with Internet 

Required

 

Rosetta Stone Foundations 

 

 

USB Headset with microphone

 

German 10

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of: Language Training, Reading Comprehension, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects. 1.Language Training…

The Rosetta Stone Foundations program is comprised of:

Language Training, Reading Comprehension, LiveTutoring, Meetings with your Teacher, and Projects.

1.Language Training teaches a second language the same way you learned your first language: by pairing words to images, easily and naturally. RosettaStone mimics this process, using rich visual imagery to help learners think in a new language and to perfect pronunciation.

2. Reading activities help cement the learners’ understanding by engaging in a wide range of activities designed to sharpen language skills.

3. Live Tutoring allows for interaction with other learners and builds confidence in an online, real-time interactive environment. By joining sessions of Live Tutoring, you practice and refine your conversational skills.

4. Meeting with your teacher provides another opportunity for you to refine your conversational skills, ask questions, and reinforce what you are learning in the RSF program.

5. Term Projects: Culture and Christian Worldview projects are also required.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Unit 11: Everyday
things: Belief and
opinion; taking things
along; Measurement and
fractions; in the kitchen

Unit 12: Places and
Events: Politics and
media; Languages and
business; learning and
memory; Celebrating
holidays

Language training activities
30%
Homework (Extended
Activities) 20%
Live Tutoring 15%
Live sessions with teacher
10%
Projects 25%

3 years of German Instruction

Computer and USB headset

German 10

Designed for the beginning German student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a German 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will…

Designed for the beginning German student (no prerequisite), this course prepares students to enter a German 11 course. Students in collaboration with parent and teacher will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources that include grammar, culture, conversation, reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Cognates

German phonemes

German declination

Common, high-frequency
vocabulary, sentence structures, and expressions

First People’s perspectives

German cultural festivals

German communities in
Canada

German works of art


Activation Project 

An online language program

Monthly conversation meetings with teacher

Min. 12 cultural writing samples

Cultural activities - German 
food, books, movies, music

A Grammar workbook

Working computer with Internet required. 

Headset with microphone may be needed.

Purchase of textbook/workbook.

Mandarin 10

Mandarin 10 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 11 and 12, level 3) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story reading and…

Mandarin 10 uses the Rosetta Stone program (units 11 and 12, level 3) that consists of language lessons (speaking, listening, pronunciation, writing, review), story reading and live tutorials as well as cultural and FFPOL projects. Students are immersed in the world of Mandarin Chinese language and have the choice of completing the course in Pin Yin, simplified and traditional Chinese. Projects include the activation project which reflect cultural comparisons, First Peoples perspectives, social and cultural activities and an interview with a native Mandarin speaker.

Please note - this is NOT an introductory Mandarin course. Students must have grade 9 Mandarin or equivalent experience speaking and reading Mandarin (Pin Yin) but are not required to write in Chinese characters. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

 

Unit 11 Everyday things: 

Activation project, present perfect, adjectives and nouns formed with verbs, contrast words: “correct,” “appropriate” and “if... not” phrases, conditional situations, gerunds, shopping containers “only” and “never”, subjunctive mood, syllables stress, food shapes fractions, units of measure, household and food items, units of measuring accurately

Creative Works Project

Unit 12 Places and events:

 Politics nationalities heads of state, news sources, political terms, future tense, geographic names, passive voice, business vocabulary, quantifiers, memory, learning, adjectival forms of the cardinal directions, “too much/too many”, “since”, “okay”, “ever/never” and “again”, adverbs, degree, quantity, celebrations, festivals, religious holidays, modal auxiliary verbs, frequency

 

Interview Project

 

 

Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their pronunciation, matching pictures to the correct phrases, writing, comprehension, games activities and listening skills. Criterion and the rubric for the activation and creative works project are found in the Moodle course.

Note: Prior to enrolling in Mandarin 10, students should have a functional skill set of conversational Mandarin as well as the ability to read Pin Yin and applications of the four tones in Mandarin speaking. Note: Prior to enrolling in Mandarin 10, students should have a functional skill set of conversational Mandarin as well as the ability to read Pin Yin and applications of the four tones in Mandarin speaking. 

 

Unit 11: Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the activation project and creative works project. Students will also have their first teacher meeting discuss any questions as they start the course.

 

Unit 12:  Students will complete all language lessons in this unit, 3 live teacher sessions tutorials and story recordings along with the interview project where students interview a native Mandarin Chinese speaker. Students will also have 2 general meetings with the teacher to  review their progress in Moodle to ensure that all components outlined in the course are completed and they have submitted completion. 

 

 

 

Spanish 10

Spanish 10 is a beginning-intermediate course intended for students with Spanish 5-9 or equivalent. This course covers Units 11 and 12 in Rosetta Stone Foundations and prepares…

Spanish 10 is a beginning-intermediate course intended for students with Spanish 5-9 or equivalent. This course covers Units 11 and 12 in Rosetta Stone Foundations and prepares students for Spanish 11. 

The Rosetta Stone lessons will be accompanied by other learning activities, such as group conversation sessions, games and stories, oral and written activities, two cultural projects, two formal (virtual) assessments with the teacher, and a final (home-proctored) exam. This course can be completed in a minimum of 15 weeks. 

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 11 and 12)

  • 1 activation project & survey

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • video conversation meetings with teacher

  • 4 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • 1 at-home timed quiz


Working computer with Internet required. 

 

Headset with microphone recommended.

 

Spanish 10

Designed for students with some Spanish experience (Spanish 9)  this course prepares students to enter a Spanish 11 course. Students will create their own curriculum from a variety…

Designed for students with some Spanish experience (Spanish 9)  this course prepares students to enter a Spanish 11 course. Students will create their own curriculum from a variety of resources that include grammar, culture, conversation, reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements


Describing people, objects,
and locations

Expressing interests, opinions,
and beliefs

 

Asking questions 

 

Making comparisons

 

Describing activities, situations,
and events using present,
past, and future tense 

 

Hispanic culture and contribution to society

 

First people’s perspectives

 


  • 1 cultural project

  • Min. 2 conversation
    meetings with teacher

  • Writing and speaking
    samples

  • Portfolio of completed
    work 

*Assessments are tailored to students’ needs and interests


Working computer with Internet required. 

 

Headset with microphone may be needed.

 

 

Purchase of textbook/workbook optional.

 

Spanish 10

Spanish 10 is a beginning-intermediate course intended for students with Spanish 5-9 or equivalent. This course covers Units 11 and 12 in Rosetta Stone Foundations and prepares…

Spanish 10 is a beginning-intermediate course intended for students with Spanish 5-9 or equivalent. This course covers Units 11 and 12 in Rosetta Stone Foundations and prepares students for Spanish 11. 

The Rosetta Stone lessons will be accompanied by other learning activities, such as group conversation sessions, games and stories, oral and written activities, two cultural projects, two formal (virtual) assessments with the teacher, and a final (home-proctored) exam. 

In this Synchronous version of the course, students meet with their teacher once a week, in a virtual class on Zoom. The teacher will introduce the lesson and assignments for the week, give instructions, lead discussion, and prepare the students for the week’s work.  Students commit to keeping pace with the class and participating in the weekly zoom meetings which will last up to 60 minutes.

The synchronous option meets weekly. Yearly schedules can be found here

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements

Rosetta Stone Level 3 (Units 11 and 12)

  • 1 activation project & survey

  • 2 cultural research projects

  • video conversation meetings with teacher

  • 4 live tutoring sessions through RS

  • 1 at-home timed quiz


Working computer with Internet required. 

 

Headset with microphone recommended.

 

Humanities 10 - Social Studies 10

    IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO: • Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10 (4 credits) • Humanities 10 - Literary…

 

 

IF YOU ARE SELECTING THIS COURSE, ALSO SELECT THE OTHER COURSES THAT ARE PART OF THIS COMBO:

• Humanities 10 - Christian Studies 10 (4 credits)

• Humanities 10 - Literary Studies 10 (2 credits) 

• Humanities 10 – Composition 10 (2 credits)

Humanities 10 students also have the option to add 

• Humanities 10 - Leadership 10 (4 credits)

Humanities 10 is far more than just a 4 in 1 plus 1 course credit arrangement. Although students receive full credit for four important graduation program courses, the integrated approach, which Humanities 10 employs, blends the literary and cultural developments of the times with enduring biblical reference points. The eight episode modules follow Canadian history from 1914 to the present and are best understood as a testimony to the promise and failure of progress and modernity - that is, the propensity of human beings to enlarge, expand, ascend, or otherwise prove one's personhood in moral and cultural space.

 

 

Humanities 10 is not bounded by these dates. While journeying through periods of war and peace, fragmentation and reform it is hoped that students will engage an innovative framework that first considers the late modern basis for social order, and thereafter work through learning interventions that compel them to recover their 'voice' in view of 20th century developments that remain formative on human thought and practice today. 

Furthermore, the option to add Leadership 10, featuring a deep dive into the joy of Gospel Leadership, is an efficient way to build a high school graduation transcript attractive to both post-secondary employers and institutions of higher education. The possibilities are limitless with this multifaceted and multi-genre program.

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Episode 1:  The Rise and Fall of Empires (1914 to 1919) 

  • Episode 2:  Boom and Bust (20s and 30s)

  • Episode 3:  Violence and Violation (40s and 50s)

  • Episode 4:  Aquarius and Angst (60s and 70s)

  • Episode 5:  Money as Meaning (the 1980s)

  • Episode 6:  New World Order (the 1990s)

  • Episode 7:  Digital Kids (the 2000s)

  • Episode 8:  The Liquid Modern Age (2010 - Present)

This is a synchronous hybrid multi-credit 8-episode program.

8 monthly Assignment Sets

Participation in Weekly Lectures and Tutorials 



 

Enthusiasm for robust biblical engagement with

historical and literary themes. Students are required

to download and complete or print assignments, scan

(either by taking pictures or physically scanning) and

upload their assignments. This course also requires

attendance of LIVE biweekly lectures and tutorials with

the teaching team using ZOOM video. conferencing. 

Humanities 10 is best completed as a linear program

starting in September but other special arrangements can

be made if necessary after consultation with the Hum10

teaching team.

Humanities 10 (Abbotsford and Chilliwack CC plus)

Abbotsford and Chilliwack CCPlus Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” Looking at the last 100 years of history could…

Abbotsford and Chilliwack CCPlus

Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” Looking at the last 100 years of history could cause us to question the truth of this quote. After all, the Holocaust, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Vietnam War, and genocide in Rwanda and Yugoslavia are clear evidence of the depth of human sin.  However, the past 100 years has also has many advancements for justice, such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, desegregation and the end of apartheid, and the fall of communism in many parts of the world. And where has God been in all of this? What does the Bible say about God’s heart for justice, and how is Christ’s work of reconciliation and redemption tied into the pursuit of justice on this side of eternity? In Humanities 10, students will not only gain a better understanding of the last 100 years of human history from a Canadian perspective, but they will have the opportunity to read, write, and speak about who we are as the human race. They will hopefully develop their own hearts for justice, in the hopes that in the next 100 years the moral arc of the universe will bend a little farther in the right direction.

Grade 10 students who enrol in this Humanities course through the Abbotsford or Chilliwack CC+ will earn credit for Literary Studies 10, Composition 10, Social Studies 10, and Christian Studies 10 for a total of 12 credits. 

Grade 11 students who completed Humanities at CC+ in a previous year can also register to earn credit for Literary Studies 11, Social Studies 10, and Christian Studies 11 for a total of 12 credits

Major Units and Topics Assessment Requirements
  • Literary Studies and Composition 10: 

    • Learning to Write Well

    • To Kill a Mockingbird

    • Merchant of Venice

    • Short stories and poems

  • Social Studies 10

    • 1914-1940

    • 1940-1963

    • 1963-1990

    • 1990-2001

    • 2001-Present

  • Christian Studies 10

    • Social Justice

    • Luke

  • Lit Studies and Composition: 

  • In-class and online forum discussions

  • Response and reflection questions

  • To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

  • Merchant of Venice Performance

  • Variations on a Theme Project

  • Social Studies inquiry project

  • Do Justice community service project

  • Justice Seeker Biography report



 

 

This course is delivered through Abbotsford and

Chilliwack Community Connections. Registration

for these courses must be completed through Learning

Groups.

Classes will meet for 30 weeks. Approximately half of

instructional time will be face to face in Community

Connections.  The other half will be delivered in an online

format, with students completing weekly assignments in

each of the courses.

Humanities 10 (Langley CC plus)

Langley CCPlus     Click Course Schedule for a detailed description of expectations including weekly classes, online lectures, virtual sessions, and field trips. Humanities…

Langley CCPlus

 

 

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